Tag:Bill Hall
Posted on: November 29, 2010 5:28 pm
 

Eight teams interested in Hall

Hall Bill Hall is receiving extensive interest and has heard from eight teams, according to Tim Brown of Yahoo! Sports .

Hall, who rehabilitated his value as a utility player for the Red Sox and rediscovered his power stroke, would make sense for a lot of teams who could play him all over the diamond and get him enough at-bats to appease his desire to play full time.

The Rockies are one team known to be interested in Hall, having called about his services as Troy Renck of the Denver Post notes. The Yankees have also been linked to the utility infielder, while its unknown if Boston is interested in bringing Hall back.

One drawback to having Hall on the team is that he really should get first priority off the bench to play. While that has immense value, it can also get in the way of other bench players who are more restricted in position but may bring other commodities to the table. In addition, if a team is full up on quality position players, it can be hard for the club to allocate playing time.

Take the Red Sox for example. They found enough playing time for Hall in 2010 that enabled him to walk to the plate 382 times, but a lot of those times was due to the injuries of Mike Cameron, Jacoby Ellsbury, Dustin Pedroia and Kevin Youkilis.

The market for top bench players should crystallize over the next week or two once the first several mid-tier players start coming off the board. With Juan Uribe's signing in L.A., the first domino may have fallen.

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 23, 2010 6:08 pm
 

Red Sox decline to offer arbitration to Varitek

Varitek Could Jason Varitek's Red Sox career be coming to an end?

While not closing the books on his return, Boston declined to offer arbitration to the backstop, meaning Varitek cannot accept and bind both sides to a one-year deal.

Varitek's return to Boston actually improved Tuesday with the news that catcher Victor Martinez is inking a deal with the Tigers, but the continued declining of the arbitration offer even after that news broke speaks to how cautious Boston is being. Varitek would likely have gotten a slight bump over his 2010 salary of $3 million. As a Type B free agent, he could have brought Boston a supplemental first-rounder had he declined the offer of arbitration and signed elsewhere.

Meanwhile, the club also declined to offer arbitration to Bill Hall, closing the books on his onerous contract that was largely subsidized by the Brewers. Mike Lowell, a Type B free agent, was also not offered arbitration as the veteran is expected to retire.

Arbitration was offered to Martinez, Adrian Beltre and Felipe Lopez. With V-Mart's trek to Detroit, Boston will hold the No. 19 pick in the draft, unless Detroit signs a higher-profile free agent, which is unlikely. They also gain a supplemental first-round pick. The team is in shape to gain from Adrian Beltre's departure as well, if it happens, so Boston may be more willing to part with its own first-round pick as a result.

The last player to be offered arbitration was infielder Felipe Lopez, who likely has a gentleman's agreement with the club to decline. That gives the Red Sox a free pick after Lopez was released by the Cardinals late in the season and plucked up by Boston for the chance at the extra draft pick.

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 16, 2010 8:46 pm
Edited on: November 16, 2010 10:53 pm
 

Tuesday evening rumor roundup

Well, the first day of the general managers' meetings in Orlando was more eventful than expected. The Braves stole Dan Uggla from the Marlins, the Cardinals re-signed Jake Westbrook and Florida overpaid for John Buck.

There's other talk 'round the meetings and here's a few of the other notes from Tuesday:

• The Marlins are looking at a multi-year deal with right-hander Ricky Nolasco. (Miami Herald )

• Reds general manager Walt Jocketty says he's spoken to the agents for free agents Arthur Rhodes and Miguel Cairo. Asked if the Reds were likely to sign any outside free agents, Jocketty said, "probably not." (Cincinnati Enquirer )

• Jocketty says the Reds are talking to teams about acquiring a leadoff hitter. (MLB.com )

• The agent for Reds right fielder Jay Bruce says his client is open to selling out his arbitration-eligible years in a long-term deal. Bruce is a Super Two player. (MLB.com )

• Free agent left-hander Jeff Francis is drawing interest from the Pirates, Mariners, Rockies, Brewers and Astros. (ESPN.com )

• The Yankees are interested in left-handed reliever Pedro Feliciano. (Newsday )

• Bill Hall could be an option for the Yankees. (FoxSports.com )

• Chad Tracy, who played for the Marlins and Cubs last season, has signed with Japan's Hiroshima Carp for about $1.3 million. (NPB Tracker )

• Former Red and Mariner Wladimir Balentien has reportedly signed to play in Japan. (NPB Tracker )

• Japan's SoftBank Hawks are working on signing Marcus Thames. (NPB Tracker )

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.




Posted on: November 3, 2010 11:25 am
Edited on: November 4, 2010 9:01 pm
 

Predicting where free agents will land

Baseball is currently in a five-day period where teams have exclusivity to negotiate with players who have become free agents. Sunday at midnight, that period will expire and free up players to talk to any and all teams.

There's plenty to like about this free-agent crop, as the top players at each position is enough to put together a contending team. Plus, there are a good number of nice backup options, too.

Below, you can find Evan Brunell's predictions on where free agents will wind up, going position by position with two names at each position.

Martinez C: Victor Martinez -- Tigers. All the noise surrounding Detroit going hard after Martinez seems legit. It's part of Detroit's M.O., filling a position of desperate need to contend and Martinez is the best option and remains capable of catching. Plus, Detroit has no major block at first or DH for an eventual switch for V-Mart as Alex Avila apprentices.

C: John Buck -- Yankees. Jorge Posada will be receiving most of his at-bats as a DH and Francisco Cervelli certainly can't start. The Yankees will flex their financial muscles on a catcher which they can bring in on a short-term contract who broke out in Toronto last season. It solves the catcher conundrum short term and leaves the long term free for Austin Romine.

Dunn 1B: Adam Dunn -- Cubs. Another popular pairing that makes too much sense. The Cubs need to strike to stay in contention even as they try to get their minor-league system in order and producing over the next couple of seasons. Dunn's defense is minimized now that he's at first, and the Cubs need someone to sky them big flies. (And if the Cubs really are not going after big-name free agents , which I doubt is 100 percent true, I'll tab Dunn to the Athletics .)

1B: Aubrey Huff -- Giants. Unfortunately, while bringing in Huff eventually paid off big time for San Francisco, he is now overrated. With Brandon Belt tearing up the farm, there's no overwhelming reason to give Huff anything close to what he can get on the market. I have a feeling Brian Sabean will do what he always does, signing older players coming off big years to nonsensical contracts. You know it and I know it. Sleeper alert: The Giants move forward with a Mark DeRosa/Travis Ishikawa platoon at first, leaving Huff to land with the Mariners .

Hudson 2B: Orlando Hudson -- Padres. The O-Dog will be on the move again, looking for his fourth team in four seasons, fifth overall. He's long wanted to join the Mets, but Luis Castillo has prevented him from doing so. The Padres plan to contend, but still need the dollars to make sense for who they bring in, and it will for Hudson to plug a vacancy at second with no viable internal options.

2B: Bill Hall -- Twins. Hall is looking for a starting job, but there are those telling him he is best suited as a super utility player. Look for Minnesota to give him a chance at the starting 2B job, but the Twins will love moving him around once they can justify it.

Jeter SS: Derek Jeter -- Yankees. I think a lot of people are going to be a bit surprised by how long the negotiations take. Despite popular sentiment, Brian Cashman is not one to pay someone beyond actual value. What he does have is disposable income that the owners can order him to pay a premium, so Cashman will do just that -- but only at a small premium.

SS: Juan Uribe -- Giants. This is one return that makes sense. Edgar Renteria isn't being brought back, even if he doesn't retire. Pablo Sandoval's struggles at third and Uribe's ability to slide to third as need be will be coveted by San Francisco, and he deserves the deal he'll sign for. It's a very weak market for shortstops, so even those that could be available in a trade (Jason Bartlett?) may have too prohibitive a price.

Beltre 3B: Adrian Beltre -- Angels. Los Angeles makes the big strike here, importing a gifted defender who had a great season with the stick. He won't hit .321 again, but he'll be a signing on the level of Torii Hunter. He's expensive but will produce and help put L.A. back into postseason contention.

3B: Miguel Tejada -- Padres. San Diego was pleased with Tejada's production after acquiring him from Houston and will sign him to play his natural position of short even though he began the transition to third base last season.

Crawford LF: Carl Crawford -- Red Sox . Crawford will spark a bidding war between the Red Sox, Angels and some other team yet to be known, plus a late charge by the Yankees (you know it'll happen). In the end, the Red Sox will win out, offering just enough to entice Crawford to Boston.

LF: Marcus Thames -- Phillies. Thames built his value this past year, establishing himself as a strong platoon option against left-handers who surprisingly held his own against righties. The Phillies are interested in bringing in another right-handed hitter to pair with Ben Francisco, and Thames seems like the perfect low-cost, high-upside option.

Damon CF: Johnny Damon -- Astros. Damon may be a center fielder, but it's in name only as he's restricted to left and DH at this point of his career. No contending team is going to be interested in starting him, but he can still land somewhere where there's a faint glimmer of a chance at the postseason. Damon can be the grizzled, scrappy veteran who can lead them to the top. Welcome to Houston, Johnny!

CF: Melky Cabrera -- Royals. Cabrera's stock is down. Way, way down. He'll have to latch on with a bottom-feeding club who gambles on his tools. Kansas City seems like the perfect place to do that. With an up-and-coming farm, he could fit in seamlessly if he takes his job seriously. If he doesn't, the Royals simply move on.

Werth RF: Jayson Werth -- White Sox. It makes a lot of sense for the White Sox to go after Werth -- they have their own bandbox and need someone who can play the outfield and who could DH in his off days. Carlos Quentin's defense needs to be hidden or moved to first if they don't bring Paul Konerko back. Helping matters is Chicago has the money to make it happen.

RF: Andruw Jones -- Braves. Coming off a strong season for the White Sox where he proved he can still bring it, just not quite as a full-time outfielder (although that possibility does exist), Jones seems like he could make a return to Atlanta. The Braves have a need to remake their outfield, and Jones seems to be a perfect piece of the puzzle.

Thome DH: Jim Thome -- Twins. No reason for Thome to leave the Twins, really. He had a strong season there, became a cult hero, has been loyal to his teams and Minnesota definitely could use this slugger back provided the two can agree on how much playing time he will get. Having Delmon Young, Denard Span, Michael Cuddyer, Jason Kubel and Justin Morneau doesn't leave much room for Thome, but it worked out just fine in 2010.

DH: Manny Ramirez -- Rays . Manny is a DH and probably will find the market a bit hostile towards him. He's not upper-echelon any longer, but not many teams need a DH. After long and overdrawn-out negotiations thanks to Scott Boras, ManRam will finally sign around the beginning of spring training and coast into town to help the Rays and what could be a moribund offense.

Pavano RHSP: Carl Pavano -- Brewers. Pavano is set to cash in on his success with the Twins and is certain to be in a position where he can outdo accepting arbitration thanks to a poor right-handed starter's market. Milwaukee needs to find starting pitching and fast, and the Brewers proved last year with Randy Wolf they weren't afraid to go get it. Wolf's struggles won't be enough to deter Milwaukee from Pavano, not when a Wolf-Pavano-Yovani Gallardo rotation would do wonders in the NL Central.

RHSP: Hiroki Kuroda -- Dodgers. Kuroda's been a bit overlooked on the national stage, as he truly is a strong pitcher. The Dodgers want -- need -- to contend, so they'll make sure Kuroda goes nowhere. They do need to slash salary, but a lot of that was tied up in Manny Ramirez, so there's plenty for Kuroda.

Lee LHSP: Cliff Lee -- Rangers. Buy into Texas being players for Lee and Lee eschewing the bright lights of New York just as long as the money is there. And it will be. The wife likes having him close to home, he's going to be on a contending team and get his money. There isn't much reason to move to New York.

LHSP: Jorge De La Rosa -- Tigers. Detroit has money to spend and a need in the rotation. De la Rosa will flirt with quite a few teams, Yankees included, but it's Detroit who will step up. It needs a strong pitcher in the rotation to have any hope of contending, and de la Rosa falls right into the bracket the Tigers are comfortable with.

Soriano RHRP: Rafael Soriano -- Angels . L.A. has said all the right things in moving forward with Fernando Rodney as a closer after moving Brian Fuentes, but the Angels bullpen was in tatters all season and Rodney is not good enough to block Soriano, who is one of the best closers in the game but will find a rough market.

RHRP: Joaquin Benoit -- Rays . Benoit's price tag is going to be high, but the Rays will be faced with a barren bullpen. Why not bring back someone they know can do it for them? They can entice Benoit with the possibility -- probability -- about taking over as closer.

LHRP: Scott Downs -- Red Sox. Downs is a Type-A free agent, but Boston will gladly fork over its second-rounder after Crawford gives Tampa Bay its first-rounder. The Red Sox want to beef up their bullpen after years of trolling through cast-offs. Downs has been coveted for a while, and Boston will take the plunge.

LHRP: Brian Fuentes -- Marlins. Florida wants to contend, but needs some help in the bullpen to do so. Knowing the Fish, they won't be looking to spend big at the position, but Fuentes is a nice, safe and affordable pick to be the new closer they want.

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: November 2, 2010 11:25 am
Edited on: November 2, 2010 11:28 am
 

Red Sox decline Hall's option

Bill Hall The latest from the Boston Globe 's Nick Cafardo in bullet points:

• The Red Sox have declined the $9.25 million option on Bill Hall (pictured), but would like to have him back.

• Boston will make a decision on David Ortiz's $12.5 million option soon. The deadline is midnight, Thursday.

• J.P. Ricciardi will make a decision between the Mets or Red Sox front offices.

"I am working on a couple of things and will know more later this week," Ricciardi told Cafardo in a text.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.


Posted on: October 6, 2010 1:06 am
Edited on: October 6, 2010 1:12 am
 

R.I.P. Red Sox: Injuries crumble promising year

RIP All eyes will be on eight teams starting Oct. 6 for yet another chapter of postseason baseball. As the sports world waits for the crowning of a new (or as the Yankees hope, repeat) champion, 22 other teams are busy preparing for spring training. What went wrong for these teams, and what does 2011 hold? MLB Facts and Rumors here at CBS Sports will be answering those questions through all of October. The Red Sox kick off the latest installment.

The Red Sox went into 2010 with an Opening Day payroll just over the luxury tax threshold. This isn't a common occurrence in Boston, as the club likes to hold cash back for midseason deals, but there was only one problem with that: Boston didn't have the depth to bank on these midseason deals coming to fruition.

In the first year of a two-year "bridge" plan to integrate top minor leaguers into the team, the Red Sox succeeded in putting together an excellent team. They just forgot to sign one person: Lady Luck.

Injuries dominated the entire season en route to an 89-win season, a failure in these parts.

WHAT WENT WRONG

Almost no one was immune from injury, with only Adrian Beltre lasting the entire season as a healthy position player. Here's a quick roundup around the diamond:

C: Victor Martinez broke his thumb and went on the disabled list for a month. Jason Varitek fractured his foot in a season similar to Dustin Pedroia's and also missed extended time. Kevin Cash and Gustavo Molina did a poor job of holding down the fort while trade-deadline acquisition Jarrod Saltalamacchia eventually caved to injury as well.

1B: Kevin Youkilis was headed to another MVP-caliber season before tearing a tendon in his right thumb, ending his season on August 3.

Dustin Pedroia 2B: Pedroia (pictured) went down with a left-foot fracture, missing almost two months before returning August 17 and quickly landing right back on the disabled list after a setback.

SS: Marco Scutaro gamely stuck in the entire season, but suffered from left-elbow tendinitis, a sore neck, a pinched nerve and a right-shoulder impingement. He eventually had to shift to second base to finish out the year once he no longer could make the throw from short. Expected backup Jed Lowrie missed the first half of the season due to mono, but could battle Scutaro for the shortstop gig in 2011.

3B: Only Beltre escaped the wrath of the injury gods.

OF: J.D. Drew somehow hung in there all season, strange from the poster boy of injuries. He paid for it with one of his worst seasons, while center fielder Mike Cameron battled kidney stones and an abdominal tear before hanging it up. Jacoby Ellsbury got a Beltre knee to the ribs and suffered through a season full of misdiagnoses, rehab, returns, setbacks and questioning of his makeup.

SP: Daisuke Matsuzaka's spring training was delayed with a sore neck among other issues, while Josh Beckett celebrated his lucrative contract extension with a back problem that knocked him out over two months with a lower back strain and couldn't put anything together on the mound.

While the bullpen didn't have many injury problems, it had plenty with ineffectiveness and was one of the worst in the leagues. The poor play of closer Jonathan Papelbon (and free-agent starting pitcher John Lackey) only served to compound matters.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

Clay Buchholz took the next big step and now pairs with Jon Lester -- who cemented himself as one of the best pitchers in the game -- to give Boston a young and incredibly talented top of the rotation. While Buchholz' 2.33 ERA is unsustainably low, there's no hiding his major step forward.

Daniel Bard impressed on the mound as well en route to becoming one of the most dominant setup men in the game, with many clamoring for his ascension to the closer's role in 2011.

Bill Hall shook off the cobwebs of the last few seasons, rediscovering the power stroke that enabled him to slam 30 home runs for the Brewers. His ability to play multiple positions was a lifesaver for Boston, which was able to deploy him where there were holes. Darnell McDonald came up from the minors as a veteran and made a splash in his debut, going on to establish himself as a fourth outfielder who can start against left-handers.

Adrian Beltre had a MVP-caliber season and established himself as a strong clubhouse presence -- but not when he gets his head rubbed .

HELP ON THE WAY

The Red Sox knew the minors wouldn't be of much help in 2011, and they were right. While players like Lars Anderson and Josh Reddick got their taste of the bigs, success was limited to just two.

One was outfielder Ryan Kalish, who imitated Sonic the Hedgehog in the outfield with his diving flip catches. Kalish struggled to adjust to major-league pitching but showed the talent and the guts to be named as a future 20 homer/20 stolen base candidate.

Felix Doubront zipped through Double- and Triple-A en route to making a few starts for Boston before joining the bullpen. Before his season was cut short to (all together now...) injury, he flashed the potential to make a major impact in the bullpen next season. His future in Boston likely lies in how the team addresses its shortcomings in the bullpen.

EXPECTATIONS FOR 2011

The Red Sox will be expected to win, as is always the case in town. Given the team doesn't have much help from the farm on the horizon, Boston will again have to turn to the free-agent market. The Red Sox have a hair over $100 million committed in 2011 salaries and only expected raises for Jacoby Ellsbury and Papelbon to factor in. That should give the team upwards of $50 million to play with, and they'll need all of it with Martinez and Beltre free agents.

SUGGESTIONS FOR 2011

Adrian Beltre Adrian Beltre should be high on the priority list. No, he won't match his 2010 levels of production, but will remain one of the best third basemen in the game. Even though all signs point to his departure, money talks -- and unlike last season, Beltre now knows what life is like in Boston and seems open to a return.

Victor Martinez should also see a return to town, as he can catch for at least a couple more seasons and give the Red Sox quality at the plate. Martinez' ability to play first base also helps matters. However, Martinez also has his own signs pointing to a departure.

If so, Boston needs to go out and get an impact bat, with five-tooler Carl Crawford the prize. Jayson Werth would also be a reliable stopgap, but nowhere near the level of Crawford. If Beltre doesn't return, Boston's best bet is to shift Youkilis to third base and go after a first baseman -- perhaps Carlos Pena. Pena combines defense and powers, and if you get lucky, can hit for a solid batting average as well.

The bullpen is a key area to be addressed and while it's not Epstein's M.O. to shell out big bucks for a bullpen (which is a sound strategy), it may be time to put that philosophy aside. Scott Downs is reliever who has two things most relievers don't: an ability to pitch with a left arm and to pitch well. Epstein needs to bring the bucks and get Downs into the fold as the complement to Daniel Bard. However, the soft underbelly of middle relief is also a problem. Fortunately, there's no shortage of strong right-handed relievers -- the only question is if Epstein will go bargain-basement hunting like usual or shell out for a solid option.

2011 PREDICTION

The Red Sox will come back loaded in 2011, just like they did in 2010. The minor-leagues will be one year closer to helping out, which will only serve to deepen the depth the Red Sox will need as the season winds on. Couple that with the Yankees' own question marks and the Rays' planned slashing of the budget after seeing integral parts of the team leave as free agents this offseason, and the road to the playoffs for Boston looks far less prohibitive than 2010's road did.

Check out the rest of the R.I.P. teams here .

-- Evan Brunell

Join MLB Facts and Rumors at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday to chat live during the Rangers -Rays game!

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Posted on: August 23, 2010 4:02 pm
Edited on: August 23, 2010 7:07 pm
 

Report: Red Sox claim Johnny Damon

Johnny Damon Could the Caveman be headed back to his old haunts?

The Red Sox claimed Johnny Damon on waivers Monday, giving the team 48 hours to get Damon back into a Red Sox uniform as Joel Sherman of the New York Post reports .

Damon, of course, is perhaps best known for two things: his time in a Red Sox uniform where he banded together with other "Idiots" and won a World Series in 2004. He's also renowned for saying he would never play for the Yankees, then doing just that and nabbing a championship ring in 2009.

In his first year with the Tigers, Damon has split time between left field and designated hitter, hitting .270/.355/.409 and proving he's still got some thump left in the bat as a 36-year-old. Damon is finishing up a $8 million deal, meaning the Red Sox would have to assume just over a million left on the salary -- and perhaps some players, if the Tigers won't deal Damon without getting names in return.

Detroit is 11 games out of first place, essentially done for the season. They are expected to make Brandon Inge and Jhonny Peralta available through waiver deals as well. It's possible the Tigers would revoke trade waivers on Damon if they can't get anything beyond salary relief, but for a team out of the race and in a city with plenty of economic struggles, it's hard to imagine the Tigers not forking Damon over.

Damon has played just two games in the field since July 28, serving as the team's primary DH, so Damon isn't exactly required for outfield depth. The Tigers could DH Carlos Guillen when he returns from the disabled list or give both Ryan Raburn and Brennan Boesch full time duty. As for Damon in Boston, he would replace the motley crew of Daniel Nava, Bill Hall and Darnell McDonald, taking over left-field duties.

As Sherman notes , Damon said last season he would not consider returning to the Red Sox because of his experience moving from Boston to New York and not wanting to go through that another time. However, that was before the Yankees didn't bring Damon back, who willingly letting him go while the Red Sox chased his services. In addition, it's been proven that Damon doesn't always stick to his word. The chance for Damon to go back to his old stomping grounds and try to engineer another comeback will be very difficult for him to turn down.

And yet, he may not be inclined to do just that, as AOL Fanhouse's Ed Price reports .

The Red Sox certainly hope he changes his mind, however. Boston's left-field combo of Nava, Hall and McDonald is not enough to vault the team solidly into contention with an upcoming series against the Rays. Nava is a great story, but has struggled in his last 10 games, hitting .158. In addition, Nava hasn't proved himself on the major-league stage yet, while Damon doesn't blanch from the bright lights.

As for Hall, he would certainly lose playing time but would at least be in a time share with Jed Lowrie at second -- not to mention that Damon probably wouldn't be a full-time player with the terrible defense he brings to the game these days. Darnell McDonald (especially against left-handers) and Bill Hall would still see ample time in left, mostly in parks with a large left field as opposed to the Green Monster at Fenway.

Can you imagine Damon's return to Fenway Park? One thing's for sure: the boos would become cheers -- especially if Damon brings back the famed beard.

-- Evan Brunell

UPDATE: Even if Damon is undecided, David Ortiz isn't. Ortiz gave his unconditional support to a Damon resurrection in Boston.

Ortiz said to reporters (via the Boston Herald ): "Let me call him right now. … That would be great, man. You know Johnny. Johnny’s a fun person to be around. I’m pretty sure he’d be excited to be back. For all those people that did him wrong, he could put that back together — make 'em forget about the Yankees.”

Catcher Jason Varitek said Damon is a "special player" and "one hell of a teammate."

UPDATE: Damon said he won't be thinking about his future during tonight's game (for the Tigers, by the way): "I promise I won't think about it during the game. I'll think about trying to get hits and stuff." (Via MLB.com's Jason Beck's Twitter .)

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .


Posted on: June 26, 2010 12:04 am
Edited on: June 26, 2010 2:18 am
 

Pedroia leaves game with foot injury

Dustin Pedroia left Boston's game in San Francisco in the third inning after fouling a ball off of the inside of his left foot in the third inning.

Pedroia, who hit three home runs on Thursday, stayed in the game long enough to work a walk, but he struggled to get to first. Pedroia was replaced by Mike Cameron to pinch-run.

Cameron stayed in the game and went to center field. Bill Hall moved from right field to second base and Darnell McDonald moved from center field to right field.

It seems like another day, another injury for the Red Sox. Jacoby Ellsbury (rib), Josh Beckett (back), Jeremy Hermida (ribs) and Mike Lowell (hip) are currently on the disabled list, while Kevin Youkilis (arm) isn't 100 percent. Victor Martinez has also played through pain, while Cameron and Daisuke Matsuzaka have recently come off the disabled list.

UPDATE: Pedroia was on crutches after the game, but manager Terry Francona told the Boston Herald 's Michael Silverman there was no break, but he would be re-evaluated on Saturday.

"I'm sore,” he said. "I’ll get checked out [Saturday] and make sure we get to the bottom of everything, but I’m pretty disappointed. I’ve never really hit a ball there before. But I’ll be all right."

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.




 
 
 
 
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