Tag:Bobby Valentine
Posted on: November 28, 2011 8:19 pm
Edited on: November 29, 2011 11:08 am
 

Report: Red Sox to name manager Tuesday

By Matt Snyder

Boston managerial search
UPDATE: Scott Miller has now reported that the decision will drag on until later in the week.



The Boston Red Sox are expected to name their new manager Tuesday. Bobby Valentine and Gene Lamont are the finalists, and Valentine is flying back from Japan Tuesday. The belief is that when he gets back, the Red Sox will inform both managerial candidates of their decision, reports Joel Sherman of the New York Post.

On the other hand, Sean McAdam of CSN New England is reporting that Tuesday being decision day is "inaccurate." I guess we'll find out soon enough which person is right. Regardless, pretty much everyone has reported the search has been narrowed to Lamont and Valentine.

Lamont, 64, is currently the Tigers' third base coach, but has two managerial stints under his belt. He managed the White Sox from 1992-1995, winning the AL manager of the year in 1993 as the White Sox won the AL West. Lamont's Sox were in first again in 1994, but the season was ended without a postseason due to labor strife. He then managed the Pirates from 1997-2000, never winning more than 79 games in a season.

Valentine, 61, managed the Rangers for parts of eight seasons and then the Mets for parts of seven seasons. He won two NL wild cards and one NL pennant with the Mets and has 1,117 wins against 1,072 losses in his managerial career. Valentine also served as a manager in Japan for several years and is currently a baseball analyst for ESPN.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 25, 2011 2:25 pm
Edited on: November 25, 2011 2:39 pm
 

Boston to choose between Valentine and Lamont?



By C. Trent Rosecrans


The Red Sox may be down to Bobby Valentine and Gene Lamont as their next manager with an announcement coming next week, according to multiple reports out of Boston.

Both Valentine and Lamont have met with the Red Sox ownership group, while Toronto first base coach Torey Lovullo has not. Alex Speier of WEEI.com reports the team will do no more interviews, so it appears the team is down to the two.

Peter Abraham of the Boston Globe cites sources as saying Valentine is "really excited" about the possibility of managing the Red Sox -- and certainly the Boston media is really excited about covering the outspoken Valentine, probably more than Lamont, who is perceived to be more milquetoast than Valentine.

Lamont, easily the underdog, does have eight years of managing under his belt. The 64-year-old managed the White Sox from 1992-95, winning a division title and the Manager of the Year award in 1993. Lamont's White Sox were in first place in 1994 when MLB went on strike. He also managed the Pirates from 1997-2000, leading the Pirates to their best record (79-83 in 1997) during the franchise's current streak of 19 consecutive losing seasons. He's been on Jim Leyland's staff in Detroit since 2006.

Valentine is currently an announcer on ESPN and last managed in the big leagues in 2002. In 15 seasons with the Rangers and Mets, valentine has a 1,117-1,072 record, leading the Mets to the World Series in 2000. He also done two stints as a manager in Japan, winning the 2005 Japan Series with the Chiba Lotte Marines.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 21, 2011 6:43 pm
Edited on: November 21, 2011 9:40 pm
 

Red Sox narrow managerial candidates to three

By Matt Snyder

According to general manager Ben Cherington -- via ESPN Boston -- the Red Sox have narrowed their list of possible managers to three names: Bobby Valentine, Torey Lovullo and Gene Lamont.

As we've previously noted, Valentine had an all-day interview with Cherington Monday and there's much speculation that he's the favorite to land the job. But it's not a done deal and there are two other candidates.

Lamont, 64, is currently the Tigers' third base coach, but has two managerial stints under his belt. He managed the White Sox from 1992-1995, winning the AL manager of the year in 1993 as the White Sox won the AL West. Lamont's Sox were in first again in 1994, but the season was ended without a postseason due to labor strife. He then managed the Pirates from 1997-2000, never winning more than 79 games in a season.

Lovullo, 46, was the Blue Jays' first-base coach in 2011 after being the Pawtucket Red Sox manager in 2010. He also managed for several years in the Indians' minor-league system and has a pair of manager of the year awards to show for that time.

There's no timetable set for a hire, but with the list narrowed to three candidates, it's reasonable to believe a hire is coming soon.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 20, 2011 6:20 pm
 

Valentine to interview Monday with Cherington

By Matt Snyder

All of a sudden, the talk of Bobby Valentine becoming the next Red Sox manager is heating up. Multiple outlets -- both local and national -- are reporting that Valentine has an interview with Boston brass Monday (Jeff Passan of Yahoo was first to report) and that if the interview goes well, Valentine will become the frontrunner to land the job. In fact, Passan reports that Valentine will meet with Red Sox general manager Ben Cherington all day at the request of the ownership, and if Cherington approves Valentine will be named the manager.

Basically, it sounds like Cherington's guy was Dale Sveum and when the Cubs nabbed him, the Red Sox owners have pushed Valentine onto the new GM -- just as Scott Miller opined two days ago, when he said the Red Sox are "directionless."

The 61-year-old managed the Rangers for parts of eight seasons and then the Mets for parts of seven seasons. He won two NL wild cards and one NL pennant with the Mets and has 1,117 wins against 1,072 losses in his managerial career.

Valentine also served as a manager in Japan for several years and is currently a baseball analyst for ESPN.

He's also a very polarizing figure, as he's either a "love him" or "hate him" guy for baseball fans. You won't find many, if any, fans who are indifferent on Valentine. Thus, it seems pretty fitting these Red Sox are possibly going to hire him.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 17, 2011 4:31 pm
Edited on: November 18, 2011 6:05 am
 

Report: Red Sox meet with Bobby Valentine

By Matt Snyder

The Red Sox are now the lone team in Major League Baseball without a manager after the Cardinals replaced retired Tony La Russa with Mike Matheny and with the Cubs set to name Dale Sveum as their new skipper on Friday. Reports Wednesday evening indicated the Red Sox were expanding their search, and it appears ESPN analyst Bobby Valentine is a candidate.

Valentine has met with "at least one Red Sox owner" and will continue to meet with the front office about the opening, FoxSports.com is reporting.

This is sure to trigger strong reactions across the board because Valentine is a pretty polarizing figure. He feels like a big name that could get Red Sox fans excited, but there also seem to be legions of fans who dislike him.

The 61-year-old managed the Rangers for parts of eight seasons and then the Mets for parts of seven seasons. He won two NL wild cards and one NL pennant with the Mets and has 1,117 wins against 1,072 losses in his managerial career.

Valentine also served as a manager in Japan for several years and is currently a baseball analyst for ESPN.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: November 2, 2011 3:36 pm
Edited on: November 14, 2011 9:11 pm
 

Who will replace Mike Quade as Cubs manager?



By C. Trent Rosecrans

Since the end of the season, there's been the assumption that Mike Quade would be out as the Cubs manager and he'd be replaced by Ryne Sandberg. Everything seemed to be playing out that way this offseason when Theo Epstein was hired by the Cubs and never really gave the impression that Quade would return.

The Cubs made the first part official on Wednesday, but made a question of the second part in a release the team sent out saying Quade would not return in 2012. While Sandberg would be a natural fit, Epstein's quote in the release gives some pause:

"The managerial search process begins immediately.  We are looking for someone with whom and around whom we can build a foundation for sustained success.  The next manager must have leadership and communication skills; he must place an emphasis on preparation and accountability; he must establish high standards and a winning culture; he must have integrity and an open mind; and he must have managerial or coaching experience at the major league level."

That means Sandberg -- who has spent the last five years as a minor league manager -- won't be considered. According to ESPN.com's Buster Olney, Epstein has alerady informed Sandberg that he wasn't in consideration.

If Sandberg isn't a candidate, who will manage the Cubs in 2012?

Here's a look at some of the possibilities:

Terry Francona: Francona will always be tied to Epstein. The two had success in Boston and there's definitely a mutual admiration. Epstein has gobbled up former Red Sox cronies since joining the Cubs, what's one more?

Dave Martinez: The Rays' bench coach is one of the hottest names when manager positions have opened up -- and he's got a Chicago connection. Martinez had two stints with the Cubs, breaking in with the organization in 1986 before being traded to Montreal. He also played there in 2000.

Pete Mackanin: A Chicago native, Mackanin has already interviewed for the Red Sox job and in addition to serving as the Phillies' bench coach in each of the last three seasons, Mackanin has twice been an interim manager -- and both of those stints came in the NL Central, with the Pirates and Reds.

Dale Sveum: Like Mackanin, Sveum is being interviewed in Boston. And it shouldn't be a surprise that there will be overlap in candidates between the two, since Epstein was involved in rounding up the candidates for the Red Sox manager position. The two organizations will have similar lists when looking for its next manager. Sveum spent two years as the Red Sox third base coach and impressed the Boston brass (including Epstein) before returning to Milwaukee where he has served as third base coach, bench coach and hitting coach under three different managers.

DeMarlo Hale: Hale's been on Boston's staff since 2006, including the last two as Francona's bench coach. Hale is a Chicago native.

Tim Bogar: Like Hale, Bogar's also been on Francona's staff in Boston, serving as the team's third base coach the last two seasons and the first base coach in 2009. He also worked for Joe Maddon in Tampa. He's also managed in the Cleveland and Houston minor league organizations.

Mike Maddux: Not only is Maddux a respected pitching coach, he also happens to be the brother of a Greg Maddux, who is beloved by the Ricketts and has served in the Cubs front office. 

Joe Maddon: Maddon was a finalist for the Red Sox job when Epstein hired Francona. While Maddon has said he's not interested in going anywhere, there's always a chance. 

John Farrell: Sure, the Blue Jays put on a full-court press to keep him away from the Red Sox, but maybe they'll be more open to let him talk to a team outside the American League East. Farrell's son is currently a pitcher at Northwestern.

Joe Girardi: Girardi's name is always going to be connected to the Cubs job when it's open, even if there's little-to-no chance he leaves the Yankees at this point.

Bobby Valentine: His name comes up with just about every opening nowadays, so why not one more?

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: October 31, 2011 1:19 pm
Edited on: November 14, 2011 9:16 pm
 

Potential replacements for La Russa



By Matt Snyder


It's back to reality in St. Louis. The Cardinals got to bask in the glory of their World Series championship for a few days, culminating with a parade Sunday afternoon. Afterwards, manager Tony La Russa told the players he's retiring. Monday morning, the move was announced in a press conference at Busch Stadium.

So it's back to business for general manager John Mozeliak. Here are a few names that might be considered -- or at least names that people might be throwing around the rumor mill in the next few days:

Terry Francona - It feels like he's got to be the immediate front-runner, though this is only speculation. Francona won two pennants and two World Series championships in eight seasons for the Red Sox, piling up a .574 winning percentage despite playing in the toughest division in baseball. He needed to get out of Boston and he did, but that doesn't mean he's averse to another job immediately.

Joe Maddon - Maddon took over the embarrassment that was the Devil Rays back in 2006. In 2008 they were just the Rays and playing in the World Series. These Rays are a perennial contender and Maddon's as much a part of that as anyone. There's no question Maddon is one of the best managers in baseball, but would he leave Tampa Bay? If Mozeliak wants Maddon, he needs to sell Maddon on the difference in experience between Tampa Bay's financial woes, low fan support and awful facilities to what he'd get in St. Louis.

La Russa retires
Terry Pendleton - He played the first seven years of his career for the Cardinals (1984-1990), was the Braves' hitting coach from 2001-2010 and is currently the Braves' first-base coach. Pendleton has been connected to Cardinals via rumors in the past (when La Russa was reportedly mulling retirement) and has also been reportedly considered to be named the manager of both the Nationals and Braves at different times. He seems like one of those guys on the cusp of getting his first shot, so maybe it happens here.

Bobby Valentine - Hey, there's a managerial opening, so we have to throw Valentine's name in the ring, right? I actually think it's a rule, so don't blame me for falling in line.

Ryne Sandberg - Sandberg is probably closer to getting his first shot than Pendleton, but both the Red Sox and Cubs are likely strongly considering him. It would be another slap in the face to the rival Cubs if the Cardinals hired the Hall of Famer (he played the overwhelming majority of his career for the Cubs -- just a heads-up to those historically challenged), but should that even be a consideration in the hiring process?

Jose Oquendo - Another former Cardinals player, the versatile Oquendo was with St. Louis from 1986-1995. He has been the Cardinals' third-base coach since 2000 and has interviewed for several other managerial openings. Oquendo also served as the manager for Puerto Rico in each of the first two World Baseball Classics.

Jim Riggleman - Riggleman played in the Cardinals' minor-league system and also managed at both the Class-A and Double-A levels for the Cardinals back in the early 1980s. He's a very highly respected baseball man, but his track record as a manager isn't sparkling. He's managed 12 seasons and made the playoffs just once (the 1998 Cubs, who had to win a one-game playoff to take the wild card). Also, the manner in which he resigned this past season from the Nationals' managerial post can't leave teams pining to hire Riggleman.

Joe Torre - Um, yeah, he's not going to manage anymore. Don't waste your time even thinking about this one.

Dave Duncan - The best pitching coach in the game is too valuable in his current role. Plus, not many pitching coaches make a successful transition to manager. I can't see the Cardinals taking this route.

Mark McGwire - One year of being a hitting coach doesn't mean he's ready to be a big-league manager. There are so many more qualified guys to have the manager job, I don't see Big Mac even being a consideration.

Albert Pujols - Hey, the White Sox considered Paul Konerko as a player-manager, right? And what better way to afford Pujols than to give him the salaries for both the manager and a superstar first baseman. Plus, he's been calling hit-and-run for years! (This is a joke, by the way. Pujols is not going to be even considered).

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: October 5, 2011 11:05 am
Edited on: October 5, 2011 4:03 pm
 

Sox won't consider Valentine, Hale

By Evan Brunell

The Terry Francona managerial search is going to be dragging on for a good while, but there's a couple of nuggets that filter out each day.

Wednesday, Sean McAdam of CSNNE.com reports that current Boston bench coach Demarlo Hale will not be considered for the Red Sox's vacant manager position. Hale was a finalist back in 2003 when Francona won the job, and Hale also came close to netting the Toronto job, losing out to fellow Sox coach John Farrell. He's a strong managerial candidate and figures to helm a bench somewhere one day, but it won't be in Boston, as McAdam writes that the Red Sox believe a fresh start is needed.

That fresh start won't include Bobby Valentine, Joe Torre or Tony La Russa, though. The Red Sox are seeking a "younger candidate, one more agreeable to working with others than a more established, veteran manager," McAdam writes.

Sources say that among the candidates discussed, some are still involved in the postseason. That would include Phillies bench coach Pete Mackanin, who seems to be a popular name in the search for a new manager. Also being considered is Rays bench coach Dave Martinez, whose team was knocked out of the playoffs on Tuesday. Another candidate is Cleveland bench coach Sandy Alomar, Jr. as well as Yankees bench coach Tony Pena, although Pena is not as viable a candidate as the aforementioned three names.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeonBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com