Tag:Brad Penny
Posted on: April 24, 2011 12:18 am
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3 up, 3 down: The new 'Daily Double' in Wrigley

By Matt Snyder

3UP

Starlin Castro and Darwin Barney, Cubs. One of my first memories as a baseball fan is the 1984 season -- in which I watched games on WGN and the Cubs had a 1-2 punch atop the order of Bob Dernier and Ryne Sandberg. They, together, were nicknamed the "Daily Double." In the decade ahead, it's entirely possible the 21-year-old Castro and 25-year-old Barney can form one of the most formidable 1-2 punches in baseball. They were on full display Saturday in the Cubs' come-from-behind 10-8 victory. Castro went 4-5 (even though one hit was the product of Jerry Sands losing a fly ball in left) with two runs and three RBI while Barney was 3-5 with two runs and three RBI. On the season, the two are completely locked in. Castro is hitting .393 with a .947 OPS. Barney is hitting .323 with a .772 OPS. Each has driven home 10 runs, which ties them for second on the team behind Alfonso Soriano. And I have to report the hits aren't cheap -- both players hit the ball hard nearly every at-bat. While the pitching staff struggles, the offense is producing well beyond expectations -- and it's mostly due to the duo atop the order.

Brad Penny, Tigers. Look, the White Sox are struggling, specifically on offense. Regardless of that, it can't be denied they have lots of really talented hitters. And Penny took a no-hitter into the sixth. He ended up going seven innings for the Tigers, allowing only that one hit -- a questionable one at that -- two walks and a hit-by-pitch in a 9-0 win.

Daisuke Matsuzaka, Red Sox. He's kidding, right? Two straight stellar outings? What is this, the World Baseball Classic? I might have to quit snarkily referring to him as "Dice-BB." Matsuzaka was masterful Saturday night, working eight shutout innings, striking out nine and only giving up a single hit. He did walk three, but that's not awful for eight innings. He retired 20 of the last 22 batters he faced. Don't look now, but the Red Sox are 9-11 after a 2-10 start. If Dice-K keeps throwing like this, they're going to be in pretty great shape.

3DOWN

Ryan Franklin, Cardinals. The disaster of a season continues for the former star closer. He was booed more loudly than Brandon Phillips by the St. Louis fans and gave up the go-ahead two-RBI single to Miguel Cairo. He wasn't exactly put in a great situation by Tony La Russa with the bases loaded -- seriously, if you remove a guy from closing duties, shouldn't he get some low-pressure outings to build confidence? -- but still coughed up the big blow of the game. Again.

Fausto Carmona, Indians. He was carved up by a Twins offense that has been rather punchless in the early going. Sure, they did have Justin Morneau, but still no Joe Mauer or Delmon Young. And Carmona allowed seven hits and six earned runs in five innings. Worse yet was his four walks and one strikeout illustrate the lack of stuff he had. If the Indians are to prove this start is not fluky, Carmona has to pitch better than he did Saturday. Fortunately for the Tribe, it's only one game.

Jason Vargas and Josh Lueke, Mariners. The A's had been held scoreless for 18 straight innings heading into Saturday night's game with Seattle. Yet by the end of the sixth inning Saturday, they had scored nine times on Vargas and Lueke. Vargas needed 100 pitches to get through five innings, coughing up six hits, three walks and six earned runs. Lueke must have felt bad for Vargas, because he went out and gave up four hits, a walk and three runs in just one frame. Kevin Kouzmanoff, Cliff Pennington and Coco Crisp -- good guys and all, but hardly murderer's row -- did most of the damage for the A's.

BONUS UP and DOWN: Brandon Lyon, Astros. Lyon entered the game in the ninth inning with the task of holding onto a one-run Astros lead. He didn't. A Prince Fielder RBI double tied the game and Lyon had blown a save. He was left in the game, however, into extra innings and even took an at-bat -- one in which he doubled himself. He then closed the door in the 10th and earned the back-door victory. Not a bad night, but blowing saves isn't exactly good. Definitely interesting.

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Posted on: March 17, 2011 12:00 am
 

Getting to know the Cardinals

By C. Trent Rosecrans

MVP

Sure, it seems like a cop-out or too obvious, but how is any talk of a Cardinals' most valuable player going to come down to anyone but the best player in the game, Albert Pujols?

Albert PujolsHow good is Pujols? Last season he was second in the MVP voting after a .312/.414/.596 season. He led the National League in home runs (42) and RBI (118), as well as all the majors in runs (115) -- and it was still reasonable to call it a "down" year for him.

Pujols has three MVP trophies so far in his career and it'd be an upset if he didn't finish his career with at least four.

PLAYER ORACLE

Rogers Hornsby played with Buck Jordan for the 1927 New York Giants
Buck Jordan played with Johnny Vander Meer for the 1937 Cincinnati Reds
Johnny Vander Meer played with Minnie Minoso for the 1951 Cleveland Indians
Minnie Minoso played with Jim Morrison for the 1980 Chicago White Sox
Jim Morrison played with John Smoltz for the 1988 Atlanta Braves
John Smoltz played with Colby Rasmus for the 2009 St. Louis Cardinals

Alyssa MilanoPOP CULTURE

Anthony Morton "Tony" Micelli not only had to retire from his spot as a second baseman for the St. Louis Cardinals because of a shoulder injury, but he also lost his wife and then had to swallow his pride and become a live-in housekeeper for an advertising executive in Connecticut.

Sure, it could be a sad story, but in the end, it provided more laughs than tears, even if we never learned exactly Who's the Boss?

Tony Danza played Micelli in the eight seasons of the sitcom that aired from 1984 to 1992. On the show, his daughter was played by Alyssa Milano (right), who took the inspiration from her ballplayer TV dad and has been connected to Major League Baseball for several years. Milano has dated several  big league players, including former Cardinal Brad Penny, along with Carl Pavano and Barry Zito.

Milano isn't just attracted to players, but also the game. In 2007 she was playoff correspondent for MLB.com and in 2009, she wrote a book called Safe at Home: Confessions of a Baseball Fanatic. She also designed a line of baseball-themed clothes for women, sold at MLB.com.

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Posted on: January 10, 2011 9:33 pm
Edited on: January 11, 2011 8:19 am
 

Tigers to sign Penny

Penny While the Tigers are done with their major shopping, there's still a few holes to fill in Detroit.

One such hole is the rotation, as only Justin Verlander and Max Scherzer appear assured of winning a rotation spot. The competition to back up Verlander and Scherzer will be battled by Armando Galarraga, Rick Porcello, Andrew Oliver and Phil Coke. That's not a superb list of names, so the Tigers have been on the prowl for someone they can add.

Buster Olney of ESPN reports that the Tigers are the frontrunners for Brad Penny's services. The two sides have been linked for quite some time now and the pairing makes sense, as a spot in the rotation is there for the taking. Penny would sign an incentive-laden contract coming off a right-shoulder strain. Before suffering the injury, Penny was enjoying a revitalized season for the Cardinals after scuffling in Boston before a late stint in San Francisco reversed his fortunes.

Earlier in the day. Penny himself tweeted that he was going to know his 2010 team by the end of the day.

Assuming Penny stops being married to his straight fastball down the middle, the signing has potential to work out for Detroit.

In other news, the Rockies have agreed to a minor-league contract with reliever Sean White, as the Denver Post reports. White will come to camp to compete for a bullpen spot after pitching just 34 1/3 innings for the Mariners in 2010, posting a 5.24 ERA. White had a 2.80 ERA in 2009 over 64 1/3 innings, and while his whiff and walk numbers did not change, he gave up four home runs in 2010 after just three in 2009 as well as 11.8 hits per nine. No one can survive being hit that hard.

-- Evan Brunell

UPDATE: Jon Paul Morosi of FOXSports.com reports Penny has agreed to a one-year deal worth $3 million with Detroit.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb   on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.


Posted on: December 17, 2010 12:17 pm
 

Tigers interested in Penny

Brad Penny The Tigers are hoping to improve their rotation, and are targeting Brad Penny, Jon Paul Morosi of FOXSports.com writes .

Penny was 3-4 with a 3.23 ERA in nine starts with the Cardinals last season, but was put on the disabled list with a back injury in May and didn't return. He made 30 starts for the Giants and Red Sox in 2009.

The Tigers aren't interested in Carl Pavano, Morosi writes.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb  on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.


Posted on: November 7, 2010 2:46 pm
Edited on: November 7, 2010 5:48 pm
 

Don't feel sorry for Brad Penny


OK, let's get this out of the way. I know this isn't real news, but I'm writing about it for three reasons:

1) It's a slow news day, and everyone is off tracking their fantasy football teams anyway.

2) It gives me an excuse to run a picture of a pretty girl for a change, instead of a grimacing guy throwing a ball with his elbow bending in a physically impossible way.

3) It will make Cardinals fans either laugh or punch something.

See that girl on the left? That's Karina Smirnoff, who is apparently on Dancing With The Stars, not as a star, but as someone they're dancing with. I have never seen that show, because I don't even really enjoy watching people who can dance dance, so I don't figure I'd enjoy watching people who can't dance dance.

Anyway, Smirnoff has announced she's engaged to "Cardinals pitcher" Brad Penny. The reason that's in quotes is because he only "pitched" nine times as a member of the Cardinals, and in May he and his one-year contract were shut down for good with a strained lat. This is a bit of a sore point for Cardinals fans.

So, to recap: Penny has spent the past six months getting rubdowns on a training table for a living while drawing a $7.5 million salary and dating a hot dancer. Oh, also, it bears mentioning that Penny has in the past reportedly dated Alyssa Milano and Eliza Dushku.

Yeah, that last part definitely made a Cardinals fan somewhere punch something.

-- David Andriesen

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Category: MLB
Posted on: October 13, 2010 6:33 pm
Edited on: October 19, 2010 11:56 am
 

R.I.P. Pirates: 18 losing seasons and counting

As the sports world waits for the crowning of a champion, 22 other teams are busy preparing for spring training. What went wrong for these teams, and what does 2011 hold? MLB Facts and Rumors here at CBS Sports will be answering those questions through all of October. Now: the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Oh, Pirates. So sad. But hey, you've got one of the best ballparks in Major League Baseball, maybe one day you'll have a real major league team.

WHAT WENT WRONG

Where to start?

Well, let's avoid the debacle that was the Akinori Iwamura trade, and go straight to the biggest problem.

The Pirates' starting rotation was Paul Maholm, Zach Duke, Jeff Karstens, Ross Ohlendorf and Charlie Morton -- each lost at least 10 games. Now, I know we're smart enough here not to judge a pitcher based solely on his W-L record. But all but Ohlendorf had an ERA+ of 83 or lower. That ain't good.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

James McDonald Several young players showed glimpses of being productive big leaguers in the future. Pedro Alvarez, Jose Tabata and Neil Walker (pictured, lower right) join Andrew McCutchen as a lineup that can play.

How about the trade of Octavio Dotel and cash to the Dodgers for right-hander James McDonald (pictured, left)? McDonald, 25, started 11 games for the Pirates after the trade and went 4-5 with a 3.52 ERA. McDonald has impressive stuff and is one of the few strikeout pitchers on the roster.

HELP ON THE WAY

Stop me if you've heard this one before, but the Pirates do have some good, young talent. Unfortunately, not much of it is ready for the big leagues.

One of the few that could help soon is Bryan Morris, a 23-year old right-hander who went 6-4 with a 4.25 ERA at Double-A Altoona.

There will certainly be players to watch in the team's minor league system, but it'll be in the lower levels in guys like Jameson Taillon, Stetson Allie and Luis Heredia.

Neil Walker EXPECTATIONS FOR 2011

It's the Pirates, the expectations don't change. There are none besides playing 81 home games.

SUGGESTIONS FOR 2011

Oh, how about this crazy idea. You know that money you get from other teams in revenue sharing? Why not spend it on players? Radical, right?

Now, who do you sign? Right now you go for bargain innings-eaters. Maybe someone like Kevin Millwood or Brad Penny. They're not great, but they can be had and could stick around a little longer.

It's not like Carl Crawford is going to sign in Pittsburgh, but that's not the type of player the Pirates need to target at this point, instead it's filler until the real talent comes along.

2011 PREDICTION

The Pirates will record their 19th consecutive losing season and finish at the bottom of perhaps the weakest division in baseball once again.

Check out the rest of the R.I.P. reports here .

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .



Posted on: September 16, 2010 10:57 pm
Edited on: September 16, 2010 10:57 pm
 

Cards GM says Rasmus won't be traded

Colby Rasmus Cardinals general manager John Mozeliak told fans at the team's Social Media Night that the team has "no interest" in trading disgruntled center fielder Colby Rasmus and that the position is "locked" for the Cardinals in 2011.

He also said he expects payroll to rise in the next three years and that he hopes Tony La Russa's status will be resolved early in the winter.

Rasmus requested a trade in July, a request the Cardinals didn't honor then and apparently won't this offseason, either.

"A lot of times players, out of frustration or for whatever reason, may go into a meeting and come out saying some things they may regret," Mozeliak said (via MLB.com's Matthew Leach ). "But a lot of times, you have to understand, these things never get out there. In this particular case, it's been festering for a while. But I can assure you, Colby's not  going to be treaded. I can assure you that some of the things he's dealing with are typical growing pains that young players go through. When I look at the talent he brings to the table, and when I think about how I could replace that, I realize that would be a very difficult task ahead."

As for the payroll, the Cardinals don't have much flexibility to go anywhere but up when it comes to the team's nearly $100-million payroll, especially if the team agrees to an extension with Albert Pujols.

The only big salary coming off the books is Brad Penny, who made $7.5 million this season. Kyle Lohse and Adam Wainwright are also scheduled for bumps in salary.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .


Posted on: August 1, 2010 10:28 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 12:28 pm
 

Trade market still open


Adam Dunn Everyone refers to the last day of July as the "trade deadline" even if it's not exactly accurate. It's officially the "non-waiver trade deadline" and that first part may not roll off the tongue, but it's important. It's the reason why one of the most speculated-about players at the deadline, Adam Dunn, told me July 31 "doesn't mean [anything]" to him.

Dunn should know, in the last year of a two-year deal, Dunn's movement will be speculated upon throughout the next month. He also knows from experience, two years ago the Reds traded him to Arizona after the non-waiver trade deadline.

Waivers are certainly a complication, but deals still get done until the end of the month, when a player has to be on the roster to be eligible for the postseason. So how does it work?

First, most teams put most -- if not all -- their players through the waiver process since you don't have to give up a player who is claimed, you can just pull him off waivers.

Unclaimed players can be traded to any team. Claimed players can be kept, traded or just handed over to the claiming team for nothing but salary relief. That's what happened last year when the Blue Jays put him on waivers, the White Sox claimed him and Toronto was happy to shed his remaining five years for $59.7 million on his contract. So, if some team wanted to claim Carlos Zambrano or Kosuke Fukudome or Alfonso Soriano, the Cubs would likely dance for joy. But that's unlikely to happen (even though I would have said the same thing a year ago about Rios).

Now, if just one team claims a player, he can be dealt only to that team. If more than one team claims a player, he can be traded to the team with the worst record in his league that claims him. If no team in the same league claims the player, but more than one team in the other league claims him, he can be traded to the team with the worst record.

So now with the process out of the way, it's good to keep in mind that this isn't an unusual process. Last season Scott Kazmir, Jim Thome, Carl Pavano, Alex Gonzalez, Brad Penny, Aubrey Huff, Billy Wagner, Jon Garland and Ivan Rodriguez. So who could that be this year?

Obviously, Dunn is still out there. He realizes the real trade deadline is at the end of this month, not the beginning. If the Nationals can't agree to an extension, the Nationals need to get something for Dunn. Based on many of the rumors that were out there, it was hardly surprising he wasn't dealt. Nationals GM Mike Rizzo was asking for the moon and nobody was willing to spend the money to get there. White Sox GM Kenny Williams hasn't exactly hidden his desire for Dunn, and a little thing like waivers won't stop him. However, he'll have to hope nearly the rest of the teams pass on the big man, and that's not likely.

The biggest name that could move would be Manny Ramirez. The Dodgers don't know what they're going to get out of him and could shed roughly $7 million. As CBSSports.com senior writer Scott Miller notes , Ramirez has a full no-trade clause, but would likely waive that to go to the American League and DH. If the White Sox can't get Dunn, Ramirez may be a solid backup option -- albeit a bit expensive.

Andy LaRoche Diamondbacks first baseman Adam LaRoche has a mutual option for 2011 that increases to $9.5 million if he's traded, though the buyout remains at $1.5 million. Kelly Johnson may not get through waivers, but could still be traded. He's arbitration eligible after the season.

The Royals would certainly love for another team to take Jose Guillen and what's left of the $12 million salary for this season. Guillen is a free agent after the season.

Mike Lowell is still -- sorta -- with the Red Sox, but would likely sail through waivers because he's owed the remainder of his $12 million salary this season and nobody's quite sure what they'll get out of him.

The reliever market didn't see much action on Saturday, but Toronto's Kevin Gregg, Seattle's David Aardsma and Colorado's Joe Beimel could be moved before the end of this month.

As for starters, Colorado's Aaron Cook is signed for $9.25 million next season with a mutual option of $11 million in 2012 and a $0.5 million buyout. His annual salary increases by $1 million for each season.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com