Tag:David Aardsma
Posted on: December 30, 2010 6:01 pm
Edited on: December 30, 2010 6:10 pm
 

Hip surgery takes Aardsma off market


The reliever market got a little thinner Thursday with the Mariners' announcement that closer David Aardsma will have surgery next week to repair a torn labrum in his left hip.

Aardsma, 29, had been thought to be available via trade. The team expects him to be ready for opening day, but there's little chance someone will trade for him now with the uncertainty about how the injury will affect him. Aardsma had 31 saves and a 3.44 ERA last season.

-- David Andriesen

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Posted on: December 21, 2010 10:47 pm
 

Rockies searching for relievers

David Aardsma The Mariners are asking for an "impact bat" in exchange for closer David Aardsma, MLB.com's Thomas Harding writes .

Aardsma will be 29 next week. He is arbitration-eligible for the second time this season, making $2.75 million in 2010. Aardsma has 69 saves over the last two seasons since the Red Sox traded him to Seattle in exchange for Fabian Williamson before the 2009 season. Aardsma has a 2.90 ERA since joining the Mariners, striking out 129 batters in 121 innings. Last season he had a 3.44 ERA and struck out 49 in 49 2/3 innings.

The Rockies have been looking for a reliever, but with the Mariners' demand, they're not a fit for the a trade. Aardsma went to high school in the Denver area.

Harding writes the Rockies are interested in Grant Balfour, but he's a Type A free agent and Colorado doesn't want to forfeit a draft pick to sign him. Other possibilities for the Rockies include free agents Jon Rauch, Chad Qualls and Todd Coffey.

Rockies general manager Dan O'Dowd told Harding the team would offer a multiyear deal to a reliever, but only under the "right circumstances."

As for Aardsma, shopping him makes a ton of sense. Closers are currently overvalued and a good one is certainly a luxury for a team that figures to be as bad as the Mariners. Seattle would be wise to flip him for offensive help and save some money in the deal. To do so, thought, they'll have to find a taker. That could be easier near the trade deadline.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

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Posted on: December 16, 2010 9:23 pm
Edited on: December 16, 2010 11:50 pm
 

Rockies on hunt for reliever

Aardsma The Rockies are determined to get a right-handed reliever, but won't dip into the market requiring three-years for middle relievers.

The Denver Post 's Troy Renck reports on Twitter that Colorado has discussed a deal for Mariners closer David Aardsma (pictured), who would likely compete with Huston Street for that honor for the Rockies. Aardsma is eligible for arbitration and could be due around $4 million, which could make Colorado skittish.

That's not the Rockies's only option, though.

Other names include Todd Coffey, Jon Rauch, Chad Qualls and Grant Balfour. Balfour is a Type-A free agent, so would necessitate a sign-and-trade for Colorado to be interested. However, the other names are extremely unlikely to get a three-year commitment, if not two years. Renck feels that the Rockies will land one of the aforementioned names.

-- Evan Brunell

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Posted on: October 6, 2010 5:18 pm
Edited on: October 6, 2010 5:32 pm
 

R.I.P. Mariners: From hopeful to hapless

As the sports world waits for the crowning of a champion, 22 other teams are busy preparing for spring training. What went wrong for these teams, and what does 2011 hold? MLB Facts and Rumors here at CBS Sports will be answering those questions through all of October. Today: The Seattle Mariners.

A new day seemed to have dawned for the Mariners as 2010 approached.

The 2009 season had brought a winning record and a 24-win improvement over the previous year. General manager Jack Zduriencik had added to the offense and stunned baseball by bringing in ace Cliff Lee, who would create a devastating 1-2 punch with Felix Hernandez atop the rotation.

Many in the media picked Seattle as the favorites in the American League West, and if they made it to the postseason with Lee and Hernandez , well, anything could happen.

Oops. Instead of a playoff contender, the Mariners were the worst team in the AL, and featured the least productive offense fielded by any team in the designated-hitter era. After 101 losses, Zduriencik’s master plan was left in shambles.

A National League talent evaluator who watched the Mariners late in the season told ESPN’s Buster Olney “That is the worst group of position players I have ever seen. They make the Pirates look like the '27 Yankees.''

So, yeah, it’s that bad.

WHAT WENT WRONG

What didn’t? They had injuries, poor performances, internal strife and became almost painful for fans to watch as they flailed at the plate.

Seattle scored a horrific 513 runs, 100 fewer than the next-worst AL offense and 75 less than the 105-loss Pirates. It was the lowest full-season run total for a team since the 1971 Padres. Apart from Ichiro Suzuki’s .315, none of the regulars batted above .259.

Milton Bradley, who was supposed to provide the power punch Seattle was lacking, played in just 73 games. He walked out on the team in the middle of a game, went for counseling and said he contemplated suicide.  He didn’t play after July 26 due to a knee problem.

Ken Griffey Jr., the greatest player not only in the history of the Mariners but the history of the city, batted .184 and became so disgusted with his playing time and his performance that he left Seattle without warning in June, reportedly not even calling to let the team know he was gone until he’d hit Montana.

Chone Figgins instigated a dugout scrum by going after manager Don Wakamatsu during a game. Figgins wasn’t disciplined, never even apologized, and Wakamatsu walked the plank three weeks later.

The Mariners traded Cliff Lee in July, and the can’t-miss prospect they got, Justin Smoak, has mostly missed. Another prospect in the deal, Josh Lueke, turned out to have a serious legal problem the team might or might not have known about.

And that’s just a sampling. Basically, this season was an unqualified disaster.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

Well, there was Hernandez and Ichiro and … uh … give me a minute …

By far the highlight was Hernandez putting on an exhibition in domination just about every five days. He led the AL in ERA, innings, quality starts, fewest hits per nine innings, and finished one behind in strikeouts. The shame of it was that he managed just 13 wins, and his offense probably cost him the Cy Young. But he was a pleasure to watch.

Felix Hernandez Ichiro quietly led the league in hits, amassing his 10th 200-hit season in 10 years, the first player in history to do it 10 times in a row.

The Mariners got some promising pitching from Jason Vargas and relievers David Aardsma and Brandon League.

HELP ON THE WAY

On the bright side, the Mariners got ample chance to see their up-and-coming players, looking like a Triple-A team on some days in the second half.

Smoak has all the tools, and there remains optimism that he will put it together. Infielder Dustin Ackley, the second pick in the 2009 draft, is developing, and the Mariners are excited about pitcher Michael Pineda.

But other than Ackley and Pineda, all the young players with the potential to impact the big-league club in the next several years got a shot this season. None of it exactly wowed the Mariners, but there is some hope.
 
EXPECTATIONS FOR 2011

One thing is for sure: They’re not going to fool anyone into thinking they’re contenders again next year. This has been exposed as a team that’s a very long way from contending, and despite a respectable payroll, there’s so much of it tied up in Ichiro, Bradley and Figgins that they will be limited in how much outside help they can get.

SUGGESTIONS FOR 2011

Beyond Ichiro and Hernandez, you have to think the Mariners will consider nothing sacred in their system with the possible exception of Ackley.

The Mariners need help pretty much everywhere. They’re not that “one player away” team that can go grab a couple of high-priced veterans and think it will make a difference. Zduriencik and his staff will have to work smart, and abandon the notion that defense and pitching are enough.

One suggestion I’d make is for the team to emphasize character and chemistry. By all accounts the atmosphere around the Mariners was toxic from early on this year, from the clubhouse to the front office, and it was a factor in the team collapsing when things got tough instead of pulling it together. Giving Figgins a free pass for attacking his manager sent a terrible message, and allowing the situation with Griffey to deteriorate the way it did was embarrassing.

Start with a manager who is going to demand accountability, and give him the best tools you can find to work with.

2011 PREDICTION

It’s probably not going to get a lot better in Seattle next season. The good news, if you can call it that, is that it doesn’t have a lot of room to get worse, either.

Check out the rest of the R.I.P. teams here.

-- David Andriesen

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Posted on: October 1, 2010 9:52 am
 

Aardsma shut down for year

David Aardsma David Aardsma's season looks to be over thanks to a strained left oblique, the Tacoma News reports .

Aardsma, who hasn't pitched since September 19, aborted a game of catch Tuesday after a pool workout didn't go as planned. There's been no progress in his condition since, and with three games left in the season, no point in rushing the closer back.

The 28-year-old brings to a close his second season as closer, logging 31 saves in 49 2/3 innings. Aardsma had 38 in 71 1/3 innings last season. His year was much less effective than his breakout 2009, walking 25 and whiffing 49. Those rates are far off their counterparts of 80 K and 34 BB in 2009 -- and it showed in 2010.

Aardsma got the year off to a tough start, posting a first-half ERA of 5.40 in 28 1/3 innings, whiffing 28 and walking 13. While his control worsened after the break, his home runs dipped from four to one. Couple that with 12 walks and 21 punchouts while also seeing hits allowed dive down from 25 to eight, and his ERA rests at a pristine 0.84 in the second half.

Aardsma likely won't be handed the closer's job at the start of spring training, but his strong ending to the year makes him the heavy favorite to continue to function as Seattle's stopper.

-- Evan Brunell

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Category: MLB
Posted on: August 1, 2010 10:28 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 12:28 pm
 

Trade market still open


Adam Dunn Everyone refers to the last day of July as the "trade deadline" even if it's not exactly accurate. It's officially the "non-waiver trade deadline" and that first part may not roll off the tongue, but it's important. It's the reason why one of the most speculated-about players at the deadline, Adam Dunn, told me July 31 "doesn't mean [anything]" to him.

Dunn should know, in the last year of a two-year deal, Dunn's movement will be speculated upon throughout the next month. He also knows from experience, two years ago the Reds traded him to Arizona after the non-waiver trade deadline.

Waivers are certainly a complication, but deals still get done until the end of the month, when a player has to be on the roster to be eligible for the postseason. So how does it work?

First, most teams put most -- if not all -- their players through the waiver process since you don't have to give up a player who is claimed, you can just pull him off waivers.

Unclaimed players can be traded to any team. Claimed players can be kept, traded or just handed over to the claiming team for nothing but salary relief. That's what happened last year when the Blue Jays put him on waivers, the White Sox claimed him and Toronto was happy to shed his remaining five years for $59.7 million on his contract. So, if some team wanted to claim Carlos Zambrano or Kosuke Fukudome or Alfonso Soriano, the Cubs would likely dance for joy. But that's unlikely to happen (even though I would have said the same thing a year ago about Rios).

Now, if just one team claims a player, he can be dealt only to that team. If more than one team claims a player, he can be traded to the team with the worst record in his league that claims him. If no team in the same league claims the player, but more than one team in the other league claims him, he can be traded to the team with the worst record.

So now with the process out of the way, it's good to keep in mind that this isn't an unusual process. Last season Scott Kazmir, Jim Thome, Carl Pavano, Alex Gonzalez, Brad Penny, Aubrey Huff, Billy Wagner, Jon Garland and Ivan Rodriguez. So who could that be this year?

Obviously, Dunn is still out there. He realizes the real trade deadline is at the end of this month, not the beginning. If the Nationals can't agree to an extension, the Nationals need to get something for Dunn. Based on many of the rumors that were out there, it was hardly surprising he wasn't dealt. Nationals GM Mike Rizzo was asking for the moon and nobody was willing to spend the money to get there. White Sox GM Kenny Williams hasn't exactly hidden his desire for Dunn, and a little thing like waivers won't stop him. However, he'll have to hope nearly the rest of the teams pass on the big man, and that's not likely.

The biggest name that could move would be Manny Ramirez. The Dodgers don't know what they're going to get out of him and could shed roughly $7 million. As CBSSports.com senior writer Scott Miller notes , Ramirez has a full no-trade clause, but would likely waive that to go to the American League and DH. If the White Sox can't get Dunn, Ramirez may be a solid backup option -- albeit a bit expensive.

Andy LaRoche Diamondbacks first baseman Adam LaRoche has a mutual option for 2011 that increases to $9.5 million if he's traded, though the buyout remains at $1.5 million. Kelly Johnson may not get through waivers, but could still be traded. He's arbitration eligible after the season.

The Royals would certainly love for another team to take Jose Guillen and what's left of the $12 million salary for this season. Guillen is a free agent after the season.

Mike Lowell is still -- sorta -- with the Red Sox, but would likely sail through waivers because he's owed the remainder of his $12 million salary this season and nobody's quite sure what they'll get out of him.

The reliever market didn't see much action on Saturday, but Toronto's Kevin Gregg, Seattle's David Aardsma and Colorado's Joe Beimel could be moved before the end of this month.

As for starters, Colorado's Aaron Cook is signed for $9.25 million next season with a mutual option of $11 million in 2012 and a $0.5 million buyout. His annual salary increases by $1 million for each season.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

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Posted on: July 31, 2010 3:48 pm
 

Mariners demote Smoak

Justin Smoak
It's hard to imagine things being any worse in Seattle, where the Mariners need to win Saturday night to avoid setting a record for most losses in a month in franchise history (which is saying something -- this is a franchise that has been through some rough months).

Now first baseman Justin Smoak, the centerpiece of their trade of Cliff Lee, the future cornerstone of the offense, is headed to Triple-A. Smoak was batting just .209 as a Ranger, and has been digging new depths at the plate since the trade. His Seattle numbers are truly ugly: .159/.169/.270.

He's been getting some time off as manager Don Wakamatsu talks about trying to relieve some of the pressure on him, and this move would signal that Smoak is really feeling the heat -- unless it would damage him mentally, there's zero downside to letting Smoak play out the season for a team that's beyond dead, no matter what his numbers are. Smoak has been working on some adjustments to his swing, and the Mariners apparently think he's better off doing that on the smaller stage (and against the lesser pitching) of Triple-A.

Also Saturday, the Mariners placed Milton Bradley on the disabled list. He's been battling a sore knee.

The moves could signal that the Mariners were clearing roster room for a potential trade (they've talked about moving Jose Lopez, David Aardsma and Brandon League), but they immediately replaced Smoak and Bradley on the roster with Sean White and Matt Tuiasosopo.

-- David Andriesen

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Posted on: July 21, 2010 2:17 pm
Edited on: July 21, 2010 3:32 pm
 

Trade deadline buyer: Los Angeles Angels

As the July 31 non-waiver trade deadline looms, the CBS Facts & Rumors team will look at the biggest players leading up to the deadline. This week we'll look at the teams who will be talked about the most; next week will be the players who might be moved.
Tony Reagins
The Angels are talking a lot of big talk about having the resources to get whatever is needed to overtake the Rangers -- who have added Cliff Lee and show no signs of slowing down -- in the American League West. So far, however, it hasn't amounted to more than talk. If Tony Reagins doesn't improve this team in the next couple of weeks, expect heavy criticism in L.A.

Record: 51-45, five games behind Texas and three ahead of Oakland in the AL West. Third in AL wild-card race, 6 1/2 games behind Tampa Bay.
General manager: Tony Reagins, third year
Expectations: High. The Angels are outspending Texas by $50 million in payroll and winning despite injuries and underperforming players. Nothing short of the playoffs will be acceptable.
Payroll status: Opening day payroll was over $105 million, eighth-highest in baseball, and the Angels already have more than $80 million committed for next year.

What they need

Bullpen help:
The Angels have been living on the edge in the late innings, and their bullpen has a 4.48 ERA, 12th in the AL. They haven't had anybody step up -- only Fernando Rodney (3.29) has an ERA under 3.80.

Starting pitching: The Angels are ninth in the AL in starters' ERA, and would like to at least find a fifth starter with nothing panning out in-house. They traded for Scott Kazmir at last season's deadline and he has been awful (and is now on the DL).

A bat: When first baseman Kendry Morales suffered his infamous celebratory injury, breaking his leg and knocking himself out for the year, it was a big
blow to the Angels' offense. If they are going to make a big move, it's probably going to be for a first baseman or third baseman with pop.

Who may fit

Derrek Lee Starting pitcher:
Not many teams could take on Roy Oswalt's contract, but the Angels -- cash-rich and prospect-poor -- might be a decent fit. Dan Haren would look good in Anaheim, but the Angels might not have the "wow" package the Diamondbacks say it would take. More likely than going ace shopping would be going to get someone like Kyle Farnsworth or Jake Westbrook.

Reliever: The market for relievers is not good. The Angels might be left to pick over the Toronto bullpen and decide whether they want Scott Downs, Jason Frasor or Kevin Gregg. David Aardsma is available in Seattle, or they could try to pry Royals closer Joakim Soria.

Bat: It's conceivable the Angels could be in play on any of the big names. First basemen Derrek Lee, Prince Fielder and Lance Berkman could be had for a price. That might seem short-sighted, given that Morales will be back next year, but the Angels are under the gun. They might be better off going after someone to play third, where the Angels don't have a good long-term option, but the crop there is less impressive. Or despite Adam Dunn's insistence that he doesn't want to be a DH, the Angels could get him and make him do it anyway.

Trade chips

Mike Trout Here's the biggest problem the Angels face: The cupboard is seriously bare in the upper minors. On Sunday, they used Paul McAnulty (called up July 4) to pinch-hit in extra innings, then designated him for assignment after the game. That's how thin they are -- guys they're calling up to help are throwaways.

At a minimum, the Angels are going to have to part with switch-hitting Triple-A catcher Hank Conger, who's batting .265 at Salt Lake City. There's also Triple-A first baseman Mark Trumbo, who hits a lot of homers but strikes out a lot.

Of course, the Angels do have one monster prospect in outfielder Mike Trout at Class A, but he's considered a potential superstar and it's tough to see them giving him up even under the current win-now pressure.

Predictions


The Angels will find a way to get one of the big bats and add at least one reliever. Reagins is going to have to gut what's left of his farm system to do it, so he'd better hope it works.

-- David Andriesen

More trade deadline chatter -- Buyers: New York Yankees ; Sellers: Florida Marlins

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com