Tag:David Wright
Posted on: September 21, 2011 9:53 am
 

Pepper: Mets might change Citi Field dimensions



By Matt Snyder


A common refrain since the Mets moved into Citi Field is that the outfield dimensions cost the team loads of home runs in each given season. Notably, it's been discussed how many homers have turned into doubles for David Wright by several different New York reporters. Only Kauffman Stadium (Royals) and AT&T Park (Giants) have been worse for home runs this season and Citi Field ranked 27th in homers last season.

Two areas in particular that have drawn malign are the height of the left-field wall (why not have it the same height as the center-field wall?) and the well in right field (where it says "Modell's"). It feels like changing those two things would make it a pretty average ballpark for hitters.

Well, changes could be on the horizon, and not-so-small changes at that.

“If we do something, it won’t be subtle,” general manager Sandy Alderson said (NYTimes.com Bats blog), noting that changes are not definite but the Mets are looking hard at several different options.

“We’re not looking necessarily to gain an advantage with respect to home runs versus visitor’s home runs,” Alderson said (NYTimes.com Bats blog). “But at the same time, I think there is some sense that the park is a little more overwhelming to a team that spends half its time there, as opposed to a team that comes in for three games, doesn’t really have to alter its approach or think about it too much and leaves.”

I tend to agree with him. All things equal, I'd much rather have my team playing in a league-average ballpark instead of an extreme-hitter or extreme-pitcher park. Not that it definitely determines the fate of your ballclub -- it doesn't -- but if either pitchers or hitters collectively believe they're getting screwed for 81 games, it's hard to keep a positive mentality for the whole season.

'Fan' is short for 'fanatic:' A Yankees fan had the task of serving Red Sox starting pitcher Erik Bedard with child support papers Tuesday and relished in it. He wore a Yankees shirt and bragged on Facebook that he intentionally served Bedard on a day of his start (Big League Stew). Bedard went out and gave up five hits and four runs (though only one was earned) in 2 2/3 innings. Let's hope this fan never accuses any player of lacking professionalism, or else we've got a nice case of hypocrisy working.

Lincecum endorses Kershaw: The NL Cy Young vote is going to be quite competitive, with Clayton Kershaw, Ian Kennedy and some Phillies likely garnering most of the votes. Two-time winner Tim Lincecum believes the winner should be Kershaw. “Just with the numbers he has, he’s leading in a lot of categories, to put up a 20-win season is huge, especially with the team he’s got. He’s done a magnificent job with his year," Lincecum said after losing to Kershaw again (Extra Baggs). The two aces have squared off four times. Lincecum has a 1.24 ERA in those outings, but Kershaw has won all four.

Harwell's glasses are back: In Tuesday's Pepper, we passed along the story that a statue of late, great Tigers broadcaster Ernie Harwell had been stripped of its glasses. Well, the replacement set of frames is back at home (Detroit Free-Press). Let's hope these stay there for a while.

Aramis' swan song: Third baseman Aramis Ramirez was traded to the Cubs in July of 2003. He played on three playoff teams, in two All-Star games and solidified a position that hadn't been locked down since Ron Santo manned the hot corner. The Cubs have a $16 million option for 2012 on Ramirez and he has repeatedly said he wants to stay, but the feeling apparently isn't mutual. When asked if he believes this is his last run with the Cubs, he replied (Chicago Tribune): "Probably. There's a good chance. I'm a free agent and I don't know what's going to happen. But it looks like I'm going to hit the market."

Movie Night! "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" was a huge hit in the 80s, and it includes a scene in Wrigley Field. It's only fitting that Wrigley's first "Movie Night" will be showing the Matthew Broderick film October 1 (Chicago Tribune). Bleacher seats are $10, while lawn seats are $25. That's steep for a movie that hit theaters in 1986, but would the novelty of sitting on Wrigley Field's playing surface be worth it? You make the call.

No ERA title for Cueto: Reds starting pitcher Johnny Cueto was already suspected to be ruled out for the season, and now he's even admitting as much (MLB.com). With the Reds out of the race, this wouldn't normally matter, but Cueto had a shot at leading the league in ERA. His 2.31 mark currently trails only Kershaw (2.27). The problem is that Cueto has only thrown 156 innings. In order to qualify for an ERA crown, a pitcher must have thrown at least one inning for each game his team has played. So once the Reds play game 157, Cueto falls off the ERA standings.

Rockies love Tracy, kind of: Rockies manager Jim Tracy is signed through 2012 and his job is safe at least through the length of the contract. "Jim is signed through next year, and we'd love to have him be manager here for much longer than that. But I have gone into the last year of my contract here more than you could imagine," general manager Dan O'Dowd told The Denver Post. So that sounds good, right? Well, depends upon the point of view. He's not offering a contract extension, and you'll notice the comment about going into the last year of a contract. So it sounds like O'Dowd likes Tracy for now, but he's giving himself a chance to change his mind by the end of next year. And he has every right to do that.

Watch those Nats: If you relish in the failures of the Nationals, you better enjoy it while you can. I've preached all season that the proverbial corner would be turned soon, with a great young base of talent and lots of money available for free agents. Speaking of which, expect the Nats to be hot after All-Star starting pitcher C.J. Wilson -- who is a free agent after this season -- this coming offseason (MLB.com via Twitter).

Saito can't get healthy: Brewers reliever Takashi Saito has been excellent this season, sporting a 1.90 ERA and 1.18 WHIP. Of course, he's only thrown 23 2/3 innings due to a series of injuries. Now he's dealing with a calf injury (MLB.com).

More roadblocks for McCourt: One of the ways embattled Dodgers owner Frank McCourt plans to get out of his financial mess is to sell the TV rights to Dodgers games for future seasons. Well, Fox holds the Dodgers' TV rights through 2013 and has a problem with McCourt trying to negotiate a deal immediately (LATimes.com).

Johan's progress: Mets' ace Johan Santana continues to work his surgically repaired shoulder back into shape. After throwing a three-inning simulated game Saturday, he's now slated for two instructional league games (Oct. 1 and Oct. 7). (ESPN New York)

Happy Anniversary: On this day 15 years ago, Vladimir Guerrero hit his first career home run (Hardball Times). He now has 449.

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Posted on: September 13, 2011 3:36 pm
 

MLB 'Man of the Year' finalists released

By Matt Snyder

The six finalists for the Marvin Miller Man of the Year Award in Major League Baseball were revealed Wednesday. The award is given to a player "whose on-field and off-field performance most inspires others to higher levels of achievement by displaying as much passion to give back to others as he shows between the lines on the baseball diamond."

Here are the six finalists (via DenverPost.com):
Paul Konerko, White Sox
David Robertson, Yankees
Troy Tulowitzki, Rockies
Adam Wainwright, Cardinals
David Wright, Mets
Michael Young, Rangers

The award is named after Marvin Miller, who was the executive director of the MLB Players Association from 1966 to 1982. Under his watch, it grew into one of the strongest unions in the country. The award is a "player's choice" award, which means what it says: The players vote on it.

The award started in 1997. Young won the award in 2008, so he could join John Smoltz and Jim Thome as the only two-time winners. Brandon Inge of the Tigers won last season -- the second consecutive Tigers' player to win it, as Curtis Granderson won in 2009, his last season in Detroit. Torii Hunter and Albert Pujols are the other active players who have won the award before.

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Posted on: September 11, 2011 12:17 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Sanchez dazzles in one-hitter

Sanchez

By Evan Brunell


Anibal Sanchez, Marlins: Sanchez twirled a gem, throwing a complete-game shutout and allowing just one hit and three walks while punching out 11. All in all, it was a stellar performance for the oft-injured right-hander, whose ERA dipped to 3.64. Sanchez's talent is undeniable -- the issue comes with actually staying on the field. Given he's done that for two straight years so far, it's time to look at Sanchez as a legitimate pitcher and one who could be in line for a big payday as a free agent after 2012.

Chris Heisey, Reds: In a losing effort, Heisey cranked two home runs with a solo blast in the third before beginning a run of three consecutive blasts by Cincy in the fifth. It's the third time this season Heisey has tallied two homers in a game, and went 3-for-4 with three runs scored in his latest such game. Now batting .251/.306/.451, Heisey is putting himself in great shape to start next season as the left fielder, assuming Yonder Alonso doesn't stay at the position.
 
Alex Rios, White Sox: Rios delivered a walkoff grand slam in the 10th inning to dip Cleveland below .500. It was the only hit of the game for Rios, but it was a fantastic one. Unfortunately, it's going to be the highlight of the season by far for the center fielder, who is rocking a .222/.258/.332 line. It was Rios' first career slam, and Chicago's first walkoff homer of the year. Thanks to his contract, though, Rios should get every chance to win and hold down the center field job next season.



David Wright, Mets:  Bobby Parnell wasn't exactly great either, and Wright did contribute two hits, but he also made two errors in the game. The second error came in the ninth when the Cubs rallied off of Parnell. Wright's error allowed the first batter of the inning, Geovany Soto, to reach base and it was all downhill from there as New York committed a total of four errors. That's the most the team has committed since last August. "It's no one person's fault that you lose a game," Wright told the Associated Press. "Collectively there's a lot of things we could have done to win this game."

Yoshinori Tateyama, Rangers:  It was a brutal night for Tateyama, who gave up a pinch-hit grand slam to Scott Sizemore after entering the game with the bases loaded. He followed that up by allowing a RBI double before being lifted from the game with an ERA all the way up to 4.71. The last batter the righty faced, which came on Sept. 3, also hammered a grand slam, meaning Tateyama gave up back-to-back slams. His ERA was 3.46 prior to these two slams, and 2.37 on Aug. 23 as he continues to spectacularly implode down the stretch.

Bronson Arroyo, Reds: The nightmare season for Arroyo continues, as he was lit up for six earned runs over just one inning, running his ERA to 5.28, which would be his worst mark since his rookie season of 2000, when he posted a 6.40 ERA in 71 2/3 innings. The following year is his only other time with an ERA north of 5.00. It's a remarkable turn of events for Arroyo, who had been one of the most durable pitchers in his time with Cincy, racking up six straight seasons (the first in Boston) of 200 innings pitched. Arroyo now has allowed 40 homers on the year, tying him with Eric Milton for the franchise record. The MLB record is held by Bert Blyleven, with 50 bombs allowed.

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Posted on: September 3, 2011 11:16 am
 

On Deck: Lincecum/Kennedy battle highlights day

On Deck

By Evan Brunell


Follow all games live with CBSSports.com's GameTracker.

DiamondbacksGiantsNL West battle continues: The Giants stopped Arizona from winning its 10th straight game and also pulled to within five of the division lead. San Francisco needs to do much more than that to have any hope of winning the division, though, and will turn to ace Tim Lincecum and his 2.58 ERA to try to hold 'Zona back. But Ian Kennedy is a tall order to face, as he holds a slim 3.03 ERA and is also angling to become the NL's first 18-game winner. He's only coughed up one run in his last two starts, punching out 15. It's shaping up to be quite a pitcher's duel. Diamondbacks vs. Giants, 9:05 p.m. ET

WeaverWeaver takes mound: The Angels slipped to 4 1/2 back in the AL West after Friday's games, but can try to make up some ground on Saturday if Jered Weaver can silence the Twins, which shouldn't be too tall of a task.The Rangers have to fall to Boston for a full game to be made up, but L.A. will take winning their own game. Weaver, winner of six straight, will oppose Brian Duensing a night after the Twins pasted the Angels 13-5 to win their second straight. The Twins haven't won three games or more in a row since July 5, and that's a mark that might stand as they stare at Weaver's 2.28 ERA and wonder what they're supposed to do. Twins vs. Angels, 9:05 p.m. ET

MiloneDebut: The Nationals are shuffling their rotation for September to get a look at their minor-league players. One of these pitchers draws the ball Saturday, as Tom Milone makes his big-league debut against the Mets. Milone had a 3.22 ERA for Triple-A this year, punching out 155 and walking 16 in 148 1/3 innings, strong numbers despite not being considered a heralded prospect. He'll have to face a streaking David Wright, who is hitting .500 over his last 26 at-bats and has hit the Nats well as of late. Wright will be manning the hot corner at third behind Dillon Gee. The Mets have won seven of eight. Mets vs. Nationals, 7:05 p.m. ET

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Posted on: August 18, 2011 10:06 am
 

Pepper: Down to two races?



By C. Trent Rosecrans

With just more than a month to go, we're down to just two races in baseball -- the National League West and the American League Central.

The rest? Done. Decided.

The National League East? The Phillies lead the Braves by 8 1/2 games. Done.

The National League Central? The Brewers are up on the Cardinals by seven, winning 19 of their last 21 and watching as the Cardinals take another September siesta. Done.

The National League wild card? It's the Braves to not just lose, but to give away in spectacular Cubian fashion. That's not happening. Done.

The American League East? Boston trails by a half-game, so the division is up in the air, but with Boston leading the Wild Card by eight games, both teams are playing in October, all that's left is figuring out seeding, the important stuff? Done.

The American League West? Texas has won its last six, including the last three in Anaheim against the Angels. Done.

At least we have the NL West and the AL Central -- those will at least be interesting for a while.

Looking back at last year at the same time, the Braves led the Phillies in the NL East, but both ended up in the playoffs. In the AL East, The Yankees and Rays were deadlocked atop the division, but again, both went to the playoffs. Sound familiar?

Minnesota had a four-game lead over the White Sox in the AL Central, a lead they'd hold, while the Rangers were running away from the Angels with an eight-game lead. Deja vu.

As for the NL Central? Cincinnati was leading the Cardinals by just two games, but St. Louis would fade down the stretch. And in the NL West, the Giants trailed the surprising Padres by five games.

Basically, it looks like we've seen this all before. But you know what? It was pretty fun to watch last year and it will be again this year.

Brewers confident: After Tuesday's win, Brewers outfielder Nyjer Morgan said the team has to "try to catch Philly," according to the Associated Press. "That's our goal, since we have nobody to really chase in our division, let's go chase Philly." After Wednesday's win, Zack Greinke said, "It's definitely not locked up now, but it's on us mainly," according to the Journal Sentinel. And he added, "it is ours to lose." It is indeed.

Giants' road to repeat: The Giants have the easiest remaining schedule among contenders, Yahoo's Jeff Passan writes as he breaks down the remaining schedules for the contenders (and the Cardinals, Rays and Angels). Passan also gives the Brewers more reason to be confident -- the third-easiest remaining schedule, plus the most off days and more home games than road games remaining. As for the AL Central, the Tigers have the best remaining schedule among the contenders. And not only are the Rays well behind both the Red Sox and Yankees in both the division and the wild card, they also have the toughest remaining schedule -- 10 against Boston, six against New York, six against Texas and four against Detroit.

Some people are just jerks: And online, they all have a voice. Randy Galloway of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram has proof -- sharing the emails he's gotten from people against the proposed statue of Shannon Stone and his son.

Logic may prevail: Although there were reports this weekend that Cubs general manager Jim Hendry's job was safe, but Sports Illustrated's Jon Heyman says that's not so certain. What you can blow $251.5 million on Carlos Zambrano, Milton Bradley, Alfonso Soriano and Kosuke Fukudome and have to worry about your job? Say it ain't so.

Five tool players: Every year I look forward to Baseball America's Tools issue -- and I got it in the mail yesterday. It's fascinating reading and also allows you to geek out about minor league players and what they could become. Over at FanGraphs, they feel the same way, but Carson Cistulli decided to find out which big leaguers have displayed five tools through the "nerdiest possible" numbers. It's great stuff. And if you didn't know, Chase Utley, Troy Tulowitzki and David Wright are good.

Speaking of tools: Former Reds and Nationals GM Jim Bowden never saw a tools-y player he didn't like. He has five players you should give up on -- starting with the Pirates' Pedro Alvarez. [ESPN.com]

CC's history lesson: Yankees starter CC Sabathia spent Tuesday morning at the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City, saying he drew inspiration from the visit for his start on Thursday in Minnesota. If you're ever in Kansas City, make sure you make it to the museum either before or after you go to Arthur Bryant's. [New York Times]

Tony Plush's kitty kat: Good for Brewers outfielder Nyjer Morgan, who adopted a new cat from the Wisconsin Humane Society. [Twitter]

Dim your jacket: Tuesday night the umpires working the A's-O's game had to ask two men with LED equipped clothing behind the plate to dim their wares. [Yahoo!'s Big League Stew]

Extending Ichiro?: Geoff Baker of the Seattle Times makes the argument against the Mariners extending Ichiro's contract.

Passport problems: Royals outfielder Jeff Francoeur will use his off day on Monday to get a new passport -- his old one expired after 10 years and he forgot about it. The Royals are scheduled to go to Toronto later that day. [Kansas City Star]

Hat flap: The National wanted to wear military hats in Tuesday's game, but Major League Baseball denied their request. Instead, the Nationals wore the hats during batting practice. The main reason? Well, ignore the jibber-jabber from MLB, it's that there was no money to be made, so they didn't want to do it. MLB told the Washington Post that it prefers to for teams to use patches or batting practice for such displays. [Washington Post's DC Sports Bog]

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Posted on: July 28, 2011 11:47 pm
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Wright powering Mets



By Matt Snyder


David Wright, Mets. The Mets completed a four-game sweep of the Reds with a 10-9 victory Thursday afternoon, and Wright went 3-5 with two runs and an RBI. Since coming off the disabled list, Wright is scorching hot, as he's gone 15-33 (.455) with three doubles, two home runs and 12 RBI. The Mets are 5-2 in that seven-game span and -- don't look now -- trail the Braves by 6 1/2 games in the Wild Card race. Maybe they should've kept Carlos Beltran?

Mark Trumbo, Angels. The Angels roughed up the Tigers' pitching staff to the tune of 12 runs on 17 hits. The rookie Trumbo got things started in the second with a two-run homer and ended the game with five RBI. He ended up a single shy of the cycle on his 3-5 day. The Angels kept pace with the Rangers and are still just two games out in the AL West.

Wandy Rodriguez, Astros. Granted, the Cardinals were missing Lance Berkman, but Rodriguez likely upped his trade value a bit in his last start before the non-waiver deadline. He worked seven innings in a 5-3 win, allowing just five hits and one earned run. He struck out six and walked only one. The best part? He worked on top. He threw a first-pitch strike to 22 of the 26 batters he faced (Alyson Footer via Twitter).



A's bullpen. The A's got five runs in the first inning from their anemic offense and also received a quality start from Rich Harden. Yet they still ended up losing 10-8 to the Rays. Craig Breslow, Brad Ziegler and Brian Fuentes had a pretty big hand in the loss. The trio combined to allow five hits, three walks and seven earned runs in the top of the seventh inning. It's pretty tough to win a game when the bullpen coughs up a seven-spot.

Mark Reynolds, Orioles. He's got loads of power, but it comes at quite the price. Reynolds went 0-3 with a strikeout Thursday, while also committing an error at third base when he was unable to haul in an attempted pickoff throw. Only four players in the majors have struck out more often than Reynolds, but he's now the league leader in errors. It's probably time to move him to DH, so only his strikeouts are an issue -- and you can live with those from a guy hitting lots of home runs.

Davey Johnson, Nationals. Was Jim Riggleman really doing that great a job managing? It's probably a mere coincidence -- though the Marlins managerial change has made them into a different team -- but Johnson is 9-17 now as manager of the Nats. They were 39-37 when he took over. After a 5-2 loss to Jack McKeon's Marlins Thursday, the Nats have now lost five in a row and seven of eight. They're 3-9 since the All-Star break and are now in last place by 2 1/2 games.

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Posted on: July 24, 2011 11:35 pm
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Monster day for Upton

Upton

By Evan Brunell

UptonJustin Upton, Diamondbacks
: Justin Upton was a one-man wrecking crew on Sunday, going 4 for 4 with three RBI, two runs, a walk and stolen base as Arizona blanked the Rockies 7-0. Oh, and this came on the backing of a double, triple and two singles. This is coming off a six-RBI game on Saturday, so the 23-year-old is scorching hot and has lifted his overall line to .301/.378/.526 on the season. He's clearly the linchpin of the Diamondbacks' offense, and any chance of Upton being traded has gone up in smoke. (Check out that picture above, where you can see what looks like wood dust coming off the bat. That's power.)

Madison Bumgarner, Giants: Division rival Chad Billingsley actually had the more impressive pitching line on the night, but Bumgarner's 7 2/3 innings pitched with eight hits allowed, one earned run, zero walks and eight strikeouts is plenty enough to carry the day. This is part of a larger trend, as the lefty has whiffed 64 batters in his past 62 innings, ranging all the way back to June 1. He's only walked five batters in this time span with three home runs, so it's little surprise that his ERA has plummeted to 3.56 from 4.06 six starts ago.

David Wright, Mets: The Marlins edged New York 5-4, but Wright was a star in the game, going 3 for 4 with two runs and RBI apiece. He added a double to his two-run home run in the seventh inning to send the Mets up 4-3. He's had two excellent games in the three games he's been back and has gone a combined 6-for-14, with four extra-base hits and six RBI. Not a bad return for the 28-year-old.



DownGio Gonzalez, Athletics: Gonzalez just didn't have it Sunday against the Yankees, getting knocked around for six runs in 4 2/3 innings. The lefty was touched up for seven hits and issued three free passes against just five strikeouts. Two starts ago, Gonzalez also gave up seven runs to the Rangers in just four innings, but only three were earned.  Before Sunday, his worst start was all the way back on April 25, when he allowed four earned runs in five innings to the Angels.The 25-year-old has tossed 120 innings on the year, pacing for 199 2/3. This after throwing 200 innings last season in his first full turn in the rotation. At some point you have to take the gloves off, but is Gonzalez tiring?

Francisco Liriano, Twins: Liriano being his old inconsistent self? Never woulda guessed. In blowups that are all too prone with the talented lefty, Liriano allowed four earned runs in 2 1/3 innings, allowing six hits and four walks while only striking out three. Yuck. The outing sent his ERA to 4.86. How inconsistent is Liriano? Consider his last six games, and I assure your, the pattern repeats itself: 2 1/3 IP 4 ER, 6 IP 1 ER, 7 IP 1 ER, 4 1/3 IP 5 ER, 7 IP 2 ER, 3 2/3 IP 5 ER.

Ubaldo Jimenez, Rockies: In a game in which 20-plus scouts were in attendance, Ubaldo Jimenez gifted five earned runs in five innings -- his worst start since May 27. "It doesn't affect me," Jimenez told the Associated Press of the trade talk. "I know it's time for the rumors and there are going to be rumors. I will just try to go to the stadium and do my thing. Every time I try to get hitters out and what's going to happen is going to happen. You never know, but I am ready for whatever."

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Posted on: July 23, 2011 1:47 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Boomstick produces 8 RBI

Nelson Cruz

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Nelson Cruz, Rangers: Cruz had a career-high eight RBI in Texas' 12-2 victory over the Blue Jays. Each of Cruz's four at-bats resulted in runs scoring. He had an RBI single in the second, a three-run homer in the fourth, a two-run single in the fifth and another in the sixth. Cruz had just one RBI in his previous 11 games

Dan Uggla, Braves: As pinch hitter in the ninth inning, Uggla hit a 3-2 fastball from Nick Masset into the seats to break a tie against Cincinnati, leading the Braves to a 6-4 victory. Uggla has struggled mightily this season, but is starting to come on this month. In July, he's now hitting .279/.362/.639 with six homers and 12 RBI. It was Uggla's first career pinch-hit home run and the seventh homer in the game.

David Wright, Mets: In his first plate appearance in more than two months, Wright hit a double to drive in Justin Turner and give the Mets an early lead over the Marlins, later scoring the team's third run. In his fifth and final at-bat of the day, Wright's eighth-inning double scored Turner again to give the Mets the lead for good. His run on Daniel Murphy's double ended up as the deciding run of the team's 7-6 victory at Florida.


Dusty Baker, Reds: In the second inning of the Reds' eventual 6-4 loss to the Braves, Dusty Baker called for a suicide squeeze. Problem was it was a 2-2 count and Miguel Cairo had to try to bunt a ball that was way low and outside and was only able to foul it off, resulting in the second out of the inning. After an intentional walk to Ryan Hanigan, Bronson Arroyo struck out with the runner still at third. Baker said he thought the scoreboard was wrong and the count was 3-1.

Trevor Cahill, Athletics: Rough night for the A's right-hander at Yankee Stadium, where he gave up nine hits and 10 runs -- all earned -- in two-plus innings. With the outing, Cahill saw his ERA go from  3.16 to 3.77. Cahill pitched to five batters in the Yankees' nine-run third inning, exiting after a Eduardo Nunez singled to put two on with no outs and already three runs in. Michael Wuertz came in and allowed both runners to score before giving up a grand slam that belonged all to him.  Cahill started the season 6-0 with a 1.72 ERA in his first eight starts. Since then, he's 2-9 with a 5.35 ERA. The A's have now lost 11 straight to the Yankees.

Phil Hughes, Yankees: Easily lost in the slew of Yankees runs, right-hander Phil Hughes wasn't very good either. In his third start since coming off the disabled list, Hughes struggled, getting pulled after just 4 1/3 innings, allowing nine hits and seven runs, walking four. Hughes had allowed four runs and 10 hits through 11 innings in his first two starts since coming off the DL.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com