Tag:Delmon Young
Posted on: August 22, 2011 10:50 am
Edited on: August 22, 2011 10:52 am
 

Young looks rejuvenated after trade

By Matt Snyder

Delmon Young is a corner outfielder who was the top overall draft pick in the 2003 MLB Draft. And when the Twins traded him to the Tigers last week, he had just four home runs and a .357 slugging percentage in 2011. Juan Pierre's slugging percentage is .339. Ryan Theriot's is .340. David Eckstein's career slugging percentage was .355. This isn't the type of power production teams look for in a top overall draft pick, someone who should be hitting in the middle of a batting order for a contender.

Well, as it turns out, that's exactly what Young is doing now. In just six games for Detroit, Young looks like the player he was last season -- when he finished 10th in MVP voting with 21 home runs, 46 doubles, 112 RBI and an .826 OPS. In six games for the Tigers -- alert the small sample police -- Young is hitting .308 with two home runs, six RBI and a .538 slugging percentage.

What changed? Did Young simply flip a switch since he's now playing for the first-place team? That's probably not fair. Young is still only 25 and has a ton of talent, so mountains and valleys in production are to be expected. Plus, his new manager, Jim Leyland, has batted Young third every game since joining the Tigers. That means the might Miguel Cabrera is his protection. For the Twins, Young was hitting sixth, seventh and even eighth at times for much of the past three months. And it probably is a ton easier to show up to the ballpark with a great attitude everyday when your team is in first place.

Whatever the reason, Young appears to be back, and he's giving the Tigers a shot in the arm -- likely en route to the AL Central title.

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Posted on: August 15, 2011 4:21 pm
 

On Deck: Rangers can knock Angels out of race

On Deck

By Evan Brunell


Follow all games live with CBSSports.com's GameTracker.

RangersWestern power: The Rangers, winners of three straight, have extended their division lead to four games as the Angels slowly but surely fade into obscurity. With Texas and Los Angeles beginning a four-game series that will expand to seven games over the next two weeks, that fade could quicken if the Rangers can take advantage of the opportunity presented them. The pitching matchup certainly favors Texas, as Alexi Ogando and his 3.22 ERA goes up against rookie Garrett Richards, making his second start sporting an unsightly 10.80 ERA thanks to running into the Yankees for his debut. Ogando's 5.91 ERA over his last four outings is cause for concern.  Rangers vs. Angels, 10:05 p.m. ET

BumgarnerHudsonBest matchup: Madison Bumgarner and Tim Hudson will lock horns in a pitcher's duel on Monday, with the Giants desperate to stay just two games behind Arizona, winners of six straight. Meanwhile, Atlanta has to concern itself with staying atop the wild card race, and the Giants are a prime challenger. The lefty Bumgarner has a 3.53 ERA on the season and struck out 10 in seven scoreless innings against the Pirates last time out. Hudson, he of the 3.18 ERA, has pitched at least seven innings in his last six starts and has a 1.93 ERA over his last three starts. Giants vs. Braves, 7:00 p.m. ET

TwinsTigersChanging locker rooms: You don't see this every day, but Delmon Young headed to Comerica Park on the Twins' bus, then promptly walked over to the Tigers locker room, his new home. Young was dealt to the Tigers in a deal that came down when the outfielder was on Minnesota's bus, and now will bat third for Detroit against the Twins. Minnesota can play spoiler to Detroit, 2 1/2 up on the Indians, behind Francisco Liriano, he of the 5.00 ERA, just seven points higher than Detroit's Rick Porcello. A large reason why the Tigers are atop the division is their 8-1 record against the Twinkies on the year, a trend Detroit would love to continue Twins vs. Tigers, 7:05 p.m. ET

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeonBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed. Information from the Associated Press was used in this story.
Posted on: August 15, 2011 3:11 pm
Edited on: August 15, 2011 3:15 pm
 

Young trade for Tigers is smart move

Young

By Evan Brunell

The Twins announced Monday that Delmon Young has been traded to the Tigers for prospect Cole Nelson and a player to be named later.

This deal comes as a bit of a surprise, doubly so because its an intradivision trade. The Twins have clearly soured on Young, who cost Matt Garza in a multiplayer blockbuster with the Rays prior to the 2008 season. After a successful start to his major-league career as a 20-year-old in 2006, Young faded over the coming years before resurging last year to a .298/.333/.493 mark. He collapsed this year, though, down to .266/.305/.357 despite improving his plate discipline. Most of his downfall this season has come thanks to a disappearance in power, but given his career history in the department, it's too soon to write it off as a new trend, not a fluke. Young is just 25 years old and has one more year of arbitration before qualifying for free agency. He's currently playing under a $5.37 million contract. Coupled with a raise in arbitration, his salary certainly played a part in trade discussions.

It's a bit of a surprise to see Minnesota give up on Young for an unimpressive return, especially given Minnesota is 11 1/2 games out and can -- and should -- build for the future. Playing Young exclusively the rest of the way and hanging into him going into 2012 would have been the smarter move for a club like Minnesota, whom needs to get younger and work on capturing upside. As disappointing as Young has been in a Twins uniform, 2010 aside, he has shown flashes of being a productive major-leaguer and is the type of player the Twins should hold onto, especially with Jim Thome, Michael Cuddyer and Jason Kubel all impending free agents, three spots Young could have filled.

This deal might have made better sense (and to be fair, could still yet make sense) if Nelson wasn't the featured player coming back. Selected in the 10th round in 2010, the giant (6-foot-7) had a 4.87 ERA in 105 1/3 innings for high-Class A, striking out 87 and walking 50. There's a chance the lefty could develop into a mid-rotation starter or solid reliever, but he's far from a sure thing. The deal can better be judged once the player to be named player is revealed, but it's hard to imagine the player being of the caliber to justify the deal as Young is being traded at his lowest value. Minnesota must feel quite strongly that Young is never going to develop into a consistent force to move him to a team Minnesota will be jockeying with next season for the playoffs. It's hard to blame Minnesota as Yuniesky Betancourt is the only player with more plate appearances and a lower Wins Above Replacement (WAR) mark than Young, as Aaron Gleeman points out. That's definitely a disappointing player.

Detroit will certainly find out, though. Young joins a crowded -- but not particularly good -- outfield in Detroit and will receive ample playing time and is reportedly batting third for Detroit Monday night against his now ex-team in Minnesota, as a Twins PR person tweets. Young could be the bat Detroit needs to carry the club to the division title, but even if not, he won't actively harm the team. Detroit can evaluate Young for the rest of the season and if it doesn't like what it sees, can walk away at zero cost after the year by non-tendering Young.

In short, this trade is virtually all upside for Detroit, even if Young has been one of the biggest disappointments in recent history for a prospect, while giving up no one they will miss and the ability to walk away from Young's salary at the end of the year. The Tigers desperately need to find someone capable of carrying this offense into the future alongside Miguel Cabrera, and it could be Young. If not, no harm, no foul. It's tough to see where the Twins are coming from on this one.

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Posted on: July 29, 2011 1:32 pm
Edited on: July 29, 2011 3:23 pm
 

Friday afternoon trade rumor roundup

Pence

By Evan Brunell

Today's the last weekday prior to the trade deadline, which expires on Sunday. Will there be a flurry of activity much like there was Wednesday when Colby Rasmus was part of a three-team deal and Carlos Beltran headed to San Francisco? It's too early to tell, but here's the latest rumors, headlined by Hunter Pence. If you're looking for information on Ubaldo Jimenez, we've broken that off into its own story -- head here and check it out.

HUNTER PENCE

MLB Trade Deadline
Fox Sports' Ken Rosenthal says the Reds are on Michael Bourn, Houston's center fielder. An odd fit, given the team has Drew Stubbs, but Stubbs has been struggling this year and Bourn can impact Cincinnati at the top of the lineup. The team is also in on Hunter Pence, but Rosenthal tabs Pence as the "Phillies' to lose."

On Thursday, a deal between Philadelphia and Houston was so close that Pence was told during the game that night he was being removed due to a trade, as Heyman reports, but he never came out of the game. That's because a potential deal Philadelphia would have engineered with Jonathan Singleton, Jared Cosart and a third piece fell through when the 'Stros wanted Domonic Brown. Both sides are so close, though, it's hard to imagine a trade doesn't eventually happen. Heyman, for his part, thinks a deal will happen if it's Brown and Cosart for Pence.

However, Joel Sherman of the New York Post isn't ready to count out Atlanta. The 'Stros appear to prefer the Braves' prospects, but Atlanta refuses to deal Mike Minor. If that changes, Pence could be a Brave. Will that be enough to keep him out of Philly, a team Heyman says will "do whatever it takes" to get Pence?
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Posted on: June 29, 2011 4:27 pm
Edited on: June 29, 2011 4:41 pm
 

Twins win another 1-0 game

Ben Revere

By C. Trent Rosecrans

The Twins just won another 1-0 game, their seventh overall 1-0 game and fifth victory in a 1-0 contest. Five of the seven games came at Target Field and the only two losses were on unearned runs.

Here's all of their 1-0 games this season:

June 29: Twins 1, Dodgers 0: Scott Baker went 7 1/3, allowing six hits and a walk, striking out 9. Rubby De La Rosa allowed just one run on six hits in seven innings for the Dodgers to get the hard-luck loss. The only run came in the first after Ben Revere led off the game for the Twins with a triple and Tsuyoshi Nishioka knocked in the game's only run with a dribbler down the first-base line.

June 18: Twins 1, Padres 0: Another great start by Baker, who allowed just four hits and a walk in eight innings, striking out 10. Padres starter Tim Stauffer went seven innings allowing six hits, one of them a Danny Valencia homer in the seventh inning.

June 16: Twins 1, White Sox 0: Right fielder Michael Cuddyer homered off of Mark Buehrle in the second for the only run of the game and one of three hits Buehrle surrendered in seven innings. Nick Blackburn gave up seven hits (all singles) in eight innings, walking one.

June 7: Indians 1, Twins 0: In Cleveland, Indians starter Carlos Carrasco held the Twins to just three hits in 8 1/3 innings, while Chris Perez came in for the final two outs. Minnesota starter Francisco Liriano went 5 innings, giving up three hits and an unearned run. Cleveland scored in the fourth when left fielder Delmon Young's throw allowed Carlos Santana to advance to third on his leadoff double, followed by an RBI groundout by Shelley Duncan.

May 28: Twins 1, Angels 0: Anthony Swarzak took a no-hitter into the eighth inning and Valencia's RBI single in the 10th gave Minnesota the victory. The Angels' Jered Weaver allowed just two hits in 9 innings, but Hisanori Takahashi gave up a single in the 10th inning and Jason Repko came in, Takahashi allowing three straight singles to decide the game.

May 3: Twins 1, White Sox 0: Liriano no-hit the White Sox at U.S. Cellular Field and Jason Kubel homered in the seventh for the lone run. Edwin Jackson gave up six hits in eight innings for the White Sox.

April 9: A's 1, Twins 0: With two outs in the sixth, Blackburn gave up a single to Kurt Suzuki who moved to second on a wild pitch and scored on a throwing error by shortstop Alexi Casilla for the game's only run. Minnesota used five relievers, while Gio Gonzalez allowed four hits in six innings for Oakland.

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Posted on: June 25, 2011 8:58 pm
Edited on: June 25, 2011 10:25 pm
 

Young to disabled list with sprained ankle

By Matt Snyder

Twins left fielder Delmon Young had to be carted off the field Saturday night after running into the wall and spraining his right ankle. He crashed into the left field wall at Miller Park on Brewers shortstop Yuniesky Betancourt's inside-the-park home run. Young's ankle appeared to get caught on a part of the wall and turned quite a bit.

The Twins placed Young on the 15-day disabled list immediately after Saturday night's game concluded and recalled Rene Tosoni. The Twins have been snakebitten with injuries this season, seeing prominent members of the team hit the disabled list frequently. This is Young's second stint on the DL.

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Category: MLB
Posted on: June 8, 2011 1:06 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Carrasco steps up for Tribe



By Matt Snyder

Carlos Carrasco, Indians. The reeling Indians brought a five-game losing streak into Tuesday night's game against the Twins -- who had won five in a row. The Tribe had lost 10 of 13 and were clinging to the AL Central division lead by 1 1/2 games over the Tigers. It was a lead that was seven games as recently as May 23. Someone needed to step up, and Carrasco did just that. He threw 8 1/3 shutout innings, allowing only three hits and one walk while striking out six. He did this with no margin for error, as the Indians only scored one unearned run.

Edinson Volquez, Reds. Volquez was demoted to Triple-A for two starts after showing few signs of life in the early-going. Tuesday, he looked like his old self, aside from the absence of the dreadlocks. While he got into trouble a few times, Volquez came through with a really good start. He gave up consecutive doubles in the second and then allowed the Cubs to load the bases, but he left them that way. It was smooth sailing after that, as Volquez didn't allow any Cub to reach second base again. He finished with five strikeouts in seven innings while allowing seven hits, two walks and one run.

Dee Gordon, Dodgers. While Gordon's actual debut came Monday night when he pinch ran late in the game, his first big-league start was Tuesday and he had one to remember. The son of "Flash" is actually the speedy one in the family and gathered his first career stolen base in the fifth inning. The final line was 3-5 with a run and stolen base. The Dodgers got the win, too, so it had to be a pretty satisfying night for Gordon.




Freddy Garcia, Yankees. As bad as the outing was, in which Garcia gave up four runs on four hits and three walks (though one was intentional) and took the loss, the worst part was he couldn't even get through two innings in the first game of a series. There's a full week of action ahead for the Yankees and the bullpen was needed for 7 1/3 innings. That's the kind of strain that can catch up in the next few games. Fortunately for the Yanks, they got a Yeoman's Effort from young Hector Noesi, who got through six innings with 71 pitches. Still, he's now going to be unavailable for the next several days and Garcia shortened the bullpen with his terrible outing. The Yankees now need a deep start from A.J. Burnett Wednesday.

Delmon Young, Twins. On a Carlos Santana double in the fourth inning, Delmon Young misplayed the ball, allowing Santana to take third base. He then scored on a ground out and the Indians won 1-0. We don't know how the game would have turned out if Young didn't commit the error, but that's the problem, no?

David Hernandez, Diamondbacks. The Arizona setup man entered Tuesday with a 1.65 ERA and 31 strikeouts in 27 1/3 innings. Unfortunately this is what can happen with one awful outing for a relief pitcher: Hernandez blew up his own ERA in one night. Worse yet, he blew the game. He was summoned with a 5-3 lead in the bottom of the eighth at Pittsburgh and the Pirates torched him for five runs on four hits. Hernandez didn't even record a single out. He faced six batters, allowing three doubles, a single, a walk and a fielder's choice in which every runner was safe. The ERA now says 3.29.

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Posted on: April 28, 2011 9:56 am
Edited on: April 28, 2011 12:52 pm
 

Pepper: Talking Thursday's pitchers

By Matt Snyder

BASEBALL TODAY: Will Kyle McClellan remain perfect on the season? Can Ryan Dempster get back on track? Will Jon Lester get the Red Sox a much needed win? I joined Lauren Shehadi to discuss some of Thursday's more intriguing starting pitchers.

DISABLED DELMON: Twins outfielder Delmon Young hadn't played since April 18, but was hoping to avoid a DL stint. Instead, he's been unable to to get loose during batting practice and the Twins finally saved and placed him on the DL, retroactive to April 19. That's quite a while the Twins played short-handed, and they've been doing so pretty much all season anyway. At some point, expect their fortunes to turn. It all has to even out, right? (MLB.com )

SLOGGING SOX:
The White Sox have gotten the bad end of basestealing this season offensively and defensively. They've allowed opposing runners to swipe 19 bags in 21 chances while only converting 14 of 30 attempts of their own. That's a vast discrepancy. The latter part of the equation is especially tough to understand with Juan Pierre in the lineup, considering he stole 68 of 86 last season. He's only five of 11 thus far in 2011. Of course, manager Ozzie Guillen had his usually colorful explanation on the matter: "We don't have that many people on base, so maybe we forgot how to run the bases." (Chicago Sun-Times )

THERIOT BACK SOON: The Cardinals don't expect Ryan Theriot to need a trip to the disabled list with his current ribcage injury. He may even take the field Thursday against the Astros. (StLtoday.com )

BELT BACK IN OUTFIELD? One of the reasons the Giants were said to have initially brought Brandon Belt to the majors on the opening day roster was that he was a superior first baseman. Of course, it also pushed Aubrey Huff into right field, where he's a butcher. So when Belt returns, it will reportedly be as an outfielder. He'd likely fit on either corner. The move only sounds like it would be for early in Belt's career, as general manager Brian Sabean said: "We know he can play first base." (SFgate.com )

LOGAN'S CAST: Logan Morrison of the Marlins recently got a cast off his injured foot. He's now selling the cast on eBay with proceeds going to the American Lung Association. That's not all, as he had the cast signed by every member of the Marlins -- except Hanley Ramirez.

CUDDYER ON MINORS: Twins slugger Michael Cuddyer writes a column for FOX Sports North, and in his latest installment he discusses the minor leagues, specifically how much it makes him appreciate the majors. He goes through the differences of each level, specifically how travel, food and lodging all get better with each promotion. I especially enjoyed this part about Class A: "I was only 19 and excited to start my professional career, so I really didn’t mind the six-hour bus ride to Clinton, Iowa. I didn’t mind the Econo Lodge that had a hole in the floor where I could see the room below me. I didn’t even mind the $12 per diem we received for all three meals. I didn’t know any better — I just thought it was great that I got to play baseball every day." (fsnorth.com )

AARDSMA STILL NOT READY: Mariners closer David Aardsma is on a rehab assignment at Triple-A Tacoma. It was his fourth outing, but he still wasn't right -- as he gave up a walk and triple to begin the inning. According to manager Eric Wedge, the Mariners are going to "give him the time that he needs to just get more comfortable being on the mound." (Seattle Times )

CEDENO OUT, WOOD IN: Pirates shortstop Ronny Cedeno was benched Wednesday night for the second straight game and it was said to be a "manager's decision" by skipper Clint Hurdle. Tuesday night, Cedeno entered as a pinch-runner and was caught stealing. Later in the game, he received an at-bat and grounded out to third. He must have thought the ball was foul, because he didn't run it out. Interestingly, the once-touted-now-maligned Brandon Wood got the start at short in each of the past two games. It's early and a small sample, but Wood is showing some good signs. He's hitting .250 with a double, two runs and two RBI. The best news, however, is that he's walked twice and only struck out once, giving him a .400 on-base percentage. (Bucco Blog )

BELTRE SUSPENDED BY Rangers: Yeah, if it was Adrian he'd get his own story. We're talking about 21-year-old Rangers prospect Engel Beltre. What happened was Double-A Frisco of the Texas League had a would-be go-ahead home run overturned and ruled a double in the ninth inning of a recent game. Both the manager and pitching coach were ejected in the aftermath. Then water bottles began to be thrown on the field by fans and a plastic trash can was hurled into the stands by Beltre. “It is definitely not something we condone,’’ Rangers general manager Jon Daniels said. “It is a black eye for all involved.’’ (ESPN Dallas )

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