Tag:Gavin Floyd
Posted on: December 14, 2010 6:07 pm
 

Where do Yankees go from here?

Zambrano Now that the Yankees have lost out on Cliff Lee, who could the club go after?

Well, for starters, the club has agreed to a minor-league contract with Mark Prior. Who knows, it could work out. But probably not.

Good thing there's always Andy Pettitte. The Yankees could up their offer to entice him out of retirement, but even with Pettitte, the Yankees are seeking a strong option for the rotation. Right now, it would be comprised of CC Sabathia, A.J. Burnett, Phil Hughes, Ivan Nova and... who knows, maybe Sergio Mitre?

Carl Pavano is the only starter left on the market that fits the bill. Any other starter would fill in at the back of the rotation, while Pavano would make a strong case to be the No. 3. One problem: The Yankees and the fans have already had their fill of Pavano. However, New York did give Javier Vazquez a second try, so you never know.

Other options reside in trade. There's obviously Zack Greinke, but there are too many reports that New York doesn't have what it takes to acquire Greinke, plus there's far too many questions on whether Greinke would even want to pitch in New York, nevermind if he could.

Other trade options include the White Sox and Gavin Floyd as the club has been willing to listen on the righty. You can bet the ChiSox would also love to listen to deals involving Edwin Jackson as Jackson was only acquired in a desperate gambit to land Adam Dunn from Washington in what remains a curious decision from the Nats in passing. However, is Jackson better than what's left on the free agent market sans Pavano? Mmm... probably not.

The name of Ricky Nolasco is also making the rounds, but Florida has said it has no plans to move Nolasco even with the two sides struggling to agree to a contract extension.

Perhaps the Cubs could be enticed to part with Carlos Zambrano (pictured). It's no secret the two sides are tired of each other, but Big Z has a hefty contract and blew away the competition near the end of 2010, so would require a strong package in return. Still, the Yankees have the money and perhaps the will to pry Zambrano away.

Past that, the Yankees could come calling for Matt Garza or James Shields, although the Rays may not want to deal within the division. Jesus Montero may be enough to change their minds.

Another option New York has is to slot in with an average pitcher and wait until 2012 to make their move for a top starter.

Problem: Unless Philadelphia declines Roy Oswalt's 2012 option, the best starter on the market is C.J. Wilson. And granted, if Wilson repeats his 2010 season, he'll be an enticing name. But that should tell you all there is to know about 2012's free-agent market.

Except there's one very important person in the Pacific that will be posted and could make major waves.

That's Yu Darvish, who has opted to stay in Japan one more season but has essentially conceded he is headed east for 2012. The Yankees -- as well as any other team -- would love to get Darvish's services, and you can bet New York will be hot to trot after the righty.

But so will any number of teams such as Washington and the Angels, so Darvish to the Yankees isn't quite a sure thing. And no, simply expecting New York to outbid everyone in the posting process is not a sure thing. For one, the Red Sox blew the Yankees away for Daisuke Matsuzaka. And second, the Oakland A's not agreeing to terms with Hisashi Iwakuma in what some believe was a gambit to keep him away from the Rangers underscored a flaw in the posting system. That is, you can bid any amount for the player but do not have to pay the fee if no terms are agreed to.

What's stopping Boston from bidding an outrageous $100 million fee (double Matsuzaka's fee) and then just simply letting him walk away?

This much is clear: the Yankees have a lot on their hands to build their rotation now that the Cliff Lee saga has ended.

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb  on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: November 17, 2010 7:39 pm
 

Sale preparing to join White Sox rotation

Chris Sale Chris Sale went from Florida Gulf Coast University to the big leagues in the same season, coming up as a reliever for the White Sox in August after being drafted with the 13th overall pick in June's draft.

He's now looking at making the White Sox rotation next season.

"I feel strong enough to do this," Sale told the Chicago Tribune 's Mark Gonzales on Wednesday. "I shouldn't have to gain 30 pounds."

Gonzales writes that Sale has started a conditioning program to help his stamina and strengthen his legs. The left-hander is 6-foot-6 and 175 pounds, but says he doesn't want to feel like he has to put on much weight to start every dive days.

"I'm not going to get caught up on how big I can get," Sale said. "I want to make sure I'm in shape to start by the start of spring training."

Sale threw 103 innings in college in 2010 and 33 2/3 as a pro in the minors and majors last season.

The White Sox, though, aren't yet set on starting Sale next season.

"Whatever Kenny [Williams] wants to do, we'll do," pitching coach Don Cooper told the newspaper.

Jake Peavy isn't expected to begin the season in the rotation, but the White Sox already have Mark Buehrle, John Danks, Edwin Jackson and Gavin Floyd ready for 2011, and Sale could be the fifth member of the rotation.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.


Posted on: October 14, 2010 5:31 pm
Edited on: October 19, 2010 11:25 am
 

R.I.P White Sox: Never a dull moment

As the sports world waits for the crowning of a champion, 22 other teams are busy preparing for spring training. What went wrong for these teams, and what does 2011 hold? MLB Facts and Rumors here at CBS Sports will be answering those questions through all of October. Now: the Chicago White Sox.

There's one thing about these Chicago White Sox, they're never dull. And that was the case again in 2010 as Kenny Williams and Ozzie Guillen had their own reality show and provided more than enough fodder in an ultimately unsuccessful season.

WHAT WENT WRONG

Jake Peavy The vaunted White Sox rotation never quite lived up to its billing -- Jake Peavy (pictured, left) had his search cut in half with injury, and even before that he was medicore, going 7-6 with a 4.63 ERA. Mark Buehrle, John Danks and Gavin Floyd were merely slightly above average.

The team's hole at designated hitter was only magnified by watching their old flame -- the one they dumped -- marry up, as Jim Thome not only hit 25 homers, but he did it for the division-winning Twins. And then there's Manny Ramirez ... but that's an old story.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

The White Sox went on one of the longest hot streaks of the season, a stretch of 25 victories in 30 games to erase Minnesota's 9 1/2-game lead. But after that, the team just couldn't keep it going and saw its own lead in the division disappear.

Paul Konerko (pictured, below) had a fabulous season, hitting .312/.393/.584 with 39 homers and 111 RBI. (If you're talking about Konerko, it's good for him this season came in the final year of his contract.)

HELP ON THE WAY

The White Sox got a glimpse of the future at the end of the season. Brent Morel played 24 games and didn't put up the prettiest numbers at the big league level, but he could be the starting third baseman next season.

More impressive was 2010 first-rounder Chris Sale. The organization expects the left-hander to start. As a reliever -- in an attempt to limit his innings -- Sale showed the potential of a future ace. Fresh out of a small college, he wasn't intimidated by big league hitters, appearing in 21 games and amassing just a 1.93 ERA. He struck out 32 batters in 23 1/3 innings and walked 10 with a WHIP of 1.071.

Paul Konerko EXPECTATIONS FOR 2011

Since winning the World Series in 2005, it's been title or bust for Williams and Guillen. That's not going to change now.

SUGGESTIONS FOR 2011

The biggest question for Williams will be if he can afford to keep Konerko, a White Sox mainstay. Konerko had a huge year and is a free agent, but he'll also be 35 on opening day and will command a big price tag, plus a multiyear contract. If you're going to spend that kind of money, why not give Adam Dunn a shot? Or, heck, go for broke (which they've been known to do) and sign both. The team certainly wouldn't lack power with a Konerko-Dunn tandem.

It'll be easy to let Bobby Jenks go, but who to replace him as the club's closer? I like Matt Thornton, but I'm not so sure Williams/Guillen is ready to lean no the lefty and take him out of the set-up role.

2011 PREDICTION

The Magic 8 Ball tells us to ask again later, there's too much time between now and April to know just what the White Sox will look like. This much is sure, the White Sox will be interesting, even if it's just the manager and general manager.

Check out the rest of the R.I.P. reports here.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .




Posted on: September 26, 2010 8:59 pm
 

White Sox may shut down Floyd

Gavin Floyd White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen is advocating shutting down Gavin Floyd for the year although the righty still has one more start to make.

"In my mind, I think we should shut it down," manager Ozzie Guillen told ESPN Chicago . "This is a kid that's going to be back here next year and he's not going to prove to anybody if he can pitch or not. I think, 'why are we going to take a risk when the thing is not very important?' 

Floyd left his last start after throwing just seven pitches due to shoulder soreness, so it makes sense to avoid any potential injury and close the books on Floyd's season.

"Obviously we have to talk to Gavin first to see how he feels but I think the best scenario is to shut it down," Guillen added. "That's the best thing for him and for the organization."

Floyd got the season off to a terrible start, posting a 6.64 ERA through his first 11 starts before cleaning up with a 2.85 line in the next 20. Throwing out Floyd's last start with just seven pitches and the two starts prior to that due to getting bombed, and the 27-year-old ripped off a 17-start stretch of a 2.27 ERA.

That stretch of dominance has lowered Floyd's ERA all the way to 4.08 after the brutal start over a total of 187 1/3 innings. Floyd posted a 4.06 ERA in 2009 while displaying the same number of walks and strikeouts, so Floyd's talent level has been well-established. He is in no danger of losing a rotation spot, especially as he finishes up the second year of a four-year, $15.5 million pact.

-- Evan Brunell

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Category: MLB
Posted on: September 21, 2010 10:24 am
 

It's shut-down season

Gavin Floyd Now that we're in the final two weeks of the season, we're going to hear about players being "shut down for the season" -- which may be one or two starts for pitchers.

If a team's out of the playoffs, it's an easy choice. Or if a team's already clinched a spot, it may be more important to get a couple of days rest before games count again.

So, if you're a Royal with a hangnail or a Pirate with jock itch, it may just be best to "shut it down" and get ready for 2011.

The latest to be shut down may be White Sox starter Gavin Floyd. Floyd left Monday night's game after just seven pitches after feeling recurring tightness behind his right shoulder.

Ozzie Guillen said Floyd won't make his next start unless he's "200 percent."

Floyd said to the Chicago Tribune : "Last thing I want is to have this snowball and become even worse. I don't know if anything is going to happen. I feel like it's just soreness. The last thing you want is it to be too bad so the worst-case scenario comes into play."

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .




Category: MLB
Posted on: June 18, 2010 8:13 pm
Edited on: June 19, 2010 1:05 am
 

Strasburg sets obscure strikeout record


Stephen Strasburg So the latest installment in "they keep that record?" -- Stephen Strasburg has set the record for most starts in the first three starts of a career with 31, passing the previous record set by J.R. Richard. He picked up his eighth strikeout of the game (and 30th of his carer) in the fifth inning by getting Alexi Ramirez swinging. He finished the inning by striking out Gordon Beckham on a ball in the dirt. Eight of his nine strikeouts have been swinging strikeouts.

However, the Nationals are down 1-0 because Gavin Floyd has allowed just one hit through five innings.

Strasburg, on the other, has given up two hits, both in the first -- an infield single to Juan Pierre and a blooper by Omar Vizuel in the first. Since then, he's retired the next 15 batters.

As for those who note Strasburg's strikeout numbers have come against the likes of the Pirates and Indians, two last-place teams, the White Sox don't have a winning record, but did enter Friday's game with the fewest strikeouts in baseball.

UPDATE: Starsburg's done after seven innings, striking out 10, allowing one run on four hits with no walks. His ERA now stands at 1.86.

The Nationals scored a run on an Adam Dunn double in the seventh, so Strasburg will get a no-decision.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.
Posted on: June 17, 2010 6:07 pm
Edited on: June 17, 2010 8:14 pm
 

Peavy to meet with White Sox GM


The White Sox's Jake Peavy will meet with general manager Ken Williams to determine his status for this weekend's series at Washington, the Chicago Tribune 's Mark Gonzalez reports .

Peavy told Gonzalez that his right shoulder feels better, but Triple-A Charlotte pitcher Daniel Hudson has been put on the ready to start either Friday or Saturday against the Nationals. Steven Strasburg starts for the Nationals on Friday. The White Sox have yet to name a starter for either game.

"Obviously, it's not my call," Peavy said.

Peavy was scheduled to start on Thursday, but Mark Buerhle will start against the Pirates tonight.

In addition to Hudson, Gavin Floyd will be able to pitch one of those games, with Freddy Garcia closing out the weekend series against the Nationals.

UPDATE: Gonzalez reports Peavy will start Saturday, Floyd on Friday.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.



Posted on: June 16, 2010 6:51 pm
Edited on: June 17, 2010 12:42 am
 

Tired Peavy could be pushed back

Jake Peavy White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen met with general manager Kenny Williams and pitching coach Don Cooper before Wednesday's game, apparently discussing juggling the rotation to give right-hander Jake Peavy some extra rest.

No decision had been announced prior to game time, but the Chicago Tribune reports that if Peavy is given extra rest, Mark Buehrle would take Peavy's scheduled start on Thursday, and either Peavy or Gavin Floyd would start Friday against Nationals rookie Stephen Strasburg.

Peavy complained of a "tired arm" in late May. He has pitched 83 1/3 innings in 13 starts, about 6 1/3 innings per start. That's on par with his workload previously in his career. He is 5-5 with a 5.62 ERA and has allowed 52 earned runs, tied for the most in baseball.

-- David Andriesen

UPDATE: Guillen said after Wednesday's game that Peavy had an MRI that revealed no structural damage, but that Buehrle would make the start Thursday. He didn't say what the plan was for starters Friday and Saturday.

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