Tag:Jorge Posada
Posted on: August 2, 2011 6:39 pm
Edited on: August 2, 2011 6:39 pm

Report: Yankees place Posada, others on waivers

Jorge PosadaBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Throughout the next month, you'll hear every once in a while about players that have been placed on waivers. That doesn't mean your favorite team is going to release a star player, it's just that they're keeping their options open.

With that in mind comes this report from the New York Post that the Yankees have placed A.J. Burnett, Rafael Soriano and Jorge Posada on waivers.

All three are priced high enough that it's unlikely they'll be claimed. None of the three seem to be that appealing in a trade for another team, either.

Burnett is the team's No. 2 starter -- by payroll, if not performance. He has a record of 8-9 with a  4.23 ERA, but makes $16.5 million through 2013. He does have a limited no-trade clause, allowing him to block trades to 10 clubs.

Soriano signed a three-year, $35 million contract before the season to serve as Mariano Rivera's setup man. He's appeared in just 17 games this season and has allowed nine earned runs in 16 innings, while striking out 12 and walking 11. It's unlikely anyone will want to take on his contract, despite his 45 saves last season for the Rays.

Then there's Posada -- who has famously played for nobody but the Yankees in his 17 seasons. Posada is a free agent after the season, but appears headed for retirement. He's hitting just .236/.318/.382, starting 66 games at designated hitter and eight games at first base, all for $13.1 million.

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Posted on: August 1, 2011 1:59 pm
Edited on: August 1, 2011 4:55 pm

Report: Montero on verge of callup to Yanks

MonteroBy Evan Brunell

Hidden in the news about top Yankees prospect Manny Banuelos' promotion to Triple-A is the news that Jesus Montero will be promoted to New York "in the very near future," the Trenton Times reports.

The Yankees do need him at both catcher and DH, spots that Montero can fill in. While his promotion is overdue after hitting .289/.353/.517 with 21 home runs as a 20-year-old in Triple-A back in 2010, Montero did fall off this season when he couldn't come out of spring training with a roster spot. That has contributed to Montero hitting just .283/.342/.429 back at Triple-A, drawing reports that he is "bored," which may have contributed to a recent benching for "lack of energy."

But there's no question that the power Montero flashed last season that made so many teams drool and was almost enough to acquire Cliff Lee is still hiding in his bat. With the Yankees staying pat at the trade deadline, they need to upgrade themselves internally now that Russell Martin has cooled off behind the dish. Martin is hitting .225/.326/.366 on the season in 328 plate appearances, a line that further sinks to .203/.310/.288 in 63 games, from April 27 through July 31.

That just won't cut it, so with the addition of Montero, Martin could start losing playing time. Montero could quickly supplant catcher Francisco Cervelli and enter into a platoon of sorts with Martin provided Montero can keep up his defense behind the plate, which is a significant question mark.

In addition, Jorge Posada's new career as a DH just isn't working out, with nine home runs on the year and a .235/.318/.383 figure. Remember, this is from the DH spot, so he's adding zero defensive value. Here's where Montero can get most of his playing time.

In fact, Posada could be in danger of being released. If Montero is recalled, it stands to reason that one of Cervelli or Posada will lose his job. If it's Cervelli, all of a sudden Martin's two backups are defensively-challenged, and one of them will be starting at DH on any given day. It makes more sense to dump Posada, free up DH for a full-time audition by Montero and leave Cervelli to keep Martin fresh.

Worst case, Montero fails and puts up numbers similar to Posada's. In that case, they're no worse off and can just go acquire a bat at the end of August in advance of the waiver trade deadline.

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Posted on: May 30, 2011 11:43 am
Edited on: May 30, 2011 12:10 pm

Pepper: Could Teddy Roosevelt finally win?


By Evan Brunell

RUN, TEDDY, RUN: "Teddy Roosevelt" has never won one of the Presidents Races the Nats have held since arriving in D.C. Roosevelt is working on a losing streak of over 300 games, but that could change on Memorial Day.

Some major reasons it might change include Jayson Werth's surprising interest in the race. Werth has spoken before about how Roosevelt never gets to win and is disappointed by that fact. He's also been caught on camera disgusted when Roosevelt doesn't win the race. A bit odd, but the Nats have to pay attention to their face of the franchise, who is soaking up over $100 million of Ted Lerner's money. Maybe the Nats should give Roosevelt a victory to placate Werth.

"Roosevelt" tweeted after Sunday's race that he had "a good feeling" about the Memorial Day race, which will come as the Nats hold a fundraiser to benefit the military by allowing those who make a donation to Hike for Heroes to run the bases. It's as good a day as it will get for a changing of the guard, as the actual Teddy Roosevelt has a connection to both the military and Memorial Day. And since no other D.C. sports teams are active on Monday, a Roosevelt victory could land on the front page of the papers. Yes, really. (Washington Post)

: GQ is pulling out a call to decide who the fattest baseball player of 2011 is. Named after Rich Garces, does Garces still deserve the mantle, or will someone like Jonathan Broxton carve out his own legacy? (GQ.com)

POSADA DONE: As a full-time player, that is. Manager Joe Girardi has chosen to permanently sit Jorge Posada against lefties, allowing him to rotate Derek Jeter and Alex Rodriguez in the DH spot, giving them essentially a half-day off. (Lohud.com)

CLOSING TIME: Ryan Franklin isn't giving up on an eventual return to the closer's role in St. Louis. He mopped up on Saturday with 2 2/3 scoreless innings, which represented a major step forward. Next up: Doing more of the same until he proves he can get batters out consistently. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

SANDS OF LEFT: The Dodgers' motley crew of left-fielders hasn't been up to snuff so far this season, but Jerry Sands is hoping to fix a position that has been in flux for L.A. for years with no long-term answer. GM Ned Colletti believes that Sands will be in left for years to come, but his slow start this season suggests he has a ways to go. (Los Angeles Times)

ROUGH RETURN: J.P. Howell, one of the Rays' best relievers over the last several years, is finding the going difficult after missing 2010 and a chunk of 2011 in his recovery from a torn left labrum. In 2 1/3 innings, he's posted an 11.57 ERA -- but that figures to change once Howell gets back into the groove. (St. Petersburg Times)

THE TRAVELS OF BRANYAN: Russell Branyan has been around, as his 11 teams in his career can attest. Check out Branyan's ride through a major-league career in photos. (Orange County Register)

SHELLED: Check out this box score from the Salt Lake Bees, the Angels' Triple-A affiliate. Notice who pitched -- Scott Kazmir, who fell to 0-2 with a 36.00 ERA by giving up 10 earned runs in 2 1/3 innings. Kaz's career has plummeted so far down the rabbit hole it's probably never coming back. (MiLB.com)

COBB TIME: Yet another heralded Rays prospect will hit the majors as Alex Cobb will replace Andy Sonnanstine in the rotation starting Tuesday. It's anyone's guess how long Cobb will stick, but Jeff Niemann isn't anywhere near a return from injury, so Cobb could pick up a few starts. (Tampa Tribune)

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Posted on: May 27, 2011 1:00 pm
Edited on: May 27, 2011 1:29 pm

Breaking player slumps tough job for managers

By Matt Snyder

Just over a week after saying he would leave Adam Dunn in the three-hole, White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen has now dropped Dunn to seventh in the batting order. It's pretty tough to blame him, from a certain point of view.

Dunn is hitting .186 with an incredible 65 strikeouts in 156 at-bats. He's only hit five home runs. Even his traditionally-high on-base percentage is a sub-par .314.

The flip-side, however, is that Dunn has been one of the most consistent power hitters of the past decade. Scoff if you will -- there's a stigma that comes with Dunn because of his high-strikeout, low-batting average rates -- but here are his home run totals from the past seven seasons: 46, 40, 40, 40, 40, 38, 38. He reached 100 RBI in six of those seasons, his OBP was .381 and OPS was .914. He also never played less than 152 games in a season. That's a really productive offensive player.

So, if you're Guillen, you have to expect Dunn to start hitting well any day now. There's just no reason to believe he's cooked at 31. Sure, he switched leagues, but any drop off shouldn't have been this drastic. It's just that if you leave him in the third spot of the lineup and he continues to pump out four-strikeout games, it's killing your team.

This situation is a good illustration of a very tough job for managers. Figuring out how to approach a guy in a huge slump is a delicate business. No matter what action is taken, there are lots of possible negative consequences.

Lineup movement happens a lot. The Marlins have moved Hanley Ramirez to second. The Red Sox dropped Carl Crawford to eighth -- and he's absolutely going off this week, finally.

Sometimes the DH is used. The White Sox have started to play Adam Dunn at first more often, in case playing defense keeps him more into the game. On the opposite end, the Yankees have used Derek Jeter at DH three times.

Do you start benching the guy? The Indians started Carlos Santana behind the plate only once in the three-game series against the Red Sox. Sometimes that helps to clear a player's head, but sometimes he becomes worried the manager has lost confidence in him and becomes a headcase. Look at the Jorge Posada situation in New York.

What about doing things out of the ordinary, strategically? Getting the hit-and-run sign could help. If a hitter knows he has to swing at the pitch, there's a big hole in the infield and he ends up making good contact for a base hit, sometimes that's the only mental boost he needs. The Marlins made an interesting decision with Ramirez Tuesday night. With a four-run lead in the top of the ninth, they had him lay down a sacrifice bunt. I actually have no idea how this will help him break out of a slump, but I guess they're breaking out all the stops.

Or you could just leave the guy alone. Charlie Manuel essentially did this with Raul Ibanez. He rarely sat out and only bounced between fifth and sixth in the order. Now Ibanez has gotten hot after a pretty sizable slump.

Most any blogger will tell you that the managers should just relax and wait for a regression to the mean. I understand that, but it's pretty easily said for a guy behind a computer whose job doesn't depend on wins and losses. Each win is precious, and the managers need players like Crawford, Ramirez, Dunn, Jeter, Ibanez and Santana to hit the ball. The longer they go before breaking out of a slump, the more chances there are the team loses more games. The longer the managers stick with the struggling big hitter in a major lineup spot, the more risk there is of leaving the table-setters on base multiple times every game. Dropping the hitter in the lineup or benching him might mean missed opportunities to break out of the slump, too.

It's quite the juggling act, and there is no one proven method that maximizes results -- probably because the mentality of hitting a baseball is immeasurable. It's pretty difficult to blame managers for trying to be proactive instead of just sitting back. Not when their job is constantly on the line.

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Posted on: May 19, 2011 5:30 pm

On Deck: Posada in lineup, field

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Jorge PosadaPOSADA IN THE FIELD -- Jorge Posada will use a mitt in a game for the first time this season, but it'll be the first baseman's type, not the catcher's model. Posada will start his 16th career game at first base, while Mark Teixeira moves to designated hitter. Posada, for the record, will be batting seventh. Because of Wednesday's 15-inning game, the Yankees didn't take batting practice or infield, which Posada said he'd like to have gotten in advance of his first start at the position (or any real position) this season. Posada played some first in spring training and has been taking grounders there this season. Yankees at Orioles, 7:05 p.m. ET (Watch live)

Andre EthierSTRUGGLING -- Andre Ethier is no stranger to streaks this season, lodging a 30-game hitting streak earlier this season. However, his current streak is nothing to brag about. Over the last five games, he's 0 for 17 with five strikeouts. He's just 1 for 6 in his career against tonight's starter, San Francisco lefty Madison Bumgarner. Ethier is hitting just .235/.264/.314 against lefties this season, with all four of his homers coming off right-handers. Since hitting in his 30th straight game on May 6, Ethier is 7 for 42, hitting .167/.239/.238. Giants at Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. ET (Watch live)

Aaron HarangDR. JEKYLL AND MR. HARANG -- One of the feel-good stories of April was the return of Aaron Harang. Now with his hometown Padres and away from homer-happy Great American Ball Park, Harang looked like the 2006-07 version of the right-hander, going 4-0 with a 1.88 ERA in his first four starts as a Padre. The Next four starts, well, not so good -- 1-2 with an 8.46 ERA. Tonight he faces a familiar foe, Milwaukee, in his new spacious Petco home. Harang is 5-5 with a 4.65 ERA in 21 starts against the Brewers, but he may fare better when some of those Ryan Braun and Prince Fielder shots miss the seats. Brewers at Padres, 10:05 p.m. ET (Watch live)

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Posted on: May 19, 2011 1:13 pm
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Posted on: May 19, 2011 1:04 am

Are Posada's pinstripe days numbered?

By C. Trent Rosecrans

It seems pretty sure this is Jorge Posada's last season as a Yankee, and maybe as a big leaguer. But could his career be over before the end of the season?

According to ESPNNewYork.com's Andrew Marchand, the Yankees are weighing their options on Posda. Although his source, "a baseball official with knowledge of the Yankees' thinking" said the team has had "zero discussion" about releasing Posada since his mea culpa over his argument with manager Joe Girardi, but that could change if he doesn't start hitting.

Jorge PosadaPosada, who didn't play in Wednesday's 15-inning victory over the Orioles, is hitting .179/.287/.366 with six home runs and 15 RBI this season.

As it stands, Posada is just a platoon DH who isn't doing much H. Against a left-handed starter on Wednesday, Girardi once again decided to sit the switch-hitting Posada, who is 0 for 24 as a right-handed batter this season.

The team does have über-prospect Jesus Montero waiting in Triple-A, where he's hitting well, but not great. Montero is hitting .318/.350/.417 for the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees, but has just six walks and two home runs. His May has been worse than his April in all three of the slash categories -- hitting .365/.360/.473 in April and .259/.338/.345 in May. If Montero were putting up Eric Hosmer-like numbers, it could make the Posada decision easier, but at this point, you don't know what you'll get from the 21-year old Montero, who still needs work in the minor leagues on defense.

Say by midseason, this could work itself out if Posada rebounds. But if he doesn't, well, it could be very interesting. If he's still hitting below the Mendoza line, his time in baseball could be short.

What's also interesting is that according to a report from Mark Feinsand of the New York Daily News, Posada and Girardi's bad blood goes deeper than just the recent disagreement of where Posada should bat in the lineup. The report says the two have had issues since 2005 when Girardi was Joe Torre's bench coach and the two clashed over scouting reports.

"Girardi couldn't wait to get him out from behind the plate," the source told Feinsand. "He hated the way he called the game."

Feinsand's source added Posada didn't think much of Girardi's scouting reports while he was the team's bench coach, often deviating from Girardi's plans, while he felt he was being second-guessed by Girardi.

On Monday, Girardi stressed he and Posada have a good relationship, but sometimes these things go deep (like maybe even as far as 1998 when Posada beat out Girardi for the Yankees' catching job) and aren't patched up by a simple apology.

While the lineup flap and Posada's complaints (followed by an apology) have passed, the question of what to do with Posada is just starting. 

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Posted on: May 18, 2011 9:54 am
Edited on: May 18, 2011 9:59 am

Pepper: Peavy, Posada, Pudge and More

BASEBALL TODAY: What should White Sox fans expect from Jake Peavy tonight? Will Jered Weaver get back on track in Seattle? Tony Lee of NESN.com joins Lauren Shehadi with the latest edition of CBSSports.com's Baseball Today.

By Matt Snyder

MORE POSADA-GIRARDI FEUD: Evidently, the Jorge Posada-Joe Girardi issue Saturday night had been brewing for some time -- at least according to the New York Daily News. Reportedly, Posada and Girardi began to butt heads back in 2005 when Girardi was the Yankees' bench coach and Posada was the everyday catcher. Girardi was "heavily involved" in the game-planning in terms of how to work opposing hitters, but reportedly Posada would routinely deviate from the plans during games. So then Girardi would call Posada out, which made Posada angry.

"Jorge felt everything he did behind the plate was being second-guessed by Girardi on the bench," the Daily News' anonymous source said. "The way Jorge called a game was a big issue for Girardi."

The source went on: "Girardi couldn't wait to get him out from behind the plate," the source said. "He hated the way he called a game."

Whether or not this is true, I'm just ready for it to all be in the past. Permanently.

ON THE FLIP SIDE: With the whole Posada drama in New York, Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post takes the time to point out that Nationals catcher Ivan Rodriguez could have very well done something similar considering his role has been severely downgraded this season as Wilson Ramos has taken over as the starter. It hasn't been lost on Rodriguez's teammates, either. “He comes in here, they hit him eighth, he doesn’t say a thing,” one Nationals player said, motioning toward Rodriguez. I believe the difference is that Rodriguez has had to bounce around from team to team, so he's had the chance to be humbled and avoid a sense of entitlement. But that doesn't make Posada right. He could learn a thing or two from one of the best catchers to ever play the game. (Nationals Journal)

SHAKEUP COMING: The Giants' offense is getting to be more and more of an issue with each passing day, as they've now scored the least amount of runs in the National League. There's talk of a shakeup coming with the starting lineup, specifically the infield, in an attempt to get more offense. In fact, the Giants might recall Brandon Belt, play him at first, and then move Aubrey Huff to third base until Pablo Sandoval is healthy again. That's a drastic move defensively, since Huff hasn't played third in a few years and wasn't good there to begin with. It's just how desperate they're getting for more punch. (Mercurynews.com)

MORE JOHNSON, LESS BRIGNAC: Rays manager Joe Maddon said that Elliot Johnson is likely to see the majority of the playing time moving forward at shortstop while Reid Brignac will play less. Considering Johnson is a switch-hitter and Brignac swings lefty (with the majority of opposing starters being right-handed), it won't be a straight platoon in the least. "I don't want to be committed to that. You're going to see more of Elliot. Let's put it that way," Maddon said. "I think he's done a nice job." (TampaBay.com) Johnson is 3-7 with two home runs and a stolen base in his past two starts. Brignac is hitting just .179 with a dreadful .402 OPS this season.

GUT FEELING: The Mariners are about to receive a shot in the arm -- both offensively and defensively -- Wednesday, as Gold Glove center fielder Franklin Gutierrez will finally be activated from the disabled list. He'd been sidelined since the middle of spring training with a stomach ailment that had bothered him a good portion of 2010 as well. Expect Gutierrez to immediately take over in center for Mike Saunders, who has been fine in center but brutal offensively (.171/.222/.265). Gutierrez is superb in the outfield and a capable hitter. He hit .245 with 12 home runs and 64 RBI last season, but remember, he was plagued by the stomach issue. In 2009, he hit .283 with 18 homers, 70 RBI and a .764 OPS. (MLB.com)

REMEMBER ME? Dallas McPherson was once a top-20 prospect in all of baseball. He was the Brandon Wood of the early-to-mid 2000s -- expected to be a big power source for the Angels, only to flop several times before the Angels finally gave up on him. The difference was McPherson could blame some of his woes on injuries and he wasn't near as bad, sporting a .755 OPS in 117 games for the Angels in parts of three seasons. Still he hadn't been in the majors since 2008 ... until Tuesday night. McPherson is now a member of the White Sox and got a hit in his big-league at-bat in three seasons. It has been a long road back through a back surgery and lingering problems. "I've got to be honest, I wasn't sure I'd hear those words again," he said in discussing his promotion back to the majors. (Chicago Sun-Times)

FLASHBACK CAPS FOR SALE: The Angels are going to wear four different throwback jerseys this season on Friday home games, in what they're calling "Flashback Fridays." Well, the lids will be available for sale, which is sweet. I'd love to get the one with the lower-case "a" with a halo over it. Awesome. (The Ballcap Blog)

HIGH PRAISE: It's become pretty common knowledge at this point that Brandon Phillips is the best defensive second baseman in baseball, but that doesn't mean it hurts for him to hear the words from a former Reds second baseman -- one who is in the Hall of Fame. "He's unbelievable to me, with his range and everything," said Joe Morgan. "I think he's the best defensive second baseman in the game. He's athletic and he's willing to take chances, which I think is what separates him." (Cincinnati.com)

DREAM COME TRUE: Tony Campana grew up in the Cincinnati area and was able to make his major-league debut Tuesday night in Cincinnati -- only it was for the Cubs. He didn't disappoint his reported 50-plus friends and family in attendance, either, as Campana picked up an RBI double in his first big-league at-bat. He scored the go-ahead run an inning earlier when he had entered as a pinch-runner. "It's pretty much a dream come true, other than the outcome of the game," Campana said. "I couldn't be happier to come out, get a hit, score a run and get an RBI." Oh, yeah, that outcome. The Cubs blew the game again. This time in the eighth. (MLB.com)

RAIN DELAY FUN: All kinds of stuff happens when baseball players are waiting out rain delays. Here's a great video of some jousting with bats, courtesy of college teams Radford and High Point.

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