Tag:Kevin Gregg
Posted on: December 10, 2010 12:28 pm
 

Orioles offer Gregg 2 years, $8-10M

Even though the Orioles have Koji Uehara back in the fold, they're pursuing free agent Kevin Gregg as a possible closer.

The Baltimore Sun reports that the Orioles have made Gregg a two-year offer worth between $8 million and $10 million. The 32-year-old, who saved 37 games for the Blue Jays last season, also has interest from the Pirates, Mariners, Nationals and Red Sox, according to a report this week from FOXSports.com.

Given Gregg's variety of options, he probably won't go anywhere he's not promised the closer's job. As it stands now Uehara would be Baltimore's closer, but team president Andy McPhail told the Sun the closer's role is up to manager Buck Showalter.

-- David Andriesen

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Posted on: December 7, 2010 5:06 pm
Edited on: December 7, 2010 5:45 pm
 

Gregg has multi-year offer in hand

Gregg There has been heavy interest in reliever Kevin Gregg to the point where multiple years have been bandied about for his services.

Toronto isn't one of those teams, as they held two club options on Gregg that were declined, making him a free agent. Gregg is coming off a solid season serving as the Jays' closer by notching 37 saves along with a 3.51 ERA in 59 innings.

The Red Sox, Pirates and Nationals have made offers, while the Orioles and Mariners are also inquiring on the righty, as FOX Sports ' Ken Rosenthal reports.

Offering a multi-year deal to Gregg, who is a volatile reliever due to struggles with command, is not Boston's M.O. so its unlikely the multi-year offer(s) come from Boston. It can't be ruled out from the Pirates and Nationals. If Gregg would prefer to close, his best shot is with Pittsburgh as the Nats have Drew Storen as closer-in-waiting.

UPDATE : The Orioles are the team to offer two years, which may be enough to get Gregg, as the Baltimore Sun 's Dan Connolly reports. Baltimore doesn't have any incumbent closer, so Gregg would likely serve in that role. The club is also nearing an agreement to bring Koji Uehara back.

-- Evan Brunell

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Posted on: November 30, 2010 11:55 pm
 

Francisco, Frasor accept arbitration

Jason Frasor The Rangers' Frank Francisco and the Blue Jays' Jason Frasor have accepted salary arbitration, the Major League Baseball Players Association announced Tuesday night. They were the only two of 27 arbitration-eligible free agents to accept.

Francisco and Frasor are both middle relievers and may have found themselves hamstrung by being Type A free agents and costing a draft pick to sign.

Turning down arbitration were Kevin Gregg, Octavio Dotel, Trevor Hoffman, Kevin Correia, Pedro Feliciano, Aaron Heilman, Brad Hawpe, Felipe Lopez, Scott Downs, Randy Choate, Grant Balfour, J.J. Putz, Carl Crawford, Rafael Soriano, Carl Pavano, Adrian Beltre, Chad Qualls, Cliff Lee, Jayson Werth, Adam Dunn, Jesse Crain, Orlando Hudson, Paul Konerko, Miguel Olivo and Adam LaRoche.

Those 25 players could still re-sign with their previous teams.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

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Posted on: November 4, 2010 11:07 pm
 

Jays decline option on Gregg

The Blue Jays had some of the most desirable bullpen arms on the trade market, instead, they held on to them. Now they have none.

Toronto declined its option on closer Kevin Gregg. Its setup men, Scott Downs and Jason Frasor, are eligible for free agency. The team is expected to offer both the lefty Downs and righty Frasor arbitration, as both are Type A free agents. As a Type A, the Blue Jays would receive two compensatory draft picks each if the players turn down arbitration and sign elsewhere.

Gregg is a Type B free agent (one compensatory pick). The Blue Jays had a one-year option worth $5.25 million and a two-year option worth $9.5 million for the next two seasons. His buyout was worth $750,000.

Gregg had a 3.51 ERA and 37 saves last season, his first in Toronto.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 4, 2010 10:14 pm
Edited on: November 8, 2010 9:12 am
 

Jays acquire Olivo, decline option

Miguel Olivo The Rockies have traded catcher Miguel Olivo to the Blue Jays for a player to be named, the Denver Post 's Troy Renck reports (via Twitter ).

The Rockies had a $2.5 million option and expexted to decline it if they didn't work out a trade. Olivo hit .269/.315/.449 with 14 home runs in 2010. Olivo had a hot start, hitting .325/.377/.548 with 11 home runs before the All-Star break and .193/.225/.313 after the break.

The move saves Colorado the $500,000 buyout of his option.

UPDATE: As MLB.com's Jordan Bastain points out (via Twitter ), the Jays have until midnight to pick up Olivo's option, and that's not a given.

UPDATE: Bastain was all over it. As he reports (on Twitter ), the Jays declined the option on Olivo. Olivo is a Type B free agent, so the Blue Jays may have picked up seven picks for the 2011 draft with two Type A (Jason Frasor, Scott Downs) and three Type B (Kevin Gregg, John Buck, Olivo) free agents.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

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Posted on: October 7, 2010 1:04 am
Edited on: October 7, 2010 6:50 pm
 

R.I.P. Blue Jays: Homer barrage falls short

RIP As the sports world waits for the crowning of a champion, 22 other teams are busy preparing for spring training. What went wrong for these teams, and what does 2011 hold? MLB Facts and Rumors here at CBS Sports will be answering those questions through all of October. Now batting: the Blue Jays.

An 85-win season, just four games behind third place in the tough AL East wasn't supposed to happen after trading one of the game's best pitchers.

But it did. Roy Halladay went south to Philadelphia, tossed a perfect game and no-hitter, and the Jays ended up with a stable of prospects, none of which made an impact at the major-league level until the final weeks of the season.

And yet, the Jays made noise all season -- thunderous noise. The team bashed a franchise-high 257 home runs, third all-time behind the 1997 Mariners and 2000 Rangers. It wasn't enough for a playoff season, but you can't call the year a disappointment either.

WHAT WENT WRONG

There were two things that held the Jays back from an improbable postseason berth: an inability to draw a walk and starting pitching.

The Jays hacked at the ball all season long. Sure, it paid off with 257 home runs, but many of these solo shots could have been turned into multiple RBIs, or even if you sacrifice some power to get on base, in the long run more runs likely would have been scored. On offense, the two most disappointing performances came from two of the best hitters from the 2009 squad: Aaron Hill and Adam Lind. Hill suffered from an extremely unlucky batting average on balls in play which dragged his average down to .205, but maintained his power by bashing 26 dingers. Lind, 26, tumbled from 35 home runs to 23 and a .305 batting average to .237. If both had performed up to par, the Jays very well could have finished third.

Jose Bautista While the Jays boast a young, exciting starting rotation, there were growing pains. Brandon Morrow shook off a slow start to the season and eventually threw a no-hitter but still ended with a 4.49 ERA. Marc Rzepczynski posted a 4.95 ERA in 12 starts, while Brian Tallet, Jesse Litsch, Brad Mills and Dana Eveland all posted a total of 26 starts of an ERA around 6.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

An awful lot went right -- how about a career season from Jose Bautista for starters? Bautista (pictured right) jacked an amazing 54 home runs after a previous high of 16 (set way back in 2006) thanks to a slight change in offensive philosophy.

John Buck had a career year of his own, posting a .802 OPS while catching and is in line for a lucrative deal in free agency. Vernon Wells enjoyed a bounce-back year, ending at .272/.331/.515. The bad news: there is still $86 million and four years to go on his onerous contract.

Ricky Romero and Brett Cecil (pictured, below right) paired with Morrow to give the Jays a fantastic top three of starters 25 or under, while Shaun Marcum returned from a one-year layoff to post a 3.64 ERA. The rotation, especially if Kyle Drabek flourishes in the No. 5 spot, will give teams nightmares in 2011.

HELP ON THE WAY

Drabek was part of the package acquired for Halladay and made three late-season starts, hurling 17 total innings while whiffing 12 and walking 5 for a 4.76 ERA. The 22-year-old is considered a future mid-rotation starter if not more, and will battle for the No. 5 spot next season among a host of candidates.

Brett Cecil One such candidate is Zach Stewart, Toronto's preseason top prospect according to Baseball America . Acquired in the Scott Rolen trade in 2009, Stewart made 26 starts at the Triple-A level and impressed. Even if Drabek beats him out, Stewart is likely a top candidate to make his major-league debut at some point. Brad Mills, who collected a few starts in 2010, will serve as rotation depth while Josh Roenicke could be a major weapon out of the bullpen if he can firm up his command.

Catcher J.P. Arencibia was the No. 2 prospect for Baseball America and had a debut to remember. He went 4-for-5 with two home runs on August 7, but didn't do much down the stretch. He showed enough down on the farm that he will likely start the majority of the games in 2011.
 
EXPECTATIONS FOR 2011

The Jays certainly have a right to set a goal of finishing third, and could push for the wild card. Most of the offense is returning, and while regression to the mean has to be factored in for Bautista, bounce-back seasons from Aaron Hill and Adam Lind should make up the deficit. The starting pitching will be one year older and experienced.

What may bite Toronto in 2011, unless moves are made to address the situation, is the bullpen. The Jays will likely pick up closer Kevin Gregg's options, but there's no guarantee Gregg repeats his most successful season as a closer. Top relievers Scott Downs and Jason Frasor are slated to hit the market and will likely not return, and the Jays are unlikely to shell out big bucks for replacements, instead choosing to go with internal replacements or low-cost alternatives.

SUGGESTIONS FOR 2011

While the Jays have quite a few arbitration candidates to go before an actual budget can be predicted, they're likely to have at least $10 million, if not more, to spend in the free agent market that would get them to the 2010 payroll of $79 million. The priorities on offense are to find a first baseman as well as another bat that can play either second, third or right. With both Aaron Hill and Jose Bautista able to move to third, GM Alex Anthopoulous has flexibility when it comes to positions to chase.

Anthopoulous should focus on those who can take a pitch, with home run power secondary. First base/DH candidates who could fit in Toronto's budget (with Lind occupying the other position) include Jim Thome and Russell Branyan. Other candidates to play second, third or right are Bill Hall, Orlando Hudson, Juan Uribe and perhaps even Magglio Ordonez.

2011 PREDICTION

With Tampa Bay slashing payroll, the opportunity is there for Toronto to make a play for third -- and they'll try to do just that, but figure to fall just short, just like 2010. Poor Toronto -- if they weren't in the AL East, it'd be a near-lock to make the postseason.

Check out the rest of the R.I.P. teams here.

-- Evan Brunell

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Posted on: August 27, 2010 9:17 pm
 

Jays relievers claimed

In an unsurprising move, the Blue Jays put nearly their entire bullpen through waivers -- and none made it out unclaimed.

The Toronto Sun's Bob Elliott reports (on Twitter ) Jason Frasor, Scott Downs, Kevin Gregg and Shawn Camp were all claimed.

Who claimed them? Oh, probably just about every team in contention -- and maybe a few that aren't. Bullpen help this time of year is always needed, so it would have been more surprising had any of the relievers cleared waivers.

Now, will the Jays trade any of them? That seems like a more interesting question. Don't expect more than one of those to switch uniforms anytime soon.
-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .


Posted on: August 1, 2010 10:28 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 12:28 pm
 

Trade market still open


Adam Dunn Everyone refers to the last day of July as the "trade deadline" even if it's not exactly accurate. It's officially the "non-waiver trade deadline" and that first part may not roll off the tongue, but it's important. It's the reason why one of the most speculated-about players at the deadline, Adam Dunn, told me July 31 "doesn't mean [anything]" to him.

Dunn should know, in the last year of a two-year deal, Dunn's movement will be speculated upon throughout the next month. He also knows from experience, two years ago the Reds traded him to Arizona after the non-waiver trade deadline.

Waivers are certainly a complication, but deals still get done until the end of the month, when a player has to be on the roster to be eligible for the postseason. So how does it work?

First, most teams put most -- if not all -- their players through the waiver process since you don't have to give up a player who is claimed, you can just pull him off waivers.

Unclaimed players can be traded to any team. Claimed players can be kept, traded or just handed over to the claiming team for nothing but salary relief. That's what happened last year when the Blue Jays put him on waivers, the White Sox claimed him and Toronto was happy to shed his remaining five years for $59.7 million on his contract. So, if some team wanted to claim Carlos Zambrano or Kosuke Fukudome or Alfonso Soriano, the Cubs would likely dance for joy. But that's unlikely to happen (even though I would have said the same thing a year ago about Rios).

Now, if just one team claims a player, he can be dealt only to that team. If more than one team claims a player, he can be traded to the team with the worst record in his league that claims him. If no team in the same league claims the player, but more than one team in the other league claims him, he can be traded to the team with the worst record.

So now with the process out of the way, it's good to keep in mind that this isn't an unusual process. Last season Scott Kazmir, Jim Thome, Carl Pavano, Alex Gonzalez, Brad Penny, Aubrey Huff, Billy Wagner, Jon Garland and Ivan Rodriguez. So who could that be this year?

Obviously, Dunn is still out there. He realizes the real trade deadline is at the end of this month, not the beginning. If the Nationals can't agree to an extension, the Nationals need to get something for Dunn. Based on many of the rumors that were out there, it was hardly surprising he wasn't dealt. Nationals GM Mike Rizzo was asking for the moon and nobody was willing to spend the money to get there. White Sox GM Kenny Williams hasn't exactly hidden his desire for Dunn, and a little thing like waivers won't stop him. However, he'll have to hope nearly the rest of the teams pass on the big man, and that's not likely.

The biggest name that could move would be Manny Ramirez. The Dodgers don't know what they're going to get out of him and could shed roughly $7 million. As CBSSports.com senior writer Scott Miller notes , Ramirez has a full no-trade clause, but would likely waive that to go to the American League and DH. If the White Sox can't get Dunn, Ramirez may be a solid backup option -- albeit a bit expensive.

Andy LaRoche Diamondbacks first baseman Adam LaRoche has a mutual option for 2011 that increases to $9.5 million if he's traded, though the buyout remains at $1.5 million. Kelly Johnson may not get through waivers, but could still be traded. He's arbitration eligible after the season.

The Royals would certainly love for another team to take Jose Guillen and what's left of the $12 million salary for this season. Guillen is a free agent after the season.

Mike Lowell is still -- sorta -- with the Red Sox, but would likely sail through waivers because he's owed the remainder of his $12 million salary this season and nobody's quite sure what they'll get out of him.

The reliever market didn't see much action on Saturday, but Toronto's Kevin Gregg, Seattle's David Aardsma and Colorado's Joe Beimel could be moved before the end of this month.

As for starters, Colorado's Aaron Cook is signed for $9.25 million next season with a mutual option of $11 million in 2012 and a $0.5 million buyout. His annual salary increases by $1 million for each season.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com