Tag:Logan Morrison
Posted on: August 14, 2011 12:10 am
Edited on: August 14, 2011 12:27 am
 

Marlins demote Morrison, release Helms

Logan MorrisonBy C. Trent Rosecrans

The Marlins released veteran Wes Helms and demoted 23-year-old Logan Morrison following Saturday's 3-0 loss to the Giants.

While Helms release isn't too surprising considering the 35-year-old is hitting .193/.279/.239 in 68 games, Morrison's ticket to Triple-A New Orleans was more surprising. Morrison is hitting .249/.327/.464 with 17 homers and 60 RBI. While manager Jack McKeon told reporters Morrison needs to "work on his whole game," Morrison told Harvey Fialkov of the Sun-Sentinel that he believed he was demoted because of something "off the field."

Marrison is one of the game's most entertaining players off the field and on Twitter and in other media. 

"I think it's something else but I don't know if I want to say it right now," Morrison told Joe Capozzi of the Palm Beach Post.

Morrison said he was "heartbroken."

"Right now I just feel resentment and anger," Morrison told Capozzi. "Stand up for what's right and this happens."

Morrison wouldn;t elaborate on what he stood up for that got him demoted. He said he asked for an explanation from the Marlins brass and his batting average was cited.

Morrison had not tweeted since being released (as of midnight), even though Morrison didn't think Twitter was the issue.

Capozzi cited a team source as saying the organization is trying to send a message, "To me it's a lesson, concentrate on the game and stop trying to be so funny."

Morrison said he felt both moves were related to "the same incident." 

Helms said he didn't know what the issue with Morrison was, but as for himself, he doesn't want to retire.

"I'm hitting .190 and haven't played much lately," Helms told the Sun-Sentinel. "They got to do what they got to do. They got a new stadium next year and evidently I'm not part of the plan. I'm not done yet. I want to give it a shot somewhere else. Not ready to coach yet."

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Posted on: August 11, 2011 1:51 pm
 

Morrison gets into brief spat with Marlins writer

RamirezBy Evan Brunell

The Marlins' Logan Morrison and South Florida Sun-Sentinel reporter Juan C. Rodriguez had a bit of a spat Wednesday night, when Rodriguez wrote that Morrison had taken "jabs" at teammate and star shortstop Hanley Ramirez.

Morrison told Rodriguez the Marlins lack "experience and a veteran who is in the lineup every day that can be an anchor for us" in the lineup. The club has been struggling offensively, and Ramirez hitting the disabled list with a sprained left shoulder after sitting out eight straight games certainly didn't help matters.

When asked if Ramirez could be that person, Morrison added, “I guess, but he’s not there every game. It’s 162 games. It’s not a 100-game season.”

That was enough for Rodriguez to title his story "Florida Marlins OF Logan Morrison takes more jabs at DLed Hanley Ramirez," and that upset Morrison greatly, who took to Twitter to voice his complaints.

"[F]unny how u left the part out about how unfortunate it is that he was hurt and that he could be an anchor if he was healthy," he tweeted to Rodriguez, adding another note that the story "probably wouldn't have been that good of a story then! Might want to think twice about coming around my locker next time."

Let's stop for a second and appreciate how much Twitter has changed the baseball world. In the past, the only conduit to fans for players on a large scale was through the media. Now, players are not only able to go straight to the fans with Twitter, but they can take a stand for themselves if they feel they are being improperly treated. In the olden days, Morrison would have only been able to tell Rodriguez the next day not to come to his locker anymore, and the story would have swelled. Instead, Morrison fired off some tweets after reading the story and was able to defend himself to the public. Rodriguez then altered the story, telling Twitter followers that the issue had been "straightened out."

The new story added two sentences:

Morrison later clarified his comments, saying they weren’t intended as a dig at Ramirez. What he meant to convey was that the offense’s struggles sans Ramirez shows how important he is to this team.
Disaster averted, thanks to the magic that is Twitter. Any time you can make a process more public, open and transparent, that's a good thing. A chief complaint players have when they deal with the media is that the media selectively uses quotes to craft the story, painting things in a certain light that may otherwise have been unintended. In the olden days, reporters had space considerations in the newspapers, so would lop off any quotes that were extraneous or unimportant. These days, it's less of an issue given the internet has no space limitations, but as we saw, that doesn't erase the issue entirely. With the advent of social networking, though, it allows for one more check and balance.

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Posted on: August 8, 2011 12:49 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Reddick, Red Sox walk-off winners

Josh Reddick

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Josh Reddick, Red Sox: In his first four at-bats of Sunday's game against the Yankees, Reddick went hitless and left six men on base. But he came up big in the 10th inning, singling in the game-winning run, for the first walk-off hit of his career. With the win, Boston moved back into sole possession of first place in the American League East, a game ahead of the Yankees. Reddick got his shot because Carl Crawford had three hits in his first four at-bats of the game, so after David Ortiz doubled with one out in the 10th off of Phil Hughes, the Yankees elected to intentionally walk Crawford and take their chances against Reddick. Reddick swung at Hughes' first offering, lining it the other way and just inside the left-field line, easily scoring pinch-runner Darnell McDonald from second.

Jake Peavy, White Sox: Peavy picked up his first victory since June 25 -- and his first win in a start since June 22 -- with eight shutout innings against the Twins. Peavy scattered three hits and struck out six batters without a walk to improve to 5-5 on the season. The White Sox picked up their first sweep of the Twins in Minnesota in more than seven years.

Johnny Giavotella, Royals: In just his third game in the big leagues, Ned Yost put the rookie second baseman in the No. 3 spot in the lineup. The result? A double and a solo homer. In three games this season, he's 5 for 11 and slugging .909. Giavotella started a rally in the fourth inning, leading the inning off with a double, moving to third on a wild pitch and scoring on Billy Butler's groundout. The Royals scored two more runs in the inning and his homer off of starter Max Scherzer in the next inning gave Kansas City a 4-0 victory, a lead they'd hold on to for a 4-3 victory over the Tigers.


Kevin Correia, Pirates: Correia wasn't awful -- but he needed to be better than that to put the stops to the Pirates' losing streak. He lasted 5 2/3 innings, allowing five hits and four runs on four walks and three strikeouts. Correia has 10 wins away from PNC Park, but is 2-7 with a 7.71 ERA at home, as the Pirates lost 7-3 to the Padres to drop their 10th in a row. With the loss and Milwaukee's win, the Pirates fell to 10 games out of first place in the National League Central and into fourth place, a half-game behind the Reds. Pittsburgh is now five games under .500 on the season at 54-59.

Rockies resting on the sabbath: Colorado lost its 16th consecutive Sunday game, falling 3-2 to the Nationals at Coors Field. The Rockies won their first two Sunday games of the season and haven't won since. Colorado came back to tie the game in the seventh, but Jayson Werth's RBI single in the eighth gave the Nationals the lead and ultimately the victory.

Marlins defense: Logan Morrison and shortstop Emilio Bonifacio ran into each other trying to catch Corey Patterson's sixth-inning popup, allowing Patterson to reach second. After getting two outs, the Marlins intentionally walked Albert Pujols and Matt Holliday singled to right, where Mike Stanton let the ball bounce off his glove. Patterson would have scored anyway, but it allowed Pujols to go to third and Holliday to advance to third (not to mention tie the game). After an intentional walk to Lance Berkman, Jon Jay singled in two runs on a blooper. After Florida tied the game in the bottom of the inning, Bonifacio's throwing error on a Patterson grounder led to three unearned runs in the seventh and a 8-4 Cardinals victory.

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Posted on: August 5, 2011 2:00 pm
 

Did La Russa's inaction send the wrong message?

Tony La RussaBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Now don't get me wrong, Albert Pujols is the best player in baseball, the biggest cog in the Cardinals' machine and the best thing to happen to Tony La Russa since Jose Canseco discovered syringes -- but did La Russa's actions -- and non-actions -- this week send the wrong signal to Cardinal players not named Albert?

You may remember there was a little brouhaha earlier this week after Pujols was hit in the hand (admittedly unintentionally by everyone from Pujols to La Russa) by Brewers reliever Takashi Saito. La Russa went nuts, called Brewers fans "idiots," and had his pitcher, Jason Motte throw at the Brewres' Ryan Braun. Not only did Motte (who laughably denied intent afterward) throw inside and miss Braun with his first pitch, he then drilled him in the back with his second pitch.

"I don't want to even hear about Braun getting a little pop in the back when we almost lose [Pujols] in several ways," La Russa said after the game with the Brewers.

So fast forward to Thursday night: bases loaded, one out and Marlins right-hander Clay Hensley on the mound with David Freese at the plate. Hensley, who had struggled with control all night (and had already hit Matt Holliday up and in on the hand) hits Freese not in the hand, but in the head.

It was frightening and sickening. You never want to see a player hit in the head. It's an awful sight nobody wants to see -- least of all the man responsible, Hensley. But wasn't the principle the same? You don't throw at one of Tony's guys inside or high? Does the judge and jury in sunglasses need to make his verdict and dole out retribution? That's the message that was loud and clear on Tuesday.

Or was it?

The first pitch to the next Marlins batter after Freese went down? An 81 mph changeup low and slightly in from Kyle Lohse to Logan Morrison. No retaliation, no "stinger," no nothing. The second pitch? A sinker called for a strike. Morrison then singled on Lohse's fourth pitch, another changeup.

Is the lesson learned hear that a shot to the head is less dangerous to one at the hand? Or is it that Pujols is more valuable not just on the field but as a person than a 28-year-old with 144 big-league games under his belt? Hit Albert and your team will pay. Hit one of the other guys? It's OK, just don't hit Albert. If I'm one of the other guys, I first worry about my fallen teammate and then wonder if I'm important enough for my manager to care about.

But hey, La Russa sure sent a message against the Brewers -- Saito won't ever hit another guy because Motte twice threw at Braun. So since La Russa didn't go all outlaw justice on the Marlins, Hensley doesn't have any idea that it's bad to hit a player in the head, right? He needs La Russa's guidance to understand hitting someone in the head with a baseball is a bad idea.

Maybe not.

"It's unacceptable," Hensley told reporters after the game (via the St. Louis Post-Dispatch). "I could have seriously hurt somebody. You never want to go out there and hit people, much less hit them in the head."

Maybe, just maybe, having your pitcher hit another player doesn't teach a lesson -- they can figure it out on their own without help from the other team's manager. Could it be that teaching a lesson via a "stinger" only escalates the problem? Nope, that's not La Russa's code -- and he's apparently the keeper of the code, so only he can decide that. 

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Posted on: August 3, 2011 9:48 am
 

Pepper: Cardinals-Brewers rivalry heats up



By Matt Snyder


Last year it was the Cardinals against the Reds in the NL Central. This time around, it's the Brewers who seem to have drawn the ire of the Cardinals. Tuesday night, the Cardinals beat the Brewers to move within 2 1/2 games in the NL Central and break the Brewers' long winning streak, but everyone was talking about a pair of hit-by-pitches after the game.

In the top of the seventh inning, Brewers reliever Takashi Saito hit Albert Pujols in the hand/wrist area. It loaded the bases and was pretty clearly not intentional. Cardinals manager Tony La Russa even said as much post-game, though he also noted he still had an issue with it (via Associated Press).

"Real scary. They almost got him yesterday. There's nothing intentional about it," La Russa said. "That's what all these idiots up there -- not idiots, fans are yelling and yell. Do you know how many bones you have in the hands and the face? That's where those pitches are."

Next half-inning, La Russa left in Jason Motte to face Ryan Braun. Motte missed Braun on his first pitch, but not on his second try. He was removed after the hit-by-pitch and is the Cardinals hardest throwing reliever. Of course, La Russa says they weren't trying to hit Braun.

"And Braun, we were trying to pitch him in, too, it's just a little stinger," La Russa said (AP). "I don't want to even hear about Braun getting a little pop in the back when we almost lose [Pujols] in several ways."

Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina -- who was ejected and may have spat on the umpire -- backed up La Russa's story. Brewers catcher Jonathan Lucroy had a different spin.

"That's clearly intentional. I mean that's ridiculous," Lucroy said (AP). "There's no way that we were trying to hit Pujols on purpose. You kidding me in that situation? If we wanted to put him on base, we would have walked him. That's ridiculous. We were trying to pitch inside and get a ground ball to third base."

For whatever it's worth, Pujols had no issues with his getting hit, saying "it's part of the game." (AP)

It's hard to not take sides here, because I don't think anyone other than Cardinals fans -- and even some of those would be excluded -- believes La Russa. It appears pretty obvious Motte was left out there to hit Braun and was going to have four chances to do it, not just the two it took. From here, each individual can make the call as to whether or not it was warranted.

Ryno moves on: After being named the Triple-A manager of the year, Ryne Sandberg was reportedly not even in the Cubs "top three or four" choices to manage the 2011 season in the bigs, but he doesn't hold a grudge. Sandberg told the Chicago Sun Times that he's moved on and looks forward, not backward. He says he still plans on making it to the majors one way or another. He's currently managing the Phillies' Triple-A affiliate.

LoMo visits Fan Cave with a 'friend:' Last week, Marlins outfielder Logan Morrison had a highly publicized run-in with a praying mantis in the Marlins dugout, and he later admitted via Twitter that he's afraid of bugs. Tuesday, he showed he was a good sport by visiting the MLB Fan Cave with someone dressed as a praying mantis. (MLB.com)

Hard-luck losers: Beyond the Box Score took a look at the pitchers with the most losses in MLB history that came while they still threw at least seven innings while allowing three earned runs or less. It might be easier to simply disregard the archaic wins and losses stat, but since it's still mainstream, I'm on board with things like this. You'll find Nolan Ryan, Bert Blyleven and Greg Maddux on the list, among other all-time greats.

Legend of Sam Fuld: Sam Fuld has been a bit of a cult hero in Tampa Bay since being traded from the Cubs this past offseason, so it was only a matter of time before a promotional poster was made. I have to say, it's pretty hilarious. A spin-off of Legends of the Fall, the Legends of the Fuld poster features Fuld, Chuck Norris and the Dos Equis guy. (TampaBay.com)

Use the Force: The Marlins won on two ninth-inning runs Tuesday night -- which came courtesy of a Justin Turner throwing error. Marlins catcher John Buck reportedly distracted the Mets' second baseman, and Buck credits his first-base coach for employing a "Jedi mind trick." Luke Skywalker would be proud. (Fish Tank)

Cody's the answer again: The 2010 Giants postseason hero was Cody Ross, a very late addition last August via the second trade deadline (using waivers). This season, the Giants were reportedly seeking a center fielder who could lead off, but Ross might again be the answer. He filled both roles Monday and Tuesday. (SFGate.com)

MVPs together again: Joey Votto and Josh Hamilton won the MVPs from their respective leagues in 2010, and they're commemorated together on a bobblehead, as Louisville Bats -- where the two were once teammates (OMGReds).

Sad road of Irabu: Robert Whiting of Slate chronicles the career of recently-deceased Hideki Irabu in an excellently written story.

Frankrupt: The dissatisfaction with Dodgers owner -- at least for now -- Frank McCourt has spawned many different money-making ventures by disgruntled fans, including T-shirts that say "Frankrupt" and a website that begs Mark Cuban to "save the Dodgers." (LA Times)

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Posted on: July 27, 2011 10:53 am
 

When Insects Attack: MLB Edition

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Maybe the folks at CBS headquarters in New York need new show ideas -- so I give them, When Insects Attack: MLB Edition:



Afterward, Logan Morrison tweeted about the attack

Logan Morrison

The bug found a friendlier companion in pitcher Clay Hensley, Joe Frisaro of MLB.com tweeted.

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Posted on: July 22, 2011 12:19 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Wilson loses despite stellar game

Walden

By Evan Brunell


C.J. Wilson, Rangers: Wilson made history on Thursday, and not the good kind. He's in 3 Up because of the excellent performance he put forth: Wilson pitched an eight-inning complete game but lost due to an unearned run scoring thanks to an error. He limited the Angels to just two hits, one walk and eight strikeouts. Normally, that's enough to pull out a win with ease. But Wilson was going up against Jered Weaver, who blanked the Rangers through seven to drop his ERA to 1.81. Wilson is the first pitcher to lose a two-hit complete game with no earned runs since the Yankees' Kenny Rogers on May 28, 1996, as ESPN Stats and Info tweets. That's not all. On the MLB Network scrolling newsbar, it was noted that the last time Texas lost while limiting the opposition to two hits or fewer was August 15, 1989. So yeah, he made some bad history, but twirled quite a game.

Jordan Walden, Angels: Walden lands here not just because of what he did Thursday, but what he also did on Wednesday. The Angels dropped the first game of the series to Texas, running the Rangers' winning streak to 12. But Los Angeles eked out one-run wins each of the next two nights, and it was Walden who closed out both games with 100-mph heat. That's some sizzle coming from the rookie, who now has 23 saves on the season, striking out 43 in 41 innings. Other players (such as Jeremy Hellickson) will get more attention in Rookie of the Year voting, but don't forget about Walden.

Jhonny Peralta, Tigers: Peralta went boom in a very big way, launching a home run into the second deck of left field in the 8th inning to emphatically defeat the Twins 6-2 -- but not before Detroit's new third baseman in Wilson Betemit made a comical throw in the ninth that allowed a run to come in. Peralta had three hits and three RBI and is up to .317/.364/.533, numbers he hasn't seen since 2005, his first full season in the bigs.



Logan Morrison, Marlins: LoMo is struggling lately, with his latest 0-for-4 dropping his batting average to .147 since the All-Star break. But that's symptomatic of a larger trend, as Morrison is slashing .212/.274/.394 since the beginning of June, which does not include his Thursday ofer. Somehow, he's collected 30 RBI so is still doing OK in that department, but the power hitter is really struggling right now. He saw a potential two-run home run stolen away by Cameron Maybin in the first inning. Morrison later wrote something on a baseball and tossed it to Maybin, tweeting after that he had written "'U can take my HR but u cannot take my freedom' #Braveheart." It's nice to see Morrison still has his humor.

Jhoulys Chacin, Rockies: Chacin walked a career high seven batters in this outing and it's the third time he's walked at least six in the last six outings. That does sound pretty bad, but in his defense, had issued just one free pass in each of his two most recent outings before this stinker against the Braves in which he gave up five runs in 4 2/3 innings. Chacin is on pace to throw 208 2/3 innings on the year. This from a 23-year-old topped out at 137 1/3 innings last season in his first full year of the majors. Colorado may want to scale back.

Brandon Allen, Diamondbacks: Allen has a chance here to grab onto the starting job at first base and not let go. Arizona cleared the team of Russell Branyan quite some time ago and now has optioned Juan Miranda to Triple-A. Allen was given the call over Paul Goldschmidt, so he has some competition in the minors waiting for him. He got off to a good start yesterday by slugging a home run but today contributed an all too common 0-for-3 night with two strikeouts. Allen's power is awesome, but his issue in past big-league stints has been his strikeouts dragging him down. The D-Backs, after losing shortstop Stephen Drew for the season, may not have a ton of patience, as they need to keep contending.

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Posted on: July 8, 2011 10:15 am
Edited on: July 8, 2011 1:09 pm
 

Pepper: @DatDudeBP leads MLB tweeters

By C. Trent Rosecrans



BASEBALL TODAY:
CBSSports.com senior writer Danny Knobler joins Lauren Shehadi to talk about Derek Jeter, but also notes these games against the Yankees are not just big for Jeter's chase of 3,000 but also vital for the Rays. There's also the Braves-Phillies series, but Danny points out why that may not be as big of a series.

TWITTER 140: Our own @JamesonFleming put together the sports world's top 140 Twitter users and the Cincinnati Reds' Brandon Phillips (@DatDudeBP) comes in as baseball's best Twitter user.

Phillips didn't start using Twitter until this offseason, but has embraced the technology, holding contests for fans and also taking suggestions on restaurants and off-day activities. Earlier this season, a teen asked Phillips to come to his baseball game on a day the Reds were off, and Phillips stopped by. He also sent a pair fans to spring training and then another pair to San Francisco for the Reds' games at AT&T Park.

He has even won over some Cardinals fans, an amazing feat considering Cardinal nation's distaste for the Reds second baseman, who last year used not-so-nice words to describe Tony La Russa's club.

Florida's Logan Morrison (@LoMoMarlins) is fourth on the list and the second baseball player. Brewers closer John Axford (@JohnAxford) is the third MLB player in the Top 10.

LAST ONE THE TOUGHEST: George Brett told the Associated Press he thought the last hit would be the toughest for Derek Jeter in his quest for 3,000. Of course, Brett reached the mark with a four-hit game. Brett also said he wasn't sure how many more players would reach the milestone.

"Is that desire still going to be there when they're worth $250 million when they're 37 years old?" Brett said.

GOTTA BE THE SHOES: Jeter will be wearing special shoes for his 3,000th hit, and you can get a matching pair. Yahoo!'s Big League Stew has all the details on the details of the shoes.

JETER'S BALLS: One more Jeter entry -- a look at the special baseballs that MLB will use to try to track Jeter's 3,000th hit. [BizofBaseball.com]

CARDS LOCK UP GARCIA?: There are reports from the radio station partially owned by the Cardinals that say the team has reached a four-year deal with two option years with left-hander Jaime Garcia. The deal would cover all three arbitration years and one year of free agency for the 25-year-old Garcia. He's 8-3 this season with a 3.23 ERA and is 22-12 with a  3.07 ERA in his career. [MLB.com]

HARPER STILL TOPS: Baseball America released its Midseason Top 50 Prospects List, and the Nationals' Bryce Harper leads the list, followed by Angels outfielder Mike Trout and Rays' lefty Matt Moore.

ALL-STAR SWITCH: Royals right-hander Aaron Crow may have made the All-Star team as a reliever, but Kansas City manager Ned Yost sees the team's former first-rounder as a starter down the line, as soon as next spring. [MLB.com]

DOCTOR MAY NAME NAMES: Canadian Dr. Anthony Galea has pleaded guilty to a felony charge of bringing unapproved drugs into the United States to treat athletes, and he may be pressed to give the names of athletes he treated and gave illegal drugs. Jose Reyes and Carlos Beltran of the Mets are among the players who have been treated by Galea in the past. [New York Times]

BORAS SPEAKS AT SABR: Super-agent Scott Boras talked of his love of baseball at the Society for American Baseball Research's annual conference on Thursday. Boras talked about his first superstar -- a cow on his family's farm. [Orange County Register]

SCHILLING TALKS PEDS: Former All-Star Curt Schilling went on a Philadelphia radio station Wednesday and said that no "team in the last 20 years that's won clean." Schilling said he thinks the recent decline in offensive numbers are because of MLB's testing policies. [SportsRadioInterviews.com]

NO TAPE MEASURE NEEDED: Ever wonder how they calculate home-run distances so quickly? There's a chart, of course, but how is that chart made? Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch has that story.

CRADLE OF MANAGERS: The Kansas City A's didn't produce a lot of wins, but they did produce their fair share of managers. Tommy Lasorda, Billy Martin, Whitey Herzog, Joe Morgan (not the Hall of Famer, but the former Red Sox manager), Dick Williams, Hank Bauer, Dick Howser and Tony La Russa all played for the A's in KC. Two of the game's more successful coaches, Dave Duncan and Charlie Lau, also played for the A's during their stint in Kansas City. [Joe Posnanski]

SLUGGER EMPATHY: Twins designated hitter Jim Thome said it wasn't his place to comment on Adam Dunn's struggles, but said he did empathize with the struggling Chicago DH. "As a guy who swings and misses and has struck out a ton, it's hard," Thome told the Chicago Tribune. "When you can have success and are blessed to play a long time and [then go through] those periods, it's tough."

NO STARS FOR ALL-STARS: Major League Baseball has added stars to the uniforms of All-Stars, but apparently the designations are purely optional, as the Cardinals' three All-Stars declined to take part to keep their uniforms uniform. [St. Louis Post-Dispatch]

STARLING UNDECIDED: The Royals took a gamble when they picked prep outfielder Bubba Starling with the fifth overall pick in last month's draft, as Starling is also a top-flight quarterback committed to Nebraska. Starling told the Kansas City Star he hasn't decided whether he's going to play football for Nebraska or sign with the Royals for millions of dollars. Starling said he's going to Lincoln, Neb., on Saturday and will work out with the team, but won't enroll in classes for the summer.

SAVES RECORD: You need more evidence they keep stats for everything? Braves closer Craig Kimbrel has set the record for most first-half saves by a rookie. Kimbrel's 27th save Thursday broke the record of 26 set by Boston's Jonathan Papelbon in 2006. [Atlanta Journal-Constitution]

LAWRIE PROGRESSING: Just before he was scheduled to be called up in May, Blue Jays prospect Brett Lawrie suffered a broken hand after being hit by a pitch. Lawrie began hitting off a tee earlier this week, and he's improving. The team doesn't expect him to be able to play in games until August. [MLB.com]

ROYAL SHAME: The Royals have once again taken the cheap route in their tribute to the Nergro Leagues, ditching the vintage uniforms. While there are many good signs for the Royals' future, this is a reminder that David Glass is still the owner. [Kansas City Star]

MYTHBUSTER: Scientists are using a lab at Washington State to measure some baseball physics. Among the findings, corked bats don't work, humidors do, and the balls from 2004 performed the same as a ball from the late 70s. [Popular Mechanics]

REMEMBERING BUDDIN: Former Red Sox shortstop Dan Buddin died last week. He's remembered mostly for not being very good -- he averaged 30 errors a year and didn't hit very well, either. A really good remembrance by FanGraphs.com's Alex Remington on the man Boston booed.

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