Tag:Mike Adams
Posted on: July 21, 2011 9:42 am
 

Padres owner says Adams won't be traded

Mike AdamsBy C. Trent Rosecrans

One of the hottest names on the trade market is Padres reliever Mike Adams, but team owner Jeff Moorad has told Adams he won't be traded, Yahoo!'s Jeff Passan writes.

Citing a team source, Passan reports Moorad told the right-handed reliever, "you're not going anywhere."

Adams, 33, is 3-1 with a 1.23 ERA, striking out 43 batters and walking nine in 44 innings. He's allowed just 23 hits, for a WHIP of .727. Most importantly, he's under team control for 2012, his last season of arbitration. That's what makes him more valuable in many team's eyes than Padres closer Heath Bell -- any team that acquires him can count on his services for not just this season, but next season as well. He will likely get a nice raise from the $2.533 million he earns this season.

Bell has been linked to just about every team still in the hunt. Passan says 12 teams have inquired on Adams. That would likely include the Red Sox, Rangers, Phillies, Yankees and Brewers.

Moorad knows the game, he's a former agent, so he could just be trying to play a game to improve his leverage or he could really want to keep Adams and use him as a closer after Bell departs.

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Posted on: July 18, 2011 9:30 pm
Edited on: July 18, 2011 9:36 pm
 

Angels GM says he can add payroll

Tony ReaginsBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Angels general manager Tony Reagins says he's hasn't been given orders not to spend money at the trade deadline, as had been reported recently.

"I haven't been limited in any way," Reagins told Bill Plunkett of the Orange County Register. "I've never had a conversation of that sort with Arte [Moreno] and any writer who writes something like that is misinformed."

However, the Angels currently have a $140 million payroll with approximately $28 million going to Scott Kazmir, Kendrys Morales and Gary Matthews Jr. That doesn't even take into offseason additions of Vernon Wells, Hisanori Takahashi and Scott Downs -- none of whom came cheap.

The Angels have come up in rumors about Mets outfielder Carlos Beltran and Cubs third baseman Aramis Ramirez. Another name that's popped up is Kansas City's Wilson Betemit and Melky Cabrera. There's also San Diego relievers Heath Bell and Mike Adams, who are the top relievers available.

Anaheim is entered Monday four games behind Texas in the American League West and could use some help in the bullpen and on offense. 

"You always look to upgrade if you can. If the right situation comes along, we'll be open to it," Reagins said. ""But the biggest improvement is going to come from within.

"Each situation [in the past, such as Mark Teixeira in 2008, Scott Kazmir in 2009 and Dan Haren last season] was trying to put the club in position to win a championship. … If that situation presents itself at this deadline, we'll be ready to act."

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Posted on: July 18, 2011 2:05 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 2:14 pm
 

Trade Deadline Primer: AL West

By Eye on Baseball Team

Baseball's trade deadline is just 13 days away. The rumor mill is certainly spinning, but we've only really seen one big move -- the Brewers acquiring Francisco Rodriguez. In the upcoming days we'll take a glance around baseball and sort out what we can expect to see from each major-league team. First up, the AL West, a division that saw several deadline deals last season, including an intradivisional Cliff Lee deal (though that happened in early July). It doesn't appear the landscape is ripe for another blockbuster like that, but let's dive in.

Texas Rangers
Status: Buyers
Upgrade needed: Pitching, both starting and relief.
Possible matches: Padres, Marlins, Nationals, A's, Mariners
Notes: If the Rangers continue to win at this pace and create big separation in the AL West -- they're currently up four games and have won 11 in a row -- they won't feel the need to make a big splash. They have reportedly talked to the Marlins about pitching, with Anibal Sanchez, Ricky Nolasco and Leo Nunez as possibilities (Jon Paul Morosi of Fox Sports). Danny Knobler of CBSSports.com reports, however, that the Marlins aren't going to move Nolasco or Sanchez. Evan Grant of Rangers Blog reports the Rangers are interested in Heath Bell, Mike Adams, Andrew Bailey and Brandon League -- though Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle says the A's would have to be overwhelmed to move Bailey, since he's under team control until 2014. Ken Rosenthal of Fox Sports also has the Rangers in on Bell, Adams, Bailey and throws in Tyler Clippard of the Nationals. Buster Olney of ESPN says the Rangers are the "leaders" in the Bell/Adams sweepstakes. I'd expect the Rangers to do whatever it takes, within reason, to get to the World Series again.

Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim
Status: Frugal buyers
Upgrade needed: Could use more pitching and another bat.
Possible matches: They'd have to shed payroll first, so none at this point.
Notes: Thanks to several high-priced acquisitions in recent memory (Vernon Wells, c'mon down!) the word is the Angels don't want to increase the payroll -- even though general manager Tony Reagins denies that assertation, there's evidence to suggest it. So, while they'd probably like to upgrade several areas -- coincidentally, an upgrade over Wells would be nice -- there won't be much flexibility. Expect the Angels to make minor trades at the absolute maximum. UPDATE: Rosenthal reports Aramis Ramirez is on the Angels' wish list, but that Ramirez still has no intention of waving his no-trade clause for anyone -- at least until after July 31. This is interesting on several levels. Going after Ramirez would completely contradict the notion that the Angels aren't adding payroll. Not only is Ramirez making a pretty penny this season, but a trade would cause a $16 million option for next season to vest. Also, Ramirez's insistence on not leaving starts to make you wonder if he knows the Cubs will pick up his option after the season.

Seattle Mariners
Status: In limbo, but probably sellers.
Players available: Doug Fister, Jason Vargas, Erik Bedard, Brandon League.
Notes: We can't really be sure how things stand just yet. The Mariners were all set to be buyers and were reportedly interested in upgrading the offense, for example. But they've now lost nine in a row and -- teamed with the Rangers' winning streak -- that has buried them. I can't see a reason to move Felix Hernandez, and the Mariners won't, but some are sure to speculate about him. Just take those "rumors" with a grain of salt. All-Star reliever Brandon League could fetch a decent return and, when the Mariners decide to start selling, Bedard seems like a name that could be involved in any trade talks. Knobler also reports that Vargas and Fister are available -- and points out Hernandez and Michael Pineda are not.

Oakland Athletics
Status: Sellers
Players available: Josh Willingham, Coco Crisp, David DeJesus, Conor Jackson and Michael Wuertz. Probably several more, too.
Possible matches: Pretty much any buyer.
Notes: You have to figure at least three of the above players are shipped somewhere. Things will probably go down to the wire, as none are huge difference makers and will probably be last resorts on July 31. Willingham could go sooner, as he's being dangled, it's just that not many teams are overly excited about him. The Pirates are said to be in on him, but could be setting their sights higher on Hunter Pence.

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Posted on: July 5, 2011 10:35 am
Edited on: July 5, 2011 2:10 pm
 

Pepper: Dee Gordon 'wants to be great'; demoted


If you had one game to win, would you start Justin Verlander, Jon Lester or CC Sabathia? C. Trent Rosecrans joins Lauren Shehadi to answer that question and more.

By Evan Brunell


RETURN PENDING: Dodgers shortstop Dee Gordon is being sent out to Triple-A to make room for Rafael Furcal's return, but if manager Don Mattingly knows what he's talking about, Gordon will be back at some point.

The scrawny son of Tom Gordon hit .232/.250/.280 in 85 plate appearances, just flat out awful numbers, and it's hard to think that his complete and utter lack of power is being exposed. Sure, there are plenty of successful slap hitters in the bigs, but even they have a modicum of power. When you look at Gordon, you certainly will have trouble finding any ounce of fat or muscle on him, so rifling line drives is a lot harder than for someone like Michael Bourn, who also has low power numbers.

Mattingly said that Gordon "showed [Mattingly] he wants to be great. That's the biggest thing."

"He has a real good feel for the game," GM Ned Colletti added. "He was able to slow things down more than not."

Maybe so, but the 23-year-old has a ways to go if he wants to be the Dodgers' future starter.  (Los Angeles Times)

ICE-CREAM TEAMS: Ice cream and baseball are as American as it gets, so it's no surprise that someone came up with corresponding ice-cream flavors for each baseball team. The Yankees being "vanilla" might sound odd given the term means ordinary, but let Timothy Malcom explain.

"The Yankees is and have been America’s most popular baseball team. It’s clean, it’s tradition, it’s even kind of predictable. But it’s always great, and always there at the end of the day. Damn Yankees."

Meanwhile, the poor Cubs get stuck with Neapolitan -- "Combine the tradition of the Vanilla Yankees, the sweet failure of the Chocolate Red Sox and the perennially optimistic Midwest following of the Strawberry Cardinals, and you have this wonderful combination of baseball’s top tier. The problem, of course, is nobody ever buys Neapolitan." (Timothy Malcom)

HAUNTED HOTEL: Humberto Quintero is currently at Houston's Triple-A affiliate on a rehab assignment for an injury. The backstop's team completed a game in Memphis, Tenn. and departed back to Oklahoma City afterward. Quintero hung back for the night, but had to switch hotels after two murders took place. I'd switch, too. (MLB.com)

HIGH-SCHOOL MEMORIES: The last time Laynce Nix played first base was in high school. Before Monday, that is. Slammed with injuries, Nationals manager asked Nix, an outfielder, if he had ever played first. After hearing that Nix did so in high school, Johnson decided that was good enough and sent Nix out to first base for the seventh inning. “It was pretty wild, I’m still trying to figure out how that worked out,” Nix said. “But it was fun.” (Washington Times)

PRIVATE PITCHERS: Cubs manager Mike Quade wonders if pitchers should have the chance to warm up privately. He's not referring to the standard mid-inning tosses, but rather when a pitcher is forced to enter the game without warming up in the bullpen due to a pitcher's injury. In these cases, he can warm up for as long as he needs on the mound, but he can't get ready in the bullpen. Why not, Quade asks. ‘‘If a guy’s more comfortable doing his thing [in the bullpen], I’d rather have him [do that] because of the urgency once you get on the mound and everybody’s watching.’’ Interesting idea, but if the dude is expected to pitch in a game on that mound in front of a national TV audience and crowd, he can handle warming up. (Chicago Sun-Times)

WHY? A 4.47 ERA doesn't quite lend itself to being called a setup man, especially Kameron Loe, who has given up lead after lead this season despite not being notably any worse than last year. Fans are getting fed up with Loe, who blew a lead Monday as Milwaukee went on to lose. So why did Loe get the ball? Simple, says Brewers manager Ron Roenicke: lefty Zach Braddock was tired and the club isn't prepared to throw Takashi Saito, who has missed the entire season to date due to injury until coming off the DL mere days ago, into the fire that quickly. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

TOUGH CHOICE: Giants manager Bruce Bochy said he had a terrible time trying to figure out which Padres reliever to name to the All-Star Game: Heath Bell or Mike Adams? In the end, he took the closer -- but if and when Bell is traded this month, Adams will take over closing duties. (San Diego Union-Tribune)

MISERABLE: Clay Buchholz admitted he is "getting a little miserable" with the back problems that have yet to get better and have left him on the DL for 2 1/2 weeks, already past the projected return date. The righty is seeing a back specialist and will simply have to wait things out before returning to the Red Sox rotation. (WEEI)

GARLAND DONE? Part of what has made Jon Garland so appealing to teams is his durability. Well, 2011 certainly won't be part of his resume after his second trip to the disabled list has gone on for a month with right-shoulder inflammation and threatens his entire year. The right-hander will get a second opinion, but the Dodgers pitcher is likely done for the year whether he goes under the knife or not. (ESPN Los Angeles)

TIME FOR SPRING TRAINING: Johan Santana threw off a mound Monday and had no setbacks, so Santana will now begin his version of spring training. Don't count on a return from the lefty until mid-August, at which point this Mets team could have an entirely different look thanks to the trade deadline. (New York Post)

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Posted on: June 28, 2011 9:54 pm
 

Cardinals interested in Bell, Bartlett

By Evan Brunell

BellThe Cardinals are attempting to trade for both Heath Bell and Jason Bartlett from San Diego, the New York Post reports.

St. Louis has mixed and matched at closer the entire season, and Bell would immediately slot in as a proven closer. While Fernando Salas, a rookie, has locked down the ninth inning as of late by converting 10 straight saves and 12 overall, he's still an unproven rookie. Although the Cardinals have had success with unproven rookies becoming closers, as Adam Wainwright was a major reason the Cardinals walked away with the 2006 championship.

However, St. Louis' bullpen as a whole has struggled, registering a 4.19 ERA, good for 23rd in baseball. Adding Bell would allow the Cardinals to lengthen the bullpen by putting Salas in a setup role and pushing everyone down a spot, which can't help but dramatically improve the bullpen. Bell has saved 55 of his last 56 chances and boasts a 2.53 ERA on the season, although his strikeout rate has declined to seven per nine innings after registering in the double-digits over the last two seasons.

Bartlett, meanwhile, would solve the Cardinals' gaping hole at shortstop. While Ryan Theriot has surprised with the stick and raised St. Louis' level of grittiness, he's been porous in the field and could use a shift to second. Bartlett, who was acquired in the offseason, boasts a slick glove and hit .320 in 2009, although he's down to .249 with San Diego. Acquiring both Bell and Bartlett would dramatically improve the Cards' chances of hanging tough with the Brewers and Reds, while San Diego is 10 1/2 games out of first and needs to look to next season as they continue their post-Adrian Gonzalez era.

The Post also notes that the Yankees want Mike Adams from the Padres, but the righty's price tag will be large given he is San Diego's closer of the future.

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Posted on: May 19, 2011 2:23 pm
 

West's crew making more friends each day

By Matt Snyder

Stop me when you've heard this one before: There are some players complaining about Joe West's umpiring crew.

Yeah, I know ... pretty far-fetched, huh? (For my feelings on the crew, you can click here to read something I wrote a few weeks ago)

Anyway, Tuesday night, Eric Patterson of the Padres was deemed to have left third base early on a would-be sacrifice fly in the second inning by Joe West. One problem, at least according to the Padres, was that West wasn't even looking at Patterson. Nope, Padres' relief pitcher Mike Adams said that Wednesday a few of the players reviewed the video of their loss and noticed West wasn't even looking at Patterson. As Adams explained it to the North County Times, he made sure to point out that the Padres' players weren't exactly shocked, considering the source.

"As soon as it ended, a lot of us went in to go take a look at it," Adams said. "You really don't expect anything less out of that crew."

He wasn't done.

"There's a reason (West and Angel Hernandez) were voted two of the top three worst (umpires) in the big leagues. It seems like they've always got to be part of the game."

Lost in the mix of the incompetence of West, Hernandez, et al is that Padres manager Bud Black actually has a salient point about using video review. Situations like these are precisely where it would make sense. I'm not exactly for reviewing every single play, but whether or not a player leaves early on a fly ball is easily reviewable via video -- and also something that's pretty difficult for umpires to judge even if they are paying attention.

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Posted on: November 4, 2010 8:00 pm
Edited on: November 4, 2010 8:27 pm
 

Pads expect Gonzalez to explore free agency

Adrian Gonzalez Padres general manager Jed Hoyer said he expects Adrian Gonzalez to begin 2011 in San Diego, but doesn't foresee an extension before next offseason.

Hoyer told MLB.com's Corey Brock (via Twitter ) that it's a "near-certainty" that Gonzalez wants to explore free agency. The team picked up his $6.2 million option earlier this week.

"My expectation is [Gonzalez] will be a Padre [to begin] in 2011," Hoyer told Brock.

However, Hoyer did say the team would listen to any offers for Gonzalez.

UPDATE: According to Dan Hayes of the North County Times (via Twitter ), Hoyer said the team is open to talks for closer Heath Bell. Hoyer said the team has two potential closers in Luke Gregerson and Mike Adams.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

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Posted on: October 8, 2010 9:28 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 11:56 am
 

R.I.P. Padres: Big year ends with collapse

As the sports world waits for the crowning of a champion, 22 other teams are busy preparing for spring training. What went wrong for these teams, and what does 2011 hold? MLB Facts and Rumors here at CBS Sports will be answering those questions through all of October. Today: The San Diego Padres.

Few people expected to see the Padres in the playoffs, and in the end, nobody did.

But San Diego’s postseason hopes were supposed to be buried by about June, not the last weekend of the season with a crushing collapse. The Padres spent most of the season in first place in the National League West behind a tremendous pitching staff, only to find that in the end their lack of offense would do them in.

What they accomplished was impressive considering they had the second-lowest payroll in baseball, but Padres fans will remember 2010 for what might have been.

WHAT WENT WRONG

In a word, September. The Padres entered the month in the clutches of a 10-game losing streak that turned their season the wrong direction, and they couldn’t regroup.

Miguel Tejada San Diego went 14-17 after September 1, batting .229 and failing to score more than a run nine times. Clinging to a half-game division lead on September 25, the Padres lost five of their last eight (three by shutout), capped by a 3-0 loss on the final day of the season that gave the division to the Giants and left them out of the playoff picture.

Adding Ryan Ludwick at the deadline looked like a great move, exactly what they needed to give the offense some punch. But moving to cavernous Petco Park, Ludwick’s batting average dropped 80 points after the trade to .211, and his slugging percentage dropped more than 150 points to a miserable .330.

Injuries didn’t help matters. David Eckstein, Jerry Hairston, Everth Cabrera and Tony Gwynn Jr. missed big chunks of the season, as did pitcher Chris Young.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

The pitching, particularly the lights-out bullpen, was tremendous. The relief corps, led by Mike Adams, Luke Gregorson and Heath Bell, had baseball’s lowest ERA, 2.81, and limited hitters to a .220 average. If the starting pitcher left with a lead, it was all but over for the opposition.

Speaking of starting pitchers, the Padres’s top three – Clayton Richard, Jon Garland and Mat Latos -- each won 14 games. Latos went through a streak of near-invincibility, going a major-league record 15 consecutive starts giving up two or fewer earned runs between June and September.

All-Star Adrian Gonzalez was the offensive highlight, batting .298 with 31 homers and 101 RBI, which not only led the team but was 43 more than the next-highest total. Jerry Hairston was a huge spark off the bench, playing five positions and racking up 50 RBI despite batting a modest .244.

HELP ON THE WAY

With the Padres fighting for a postseason berth, Simon Castro didn’t get a September callup, but the right-handed starter is right at the top of San Diego’s prospects list. He struggled after going up to Triple-A, but the 22-year-old has a bright future.

A bit farther away is 20-year-old outfielder Jaff Decker, a left-hander power hitter who will be moving up fast from Class A.
 
EXPECTATIONS FOR 2011

The arms are there for another run at the playoffs. The entire bullpen (barring trades) returns, and they have a nice stable of starters. If they can fix their obvious offensive shortcomings, they won’t be catching anyone by surprise next year.

Adrian Gonzalez SUGGESTIONS FOR 2011

Owner Jeff Moorad says he won’t allow Gonzalez to be traded before next season, which is a good thing. Even if you could get multiple offensive pieces in return, consider Gonzalez your bird in the hand. There might be no other player in baseball who represents a bigger chunk of his team’s offense, and his $5.5 million option is reasonable.

Young’s $8.5 million option, on the other hand, is not realistic. That would represent nearly a quarter of the team’s payroll, and given his injury history and the team’s other options, they can’t do it. Bell is in his final year of arbitration and will get a raise, and the Padres have to consider trying to lock him up long-term.

Re-sign Eckstein, which shouldn’t cost much. Try to get Hairston back. And look for bargain offensive help that can hit in the gaps.

2011 PREDICTION

You can’t count on the Padres repeating their across-the-board pitching excellence, so it’s going to take more than a token offensive improvement to make them a viable contender. There’s some talent rising up in the division, and it will be tough for the Padres to keep pace with their payroll.

Check out the rest of the R.I.P. reports here.

-- David Andriesen

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com