Tag:Mike Quade
Posted on: July 4, 2011 1:03 pm
Edited on: July 4, 2011 1:20 pm
 

Cubs unsure when Dempster will return

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Ryan DempsterCubs starter Ryan Dempster was scratched from his team's Monday game against the Nationals with "intestinal issues" and manager Mike Quade seemed just as unsure about what was wrong with Dempster as when the right-hander would be able to make another start.

"It just seems like it's a product of his intestinal issues over the last couple of days," Quade told reporters, including Paul Sullivan of the Chicago Tribune. "I'm not smart enough to know that, but it's his whole [core] region."

Dempster was hospitalized on Saturday night, but released on Sunday. Dempster said he'd like to start again before the All-Star break, but Quade noted he'd like to see him throw off a mound before another start.

Casey Coleman started Monday's game for Dempster. 

With Dempster missing Monday's start, all five of the starters in the Cubs' rotation at the beginning of the season have missed at least one start. Carlos Zamrbano (back) and Andrew Cashner (shoulder) are currently on the disabled list. Ramon Ortiz will start in Zambrano's place Tuesday against the Nationals.

The 34-year-old Dempster is 5-6 with a 4.99 ERA in 18 starts.

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Posted on: July 2, 2011 1:30 am
Edited on: July 2, 2011 1:46 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Ellis likes Colorado



By Matt Snyder

Mark Ellis, Rockies. Well, if one day is a harbinger of things to come, the Rockies' acquisition of Ellis via trade was the correct move. Ellis had played all 1,056 games of his major-league career in an Oakland uniform before Friday night. The Rockies needed some offensive punch and didn't have much flexibility in terms of money or prospects they wanted to deal, so they took a shot on Ellis -- who just lost his starting job for the A's to Jemile Weeks. All Ellis did was go 3-5 with a double, home run, two runs and three RBI. Decent debut, eh? Obviously, Ellis isn't going to immediately transform into a beast, but he's in a cushy lineup spot -- behind Carlos Gonzalez and protected by Todd Helton and Troy Tulowitzki. The Rockies went on to win 9-0 over the Royals, so while it was likely pretty weird to play for a different team, Ellis had to have had a fun night in his new uniform.

Alexi Ogando, Rangers. Ogando, the Rangers and all Rangers fans can breathe a sigh of relief. Ogando started the season 7-0 with a 2.10 ERA, but most advanced metrics showed he was fortunate in terms of balls in play and several other measures. He had also not started more than seven games since 2007 ... in the Dominican Summer League. So when Ogando went 0-3 with a 9.31 ERA in his next three starts, the worries that he was in a permanent tailspin started to surface. Friday night's outing should, at least temporarily, alleviate those concerns. Ogando took a perfect game into the fifth and a shutout into the seventh against the Marlins. He finished with 6 2/3 innings, eight strikeouts, five hits, two earned runs and two walks. He picked up his eighth win of the season. Though Ogando faltered a bit in the seventh, this outing has to be very encouraging.

Justin Masterson, Indians. It's not the best measure of a pitcher -- considering run support and defense play such a huge factor -- but Masterson hadn't won a game since April 26. He started the season 5-0 and entered Friday night 5-6, despite a 2.08 ERA in his previous four starts. And unfortunately lots of pitchers have been trained to believe the only thing that matters are the wins and losses (which I would agree with if this was an individual sport, but I digress), so good for Masterson on picking up the win Friday. He went eight strong innings, allowing only four hits, one walk and one earned run while striking out five. He lowered his ERA to 2.85 and is having quite the season. Meanwhile, the Indians moved back into first place in the AL Central.



Mike Quade, Cubs. Randy Wells came into Friday with a 6.25 ERA and 1.64 WHIP on the season. He gave up two runs in the top of the first inning to the White Sox. After that, he settled in and pitched very well for the next five innings. Still, Quade had Kerry Wood fresh off the DL, along with Sean Marshall and Carlos Marmol at the back-end of his bullpen. It's actually the only true strength the Cubs have. It was fine to run Wells out there for the seventh inning, but once he allowed a single and game-tying home run, it was probably enough to go to the 'pen. Nah, Quade let him stay in. When Wells gave up a single to Rios, Quade let him stay. A ground out from Gordon Beckham advanced the go-ahead run to second base and a walk to Adam Dunn meant Wells had allowed four of five guys he faced to reach base in the seventh. Keep in mind, Dunn has one hit in about a billion at-bats against left-handers this season and Marshall is left-handed. Plus, Juan Pierre was on deck and is also a lefty. Nah, Quade stuck with Wells. Pierre tripled in two and the game was over. To Quade's credit, he took the blame after the game (Paul Sullivan via Twitter), but this shouldn't be happening. I realize the bullpen threw 12 innings the day before, but the three-man back-end was fine to get the job done.

Frank Francisco, Blue Jays. He's not doing much to endear himself to Blue Jays' fans, is he? Francisco entered the game Friday afternoon with a one-run lead. The Jays had taken the lead with a huge Jose Bautista two-run shot in the seventh. And it was Canada Day. Francisco went out and coughed up the game nearly as efficiently as he could have. He walked Placido Polanco and then gave up a double to Chase Utley and a single to Ryan Howard -- which plated two runs and put the Phillies on top. Francisco now has nine saves but four blown saves and an ERA of 5.01.

Padres offense. Before we get into the Padres here, let's give Jason Vargas some credit. The Mariners' starter has now thrown two shutouts in his past three outings. That's outstanding, though the second one comes with a bit of an asterisk. You see, the Padres now have 13 shutout losses. In 83 games. So, basically, 16 percent of the time the Padres play a game, they don't score a run. According to Stats, Inc., this is the most shutout losses for a team prior to the All-Star break since 2004, when the Expos were shutout 13 times. And we still have more than a week of games left. In the Padres' nine games before the break, all nine are in pitcher's parks (Safeco Field, AT&T Park and Dodger Stadium). They'll see Michael Pineda, Tim Lincecum and Matt Cain among other solid starters. Simply put: The smart money is on the Padres making dubious history before July 11.

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Posted on: June 28, 2011 2:16 pm
Edited on: June 28, 2011 4:11 pm
 

Quade added to NL coaching staff in All-Star Game

By Matt Snyder

Cubs manager Mike Quade has replaced former Nationals manager Jim Riggleman as a member of Bruce Bochy's National League All-Star staff. Quade joins Arizona's Kirk Gibson and the Giants coaching staff to support Bochy in the All-Star Game July 12 at Chase Field in Arizona.

The addition of Quade can't be based upon his Cubs' performance to date. The Cubs came into Tuesday with a 32-46 record and 11 1/2 games out of first place in the NL Central. They've faced injuries, sure, but so have a lot of other teams. Bochy naming Quade to the All-Star staff is instead likely a treat for the first-year manager of the Cubs.

As I noted on Twitter, maybe Bochy should let Quade coach third base. Bochy will surely use Giants third-base coach Tim Flannery, but Quade would work as well. In following the Cubs on a daily basis when Quade coached third, I can't remember a bad send or hold, whereas this season it's happened frequently with Ivan DeJesus as the Cubs third-base coach. It's only anecdotal evidence at my disposal, but I remember Quade being a stellar third-base coach.

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Category: MLB
Posted on: June 24, 2011 9:54 am
Edited on: June 24, 2011 4:41 pm
 

Pepper: Oswalt hints he may be done

By C. Trent Rosecrans

BASEBALL TODAY: Just why did Jim Riggleman ditch his job? CBSSports.com senior writer Danny Knobler joins Lauren Shehadi to discuss Riggleman, Ubaldo Jimenez and more. Check it out.

OSWALT END?: It's not just that Roy Oswalt is hurt -- leaving Thursday's start with the Cardinals after just two innings -- but that he may have pitched his last game ever.

Oswalt will not only likely miss his next start, he could also be done. He's already hinted at retirement and with a back injury, it may not be worth it for Oswalt to come back.

After Thursday's outing, Oswalt sounded anything but confident in his return. David Hale of the News Journal has a full transcript of Oswalt's postgame comments, and they don't sound like the comments of someone who is confident it'll be an easy road back.

Heres' the question and answer that says it all to me:

Q: Do you allow yourself to think about your career at this point?

A: I've had a pretty good one.

That sounds like someone who is content with walking away if he gets bad news soon.

We may know more Monday after his scheduled MRI.

HOT SEAT: Edwin Rodriguez didn't last a full calendar year as the Marlins manager and the Cubs' Mike Quade could follow that lead. Quade's on the hot seat (even if general manager Jim Hendry's seat should be hotter). [Chicago Tribune]

LI'L' GOOSE: Pirates manager Clint Hurdle compared closer Joel Hanrahan to Hall of Famer Goose Gossage, and after stifling a laugh, John Perrotto of the Beaver County Times takes a look at the comparison and sees some parallels.

SCOUTING DARVISH: Rangers general manager Jon Daniels was scheduled to see Japanese right-hander Yu Darvish's start on Friday. Darvish may be the top free-agent pitcher this season if he comes to the United States, as expected. The Braves and Twins reportedly had scouts at his last start, when he picked up just his second loss of the season. It was one of his worst starts of the season and he still gave up just one earned run, allowing nine hits and striking out 10 in eight innings. [YakyuBaka.com]

A'S OPEN TO DEAL: The sharks are circling in Oakland, as scouts have been checking out outfielder Josh Willingham, infielder Mark Ellis and left-handed relievers Craig Breslow and Brian Fuentes. [San Francisco Chronicle]

ANOTHER LOOK: Diamondbacks pitcher Josh Collmenter, he of the tomahawk motion, looks forward to facing teams another time so he can prove he's more than a gimmick pitcher. We'll see. [MLB.com]

NICE RIDE: The Toledo Mud Hens players are going to miss Brandon Inge, who was activated by the Tigers on Thursday. During his rehab trip with Detroit's Triple-A team, Inge sprung for a limo for several players to take them from Louisville, Ky., to Columbus, Ohio, skipping the planned bus ride. [Detroit News]

DEJA VU: A St. Louis ace 1-7 through June? (Well, now 2-7 after Thursday night's 2-7) It's been done before. Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Dispatch  compares Chris Carpenter's 1-7 start to that of John Tudor's 26 years ago. 

CABRERA'S CASE POSTPONED: The hearing for Detroit first baseman Miguel Cabrera's DUI arrest has been postponed again and rescheduled for July 12. That's the day of the All-Star Game. Cabrera, however, isn't required to be present for this hearing, though, so he can still go to the All-Star Game. [Detroit News]

NO DECISION: Pirates general manager Neal Huntington said he'd prefer not to negotiate during the season (and that doesn't make Jim Riggleman happy), but said it's not a rule. Pittsburgh starter Paul Maholm has said he'd like to sign an extension to stay in Pittsburgh. [MLB.com]

GARDNER'S D: A cool story here from ESPNNewYork.com's Mark Simon looking at the defense of Brett Gardner by talking to scouts, players and stats folks. 

BUCCO FEVER: If you haven't noticed, the Pirates (yes, the team in Pittsburgh) are in a pennant race. Sure, it's not even July yet, but we're talking the Pirates. The folks in Pittsburgh are beginning to take notice. [Pittsburgh Tribune-Review]

LAWRIE DELAYED: Blue Jays prospect Brett Lawrie was all but set to be called up at the beginning of the month, but before he could get the call, he was hit by a pitch and broke his left hand. Now he's having trouble gripping the bat and may not be ready until August. [CBCSports.ca]

FIGGINS DILEMMA: If you're following the Mariners, there's plenty of positives around the team -- including a record just a game under .500. But there's one big concern, Chone Figgins. The question for the Mariners is what to do with Figgins, who has two years and $17 million left on his contract. [Seattle Times]

BROXTON'S RETURN: Even when Jonathan Broxton comes off the disabled list, he won't automatically return to closing for the Dodgers, manager Don Mattingly said. [Los Angeles Times]

RETURN OF THE SPITTER: Here's an interesting theory (that I'm pretty sure I don't buy, but still interesting to think about) from Mat Kovach of the Hardball Times -- is the rise of pitching because of the return of the spitball?

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Posted on: June 15, 2011 9:26 pm
Edited on: June 15, 2011 9:50 pm
 

Ricketts fine with Cubs' status quo

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Tom RickettsCubs chairman Tom Ricketts said the team would have the means to spend in the free-agent market this offseason, but whether it chooses to do so will be at the discretion of general manager Jim Hendry, not the ownership group.

"We do have a lot of money coming off the books, everyone's aware of that," Ricketts told reporters before the Cubs' game with the Brewers (via the Chicago Sun-Times). "Whether or not that goes back into a large free agent contract will be Jim's decision."

Recently there was a report from the Los Angeles Times that the Cubs were one of nine teams in violation of MLB's debt-service rules, as well as another report from the Sun-Times citing a source that the way the team was purchased would preclude the team pursuing a big-ticket free agent in the next couple of years.

Still, when asked if the Cubs could afford to keep payroll at its current level -- with the stipulation that $50 million comes off the books from expiring contracts -- Ricketts sidestepped the issue.

"Even if we knew where it was going, we wouldn't talk about it," Ricketts said. "We don't talk about where we're heading on payroll. We'll make that decision at some point later this year when we see what's all available and we go through all the possible options."

Ricketts also backed Hendry -- saying he has "100 percent confidence in Jim" -- and manager Mike Quade.

"I think Mike's done a great job," Ricketts said. "Mike's got those guys playing hard. You know they're not giving up, and there's a good spirit in the clubhouse. So those guys' [jobs] are fine."

There's plenty more in the interview, including Ricketts saying he doesn't see the team leaving Wrigley Field anytime soon.

So, in summary, Ricketts is fine with the status quo -- and with a team 12 games under .500 and declining attendance, why shouldn't he be?

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Posted on: June 6, 2011 10:12 am
Edited on: June 6, 2011 10:35 am
 

Pepper: No baseball in November



Can Zack Greinke continue to lead the Brewers? What is going on with Cliff Lee? How important is Josh Hamilton to the Rangers? Scott Miller joins Lauren Shehadi with the answers.

By Evan Brunell


NO BASEBALL IN NOVEMBER
: As baseball tries to expand the postseason to one additional Wild Card series, the question has always been how that can be pulled off without pushing the postseason into November, which both fans and players dislike. Angels manager Mike Scioscia feels the postseason can be limited to just October and accommodate an expansion without eating into the 162-game season.

Scioscia, who is part of a special committee for on-field matters and has input into the expansion of the playoffs, feels that by tightening up travel time and playing the occasional doubleheader, an extra series can be fitted in easily. In regards to travel, Scioscia points to his own team's upcoming trip from L.A. to Seattle, New York, Florida and back to Los Angeles as inefficient because of two off days during the trip.

"I don't know what kindergartner figured that one out, but I think maybe we can move to first grade and get that a little better organized," Scioscia said. "The bottom line is we need to be more efficient with travel."

Scioscia believes teams should play in the division for the bulk of April, July and September, which will cut down on travel, as well as schedule the occasional double-header. If baseball can trim the postseason by a few days as well, the World Series would be complete by the time Halloween rolls around.

"We can't have baseball played in November," Scioscia said. "I don't think the Pilgrims set it up that way." (Los Angeles Times)

SLEEPLESS IN CHICAGO
: Cubs manager Mike Quade admitted after Albert Pujols' 12th inning walk-off home run on Saturday that he needs to do a better job communicating with his pitcher and catcher on what to do in these type of situations. Clearly, he's got some more work to do as Pujols repeated his walk-off home run heroics in the 10th inning Sunday. (MLB.com)

DEAD BALL
: The Phillies won Sunday's game 7-3, but that doesn't mask what was a missed opportunity to score an extra run for Philadelphia. Through no fault of the team, Domonic Brown's single hit the umpire at second base and was immediately ruled a dead ball. There were runners on first and third, but Ryan Howard, on third, was not allowed to advance. The bases were loaded for Wilson Valdez, who grounded into an inning-ending double play. Just overall a weird play and a weird result -- you'd think Howard would be able to score on that play. (MLB.com)

EJECTED
: Jason Marquis was ejected from the game Sunday after plunking Justin Upton for the fourth time in the four-game series. Both Marquis and manager Jim Riggleman were adamant that the HBP was not intentional after two Nationals got hit in the inning previous. You can believe that, as the game was currently 1-0 and Upton represented the go-ahead run on base. (MLB.com)

HARPER DOWN
: Touted Nationals prospect Bryce Harper was hit by a pitch on the left knee in the first inning, and had to leave the game after needing to hobble to the dugout. Good news, though: It appears to be just a bone bruise, so he should be back in the lineup before long. (Washington Post)

ZIMMERMAN REHABBING: In that same game in which Harper was struck by a pitch, third baseman Ryan Zimmerman began his comeback trail by going 2-for-2 with a walk. Zim had an ab tear way back on April 9 and is only just getting back into the fold. It's unclear when Zimmerman will return to Washington, but mid-June looks like a good bet. (MLB.com)

VERLANDER THE BEST? Jim Leyland's been around, so he's got plenty of first-hand experience on which pitcher has been the best to ever pitch for Leyland. The long-time skipper says Verlander has the best stuff of any pitcher he's seen without question, although he still calls Doug Drabek the best pitcher, as Verlander is still learning how to pitch. (MLB.com)

PERFECT IN TRIPLE-A
: Mike Minor has made two spot starts for the Braves due to Brandon Beachy's injury, but was shipped back to Triple-A as the club did not need a fifth starter for a while. Minor showed Atlanta he should be considered for the next spot start after taking a perfect game into the seventh and finishing up with a one-hitter through eight. (Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

TIME TO WAIT: Many in the game seemed to feel as if Brett Lawrie would be called up to Toronto last Friday. That changed when he was hit by a pitch, and that bruise has landed him on the seven-day DL although it was backdated to the point where he will only miss two games. Once Lawrie's pain subsides, he's expected to make his major-league debut. (MLB.com)

HITTING HINDERED: Luke Scott's torn labrum is affecting his hitting, he finally admitted on Sunday. Scott is hitting just .224 this year with six home runs and received a cortisone shot in the hopes that clears up the pain. For now, he's still avoiding any talk about surgery. (MASN)

BELTRAN BRUISED: Carlos Beltran has had a strong season so far, crushing a league-leading 19 doubles and playing in 57 of a possible 59 games. On Sunday, he had to leave the game with a bruise after fouling a ball off his right leg, but is considered day-to-day. (New York Times)

BACKSTOP HEALING: Nick Hundley bashed a home run in his rehab start on Sunday, proving his strained oblique has healed nicely. If he comes through his rehab assignment with no setbacks, he could be back in San Diego by Wednesday. (MLB.com)

MENTAL BREAKS: Jason Bay (New York Times) and Alex Rios (MLB.com) are both receiving mental breaks as both players are scuffling. Rios has been letting his frustrating seep out, so manager Ozzie Guillen feels as if Rios could benefit from a few days off. Bay, who has struggled mightily, will be back in the lineup when the team plays again Tuesday.

BATTING AROUND: Curious how many teams have batted around in the order during the first inning without recording an out? Well, the last time that happened was in 2006 when the Indians terrorized K.C. for seven runs before registering their first out, needing 10 hitters to do so. (Baseball Reference)

NEW JOB? Ozzie Guillen's on the hot seat in Chicago, so his job mixing drinks for a charity event could prove a harbinger of his future job. OK, not really. (White Sox Twitter)

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: May 16, 2011 11:43 pm
Edited on: May 16, 2011 11:54 pm
 

Quade fumes after Cubs blow game

By Matt Snyder

Things were going pretty well for the Cubs through 5 1/2 innings Monday night in Cincinnati. Carlos Pena had just hit a two-run home run -- his fourth in the past 11 games -- to put the Cubs on top 4-0. Starting pitcher Carlos Zambrano had only allowed one hit through his five shutout innings and really only needed to get through one more before handing the ball to Sean Marshall, Kerry Wood and Carlos Marmol.

Instead, things came unraveled. The Reds tagged the Cubs for a seven-spot in the sixth, en route to a 7-4 victory. After the game, Cubs manager Mike Quade reportedly let loose on his ballclub behind closed doors before seeing the media and venting his frustration.

"That was embarrassing and that [expletive] has got to stop," he said.

"Nothing's [expletive] easy up here. We're not good enough to coast at all in any aspect of the game," he continued. (CSNChicago.com via Twitter)

Quade also reportedly noted that he was including himself and that everyone needed to get better.

For whatever it's worth, Quade's tirade didn't seem to fall on deaf ears. Marlon Byrd told reporters he was sick of it and he starts with himself in terms of where improvement is needed. Zambrano also took the full burden of the blame.

"It was all my fault ... disappointed in myself," he said, also adding that he was sad to have let down his teammates. (Paul Sullivan via Twitter)

In the sixth inning, there were a number of factors that contributed to the Reds' seven runs. Zambrano walked Edgar Renteria with one on and Joey Votto on deck. Alfonso Soriano was nothing short of a debacle as he backpedaled on Scott Rolen's game-tying, RBI double (I'm not sure he could have caught it, but an average left fielder would have). Marcos Mateo threw a wild pitch on his first offering and it allowed Jay Bruce to score the Reds' go-ahead run. Mateo then gave Jonny Gomes a fastball on a silver platter that resulted in a two-run homer. Defensively, things could have been sharper from Aramis Ramirez and Kosuke Fukudome on separate occasions.

It was reported Quade was angry about "baserunning, defense and third base coach Ivan DeJesus' decision-making." (Chicago Tribune)

Quade and the Cubs could also be upset about back-to-back strikeouts by Soriano and Byrd to end the first inning after Homer Bailey had walked the bases loaded.

In related news, struggling outfielder Tyler Colvin has been optioned to Triple-A, which is absolutely the correct move. He's been awful at the plate this season (.113 with a .449 OPS) after a bit of a breakout last season (20 HRs in 358 at-bats), so he's in need of everyday at-bats to work through his issues.

The Cubs are 17-22 and six games out of first place in the NL Central.

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Posted on: May 14, 2011 9:07 pm
 

Colvin in need of at-bats, could be sent to farm

By Evan Brunell

ColvinTyler Colvin was able to grab 394 plate appearances last season and had no shortage of playing time in the early going.

Not so this year, as he has just 68 plate appearances, with just 11 at-bats in May and has struggled to the tune of a .113/.191/.258 line.

"It's been awful for Tyler," Cubs manager Mike Quade noted to MLB.com. Colvin has lost playing time due to the hot start of Kosuke Fukudome, and Alfonso Soriano has made it hard for Quade to justify giving him a day off as well. Plus, the Cubs' necessity in getting Carlos Pena out of his slump has forced them to trot out his name at first base as much as possible. Oh, and Colvin's competition off the bench for outfield at-bats is scorching hot.

"I haven't been able to find as many [at-bats for him] as I want," Quade said. "Other people are as responsible for that as Tyler. He's struggled for sure, but with our outfield playing the way it is, I've got a guy sitting on the bench who's tearing it up right now in Reed Johnson. [Colvin] understands his role as a bench guy but you want to keep him involved as well."

What's the solution?

It could mean a trip to the minors.

"We need to get him involved some way, somehow, and that's been on my mind the last few days," Quade said when asked if Colvin could be sent to Triple-A. "We'll see how this homestand plays out and take a look at that.

"It's a heck of a balance every day to try to keep [Colvin] involved and get him to where he was last year and contribute on that level," Quade added. "You're also trying to win ballgames and do justice to the other guys who are hitting. It's the worst part of my day [trying to determine what to do with Colvin]. The five guys who aren't playing bother me more than anybody else. That's been a really tough situation for Tyler."

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