Tag:Bobby Valentine
Posted on: October 4, 2011 10:48 am
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Francona wants to manage in 2012

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Terry Francona hopes to manage next season, according to a report from ESPN's Buster Olney.

Francona's contract was picked up by the Red Sox late last week. We looked at possible landing spots for Francona on Friday, noting that if he wants to manage in 2012, he'll certainly have a chance.

Olney also reported Phillies bench coach Pete Mackanin will be one of the people interviewed to replace Francona in Boston. Mackanin was also on our list of possible replacements. One name that wasn't on our list was Torey Lovullo, the Pawtucket Red Sox manager in 2010 who went with John Farrell to Toronto. Sports Illustrated's Jon Heyman tweeted that Lovullo would be considered, while he writes that Bobby Valentine and Joe Torre are not candidates.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: September 30, 2011 11:31 am
Edited on: September 30, 2011 5:32 pm
 

Francona's out, who's next in Boston?

Bobby ValentineBy C. Trent Rosecrans

So, Terry Francona is out in Boston… who's next?

Here's several ideas:

Bobby Valentine: For the first time in a long time, he's not the heir apparent in Miami, as Ozzie Guillen has become the latest manager Jeffrey Loria is itching to fire. Valentine, 61, is currently an ESPN announcer, but he's managed the Rangers and Mets, as well as two stints as the manager for Japan's Chiba Lotte Marines. In MLB, Valentine has a record of 1,117-1,072 and appeared in one World Series, losing to the Yankees as the Mets skipper in 2000.

DeMarlo Hale: It wouldn't be sexy, but it would be a link to the recent regime in Boston. Hale has served as Francona's bench coach the last two seasons and was previously the team's third-base coach. Last year he interviewed for the Blue Jays job, which went to then-Red Sox pitching coach John Farrell. However, he could be seen as too close to the former regime and not enough of a change.

Joe Torre: If you want a big name, there are few bigger in managerial circles. However, there's questions whether the 71-year-old would want to manage again and even as well as he put up with the madness that is managing the Yankees, why would he want to enter another circus? He also didn't exactly light the world on fire as the Dodgers' manager.

Dave Martinez: The Rays bench coach is going to be one of the hottest names in potential managerial searches until he gets a gig. He's served as Joe Maddon's bench coach since 2008. Martinez retired in 2001 after 16 seasons in the big leagues.

Pete Mackanin: The Phillies bench coach has been an interim manager twice, in Pittsburgh in 2005 and in Cincinnati in 2007.  He's been the Phillies' bench coach the last three seasons. Mackanin may not be seen as a big enough name for the Red Sox.

Don Wakamatsu: The former Mariners manager was the Blue Jays' bench coach last season. Wakamatsu had a strange exit in Seattle after what seemed like a players' revolt. He failed to get along with some of his players in Seattle, and with talk of problems in the Red Sox clubhouse during the last month of the season, Wakamatsu's past could be a red flag.

Eric Wedge: The current Mariners manager has been mentioned, but he's under contract and the Mariners seem happy with him. It doesn't make sense for the Mariners to let him go to Boston.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: August 22, 2011 12:40 pm
Edited on: August 22, 2011 5:03 pm
 

Video: ESPN catches Castro not paying attention

By Matt Snyder

Cubs shortstop Starlin Castro can swing the bat. We know that. He's hitting .308 with 28 doubles, eight triples and seven home runs. He also has an NL-leading 164 hits. He made the All-Star team this season and he's only 21 years old. But he also has 21 errors and has a negative defensive value by every measurable metric out there. It's not all necessarily due to lack of focus, but Sunday night on ESPN, Castro was caught red-handed on national TV not even facing home plate when a pitch was thrown.

See the video below:



The incident set off ESPN's color commentator -- and former MLB manager -- Bobby Valentine into a near-10 minute lecture about how Castro needs to better pay attention and that the Cubs' staff didn't even notice.

And he was right.

“Did he screw up?” manager Mike Quade asked (Chicago Tribune). “I don’t know. I can’t watch everything. I certainly try to. I manage a ballgame.”

Probably not coincidentally, Castro is not in the lineup for the Cubs' Monday night game against the Braves. Quade did tell reporters Sunday night he planned on watching the footage.

While it's true that it's inexcusable for Castro to have his mind elsewhere while playing defense, the criticism from Valentine was a bit over the top. He even went after how Castro eats sunflower seeds and basically said he was a cancer to the team because he doesn't know how to play the major-league game. Castro's 21 years old and far from the biggest problem the Cubs have. Yes, he needs to pay attention, but what he did wasn't worth the dressing-down he received.

And let's not forget Valentine had expressed interest in the Cubs' managerial position last year. Now, with a new general manager coming aboard, it's likely Quade is let go and the Cubs bring in a new manager for next season. Thus, some of Valentine's complaints about how much coaching Castro needs came off -- at least to me -- as him campaigning for the job.

Hat-tip: Big League Stew

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Posted on: August 5, 2011 3:39 pm
Edited on: August 5, 2011 3:41 pm
 

Guillen's son goes after Valentine

By C. Trent Rosecrans 

You ever wonder if Ozzie Guillen hopes his son would just shut up? Of course, shutting up is hardly a trait ingrained in the Guillen genes.

Since Kenny Williams has started ignoring Oney Guillen, Ozzie's son has a new nemesis, ESPN commentator Bobby Valentine. Why?

Well, Valentine tweeted something many of us have thought at some point this year:

 

Oney Guillen took offense, responding with this:

 
For the record, in the United States, Valentine has won 1,117 games and a National League pennant -- that's 1,117 more games and one more pennant than Oney Guillen.

The other interesting part of this potential feud is both Valentine and Ozzie Guillen will be popular names in the search for the Marlins' next manager.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: June 27, 2011 9:54 am
Edited on: June 27, 2011 10:31 am
 

Pepper: Is the trade deadline too soon?

By C. Trent Rosecrans


BASEBALL TODAY: Are the Nationals headed in the right direction with Davey Johnson? MLB.com's Tom Bororstein joins Lauren Shihadi to discuss the Nationals, as well as the upcoming Reds-Rays series, the Indians-Diamondbacks and more.

PUSH IT BACK: In a month, we here at Eye On Baseball will be churning out rumors and speculation left and right -- who has interest in whom, which team is a buyer and which is a seller and what backup second baseman has some trade value. It's part of the baseball calendar, the last weekend of July. But is that too early?

Tim Sullivan of the San Diego Union-Tribune says it is, and I'm not sure he's wrong.

The nonwaiver trade deadline is at the two-thirds mark of the season, and that may be too soon for teams to decide just exactly what their chances are to make the best decision about folding or going all in on a postseason run.

The best reason to change it is that it forces too many teams -- especially those without a high payroll flexibility -- to give up too soon. Who wants to pay to see 25 games or so to see a team that has given up hope? Push the trade deadline back and lie to us a little longer, we like that.

NEW YORK TRADE TIME?: Could this be the year the Mets and Yankees make a big trade with each other? The two teams have only made nine trades with each other in their history. It's unlikely Jose Reyes will go across town, but Francisco Rodriguez, Carlos Beltran, Jason Isringhausen and Tim Byrdak could help the Yankees. [Wall Street Journal]

STRETCHING PINEDA: While nobody gave it any consideration when Michael Pineda broke the Mariners' camp in the rotation, it's now going to become an issue -- will the Mariners allow the rookie starter to add innings to his arm if the Mariners stick in the American League West race?

Seattle manager Eric Wedge says the team has a plan, not just for Pineda but the team's other pitchers as well, to try to limit innings, but still have his starters ready for September. The biggest thing is not limiting innings, but his game-to-game pitch count, Wedge said. [Seattle Times]

BARNEY SAYS IT GETS BETTER: Cubs rookie Darwin Barney not only participated in the "It Gets Better" project aimed at gay teens, but also said he was "honored" to ask. A cool deal for both Barney and an ever better deal for the campaign started by Cubs fan Dan Savage. The Giants have also shot a spot for the project. [Chicago Tribune]

HARANG STILL OUT: Padres starter Aaron Harang is unlikely to return from a stress fracture in his right foot until after the All-Star break. Harang leads the Padres' staff with a 7-2 record and 3.71 ERA. He's been on the DL since June 13. [San Diego Union-Tribune]

SORIA BACK: Since being reinstated as the Royals' closer, Joakim Soria hasn't allowed a run in 10 games (12 innings). He's only allowed four hits and two walks while striking out 12 and notching six saves. [Kansas City Star]

WE'RE GOING STREAKING!: Who is the streakiest team in baseball? Beyondtheboxscore.com has done the math and it's the Boston Red Sox. The least streaky? Well, that would be the consistently bad Chicago Cubs. The Cubs, amazingly enough, haven't won three games in a row all season.

JENKS BACK SOON: Red Sox reliever Bobby Jenks is expected to join the team Monday in Philadelphia and could be activated on Tuesday. [Boston Herald]

Marlins STILL WOOING BIG NAMES: Nobody expects Jack McKeon to manager the Marlins next season. Florida hired its interim manager after last season and look at how that turned out. Apparently owner Jeffrey Loria wants a big-name manager, and that's likely Bobby Valentine or Ozzie Guillen. [Palm Beach Post]

BYRD'S FACEMASK: Bringing flashbacks of Terry Steinbach, Cubs outfielder Marlon Byrd will wear a helmet with extra protection in his rehab start at Triple-A Iowa. Byrd was hit in the face last month and suffered facial fractures. [Chicago Tribune]

FINDING NIMMO: The Mets made Brandon Nimmo the first-ever first-round draft pick from the state of Wyoming. Wyoming hasn't had a first-rounder before because of its combination of low population and harsh climate. Nimmo's dad, Ron, has helped on both causes, raising his sons there and building a barn where they could hone their baseball skills year-round. [New York Post]

CHANGEUP PITCHES: The Brewers want right-hander Yovani Gallardo to throw more changeups. Gallardo is 9-4 with a 3.92 ERA this season, but is throwing the changeup just 1.6 percent of the time and none in his last two starts. The Brewers believe the pitch could help him lower his pitch counts and go deeper into games. [MLB.com]

HANLEY TO STAY AT CLEANUP: The Marlins new regime is going to continue using shortstop Hanley Ramirez as the team's cleanup hitter. Ramirez was hitting .200/.298/.295 overall when he was put in the fourth spot by new manager Jack McKeon and in five games in that spot, he's hitting .400/.429/.450 with four RBI, raising his overall line to .218/.309/.309. [Palm Beach Post]

SMALL GESTURE, BIG DEAL: Phil Rogers of the Chicago Tribune writes a really neat tale of Curt Schilling and a World War II veteran who recently passed away.

ROSE BRINGS 'EM IN: There's apparently not a whole lot going on in the greater Bristol area of Virginia and Tennessee, because Pete Rose is bringing in the fans. No, not the Hit King, but Pete Rose Jr., manager of the Bristol White Sox of the short-season Class A Appalachian League. Still, it's cool Rose is chasing his dream. If there's one thing when you look at his career path, he may not have his father's talent, but he does have his drive. [Bristol Herald Courier]

THIS IS WRONG: That's it. Just wrong. [Yahoo!'s Big League Stew]

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Posted on: June 16, 2011 8:58 pm
Edited on: June 16, 2011 9:08 pm
 

Marlins haven't 'pondered' a managerial move

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria isn't thinking about changing managers… yet.

Marlins president David Samson spoke to Joe Capozzi of the Palm Beach Post about the team's struggles, but if I'm Rodriguez, the quotes aren't making me think about ditching the rental and buying real estate in South Florida.

The Marlins fired their hitting coach a week ago, so it's no surprise a reporter would be asking about Rodriguez's job status. Still, Samson didn't sound prepared to answer that particular question.

"It's not something that I have pondered with Jeffrey. I can't really say that… I can't really say, to be honest with you…" Samson said. "List, [general manager] Larry [Beinfest] and I are talking every day. Larry is talking with his baseball people to figure out what the best thing we can do, how we can get this turned around. Obviously, it got sour very quickly. I've never seen something turn as quickly, so we've got to figure out what, if anything, needs to be done."

The Marlins, with their loss on Thursday, have lost seven in a row and 15 of their last 16 (or 17 of their last 19, if you want to go back even a little further). Given the Marlins fired hitting coach John Mallee last week and Rodriguez only has a contract through the end of this year, it's understandable if he's feeling the heat. Add to those Loria's history of a quick trigger, it wouldn't be a shock of Rodriguez already has his office packed up ready to go at a moment's notice.

"I saw the firing of Mallee coming," Rodriguez told Clark Spencer of the Miami Herald. "I was more worried about Mallee than firing me. I think it would be a mistake [to fire me] because I don't think anything is going to change on the field. I'm grateful they gave me a chance to be here. What they do after this, whatever they want to do."

Last June Loria fired Fredi Gonzalez and named Rodriguez the interim manager. After flirting with several other managerial choices, most notably Bobby Valentine, Rodriguez was named the manager for the rest of the season and then given a contract for just the 2011 season. Many expect Loria to go after a big-name manager for 2012 when the Marlins move into their new stadium and perhaps make another run at Valentine.

Rodriguez at least has his best player behind him.

"I'm on his side," Hanley Ramirez told the Miami Herald. "Whatever he does, I'm good for it, because he's the best guy we've ever had here.

"Everything is bad right now. But he's there for you. I'll never complain about anything he does. He's a pretty good guy and a pretty good manager. He's smart."

Rodriguez is certainly smart enough to know his days as Marlins manager are numbered.

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Posted on: May 2, 2011 10:28 am
 

Pepper: Streaking Ethier, struggling arms

By Matt Snyder
 
Baseball Today: Can Andre Ethier extend his hitting streak to 28 games? Will Madison Bumgarner and Clay Buchholz get back on track tonight? Tom Boorstein of MLB.com joins Lauren Shehadi with the latest.


Padres PAYROLL TO RISE: The San Diego Padres have been one of the teams in the majors unable to re-up with stud veteran players in recent years (Adrian Gonzalez is the latest example, as he was traded with the writing on the wall in terms of an extension), but things may change slightly in the near future. With a new TV deal on the horizon, CEO Jeff Moorad said Sunday a new deal would have a "direct impact" on player salaries, increasing the payroll by as much as 20 percent. (Sign on San Diego )

ON OSWALT: Roy Oswalt is tending to his family in tornado-ravaged Mississippi and won't make it back for his previously scheduled start on Tuesday. Instead, he's likely to rejoin the team Thursday and start Saturday. (MLB.com ) In related matters, ESPN's Buster Olney noted Sunday night that he felt Oswalt -- among players with whom he's ever conversed -- is the most likely to leave baseball whenever he felt it necessary. I know a few years back Oswalt was a guy who had talked more than once about an early retirement. It's an interesting discussion in which there is no right answer, but he simply may be a guy who holds personal matters closer than his profession.

FICKLE FELIZ: Sunday, USA Today reported that Neftali Feliz said he wanted to close for the rest of his career -- and didn't want to deal with trying to stretch out as a starter. Later Sunday, however, he backtracked a bit, saying: "At the end of the year, we'll talk about it again." This shouldn't be a shock, as Feliz is young, emotional and has changed his mind on this specific issue before. (MLB.com )

SEND HIM A VALENTINE: Apparently Jose Reyes owes his ability to switch-hit with effectiveness to former manager Bobby Valentine. Reportedly, before Sunday night's game against the Phillies, Valentine told Mets manager Terry Collins, "in case anyone asks, I made him into a switch-hitter." It sounds a bit pompous on the surface, but it's evidently true, because Reyes backed him up. Sure, Reyes was already a switch-hitter, but he was awful from the left side until Valentine worked with him. “At that time it was still kind of new to me and I was struggling from the left side,” Reyes said. “I didn’t have any confidence, but Bobby helped me a lot. He really worked with me and it made a huge difference for me.” (New York Times )

A NEW CLUBHOUSE RECORD: Mets bullpen catcher Dave Racaniello devoured 14 cheesesteaks during the weekend series in Philadelphia, setting a record for the visitors' clubhouse. Not shockingly, the previous record-holder was the robust Dmitri Young. (ESPN New York )

VERNON'S PICKLE: I didn't catch the go-ahead run in the Angels-Rays game Sunday (I watch as much as I can, but you can only toggle so much effectively -- stuff is bound to get missed), but I repeatedly saw on Twitter and in my Google Reader how Vernon Wells was the hero for his savvy baserunning display. It's interesting, all he really did was get caught in a rundown. (MLB.com ) I've defended Wells in the past against home fans booing him, but this is a bit hard to understand. It would have been lazy and, frankly, stupid if he didn't avoid the initial tag. It's probably just a case of a guy struggling and local writers/fans just wanting to praise him for anything positive. And I won't blame anyone for that.

BIZARRO BUCS:
The Pirates have been maligned for the better part of the last 20 years for not holding any quality players through free agency, coughing most up via trade. Andrew McCutchen has the potential to be a superstar and there is talk he might get a long-term contract. In fact, he said, "I'm willing to be here for my whole career." (Post-Gazette ) He won't be eligible for free agency until 2016, but this is a nice movement to see. I'm no Pirates fan, but it's not good for the game as a whole if any clubs are unable to keep any quality players.

DAY OR NIGHT? "The Decider" in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch poses the question, would you rather attend a baseball game during the day or at night? There are bound to be different answers for different circumstances -- for example, he points out that in St. Louis, humidity during the day in the middle of the summer is just brutal -- so the answers will most certainly vary. For me, being a Cubs fan, I will always choose day over night. There's just something about the sun shining over a 1:20 game that cannot be duplicated at night.

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Posted on: April 18, 2011 3:15 pm
 

Mets minority owner could bring Valentine back

By Evan Brunell

While it's a long shot, Bobby Valentine's next managing job in MLB could be with his ex-team in the Mets.

SI.com's Jon Heyman notes that two of the final three candidates to become minority owners of the Mets in Steve Cohen and Anthony Scaramucci are major fans of Bobby Valentine and could angle to have him become the new skipper.

Of course, the Mets already have a new manager in Terry Collins, so that would represent an uphill climb. But if a change has to be made in the next few years, Heyman writes that a "vocal limited partner" could bring Valentine's name back and play and perhaps overcome owner Fred Wilpon's resistance in bringing back Valentine after firing him in 2002.

Valentine was asked about the possibility on Sunday night, to which he replied "Why would I want to do that? I have a great job.''

Still, it's widely believed Valentine will eventually manage a team in the next couple years.

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