Tag:Ian Kinsler
Posted on: September 29, 2011 1:31 pm
 

Players of the Month: Beltre, Fister

Fister, Beltre

By Evan Brunell

September brought a dazzling postseason race that culminated in perhaps baseball's greatest final day of the season. Interestingly enough, however, there were only two of a possible 12 nominees for September player of the month that had any involvement in the race to the wire. As far as individual performances went, September belonged to two teams who had the division title in hand much of the month.

September's Best
Expert Batter Pitcher
Knobler Cabrera Fister
Miller Beltre Fister
Brunell Napoli Fister
Rosecrans Longoria Carpenter
Snyder Beltre Fister
Fantasy Kinsler Fister

Texas had an incredible offensive explosion, with three separate players garnering votes. Adrian Beltre, who finished fifth in the AL with 32 home runs, eked out a victory over his teammates along with Miguel Cabrera and Evan Longoria. Beltre hit .374/.385/.778, driving 12 homers out of the park after missing all of August and part of July with injury. Imagine how many homers Beltre might have had if he stayed healthy.

Teammates Napoli and Kinsler also had months to remember, the second baseman swinging to the tune of .330/.421/.711, blasting 11 homers, just one behind Beltre. He also swiped eight bags, two more than any other month to finish with 30 stolen bases and give Kinsler a 30/30 season. Napoli blew Beltre and Kinsler out of the water statistically, although he played in in a handful of less games thanks to being a catcher and having people blocking him at DH and first base. But Napoli went bonkers for a .429/.518/.843 line.

Meanwhile, Evan Longoria put the Rays in the playoffs and Miguel Cabrera solidified the offense behind the pitcher of the month in Doug Fister. Acquired from the Mariners at the trade deadline, Fister blew away the competition in September and showed that he was for real. After coming up as nothing more than a back-of-the-rotation starter thanks to solid command but no true out pitch, he emerged with Detroit as a potential ace. Fister's 0.5 ERA in September paced the field, and he was a perfect 5-0, throwing 34 innings and allowing just 15 hits and three walks.

Past players of the month: April | May | June | July | August

Batter of the Month
Danny Knobler Scott Miller
CabreraMiguel Cabrera, Tigers
I read somewhere that Cabrera said Justin Verlander was the MVP. I'll go with that, but if there's an MVP for September, it's got to be Cabrera, who hit .429 and drove in 21 runs, with a 1.290 OPS. He hit, and the Tigers took off.
BeltreAdrian Beltre, Rangers
Not only did Beltre step off of the DL in the month of September and ease Texas' October concerns, he did it with incredible aplomb. Aside from playing his usual great third base, Beltre slugged 12 homers, collected 29 RBI and had an astounding 1.162 OPS. Thanks to his glove and his bat, the Rangers clinched home field advantage in the first round of the playoffs.
Evan Brunell C. Trent Rosecrans
NapoliMike Napoli, Rangers
Napoli struggled to break through with the Angels, then finally forced the Rangers' hand. And yet, he still goes unnoticed despite leading all batters in September in slugging percentage (.843), tied for first in average (.429) and second in OBP (.518). Only one word for this performance: Beast.
LongoriaEvan Longoria, Rays
Am I putting too much on Wednesday night's performance? Perhaps, but he still had an incredible month as the Rays rallied over the last month of the season from nine games behind the Red Sox when the month started. Longoria hit .289/.454/.589 over the last month with seven homers and 22 RBI, including two big homers in the biggest game of the year.
Matt Snyder Fantasy -- Scott White
 BeltreAdrian Beltre, Rangers
The Rangers have been under the radar this month because they were expected to win the West, didn't have a huge comeback and won last year. But two of the best players in baseball this past month came from Texas and they weren't named Michael Young. Ian Kinsler loses out by a nod here, as Beltre hit 12 homers, drove home 28 and had a .374/.385/.778 line.
KinslerIan Kinsler, Rangers
Kinsler's .330 batting average wasn't the highest for a batter in September, but that's the way his entire season has gone. The .255 hitter is so valuable in so many other ways that he's clearly among the cream of the crop, and never was it more evident than in September. He had 16 walks, 11 homers and eight steals, and the latter two propelled him to a 30-30 season.
Pitcher of the Month
Knobler Miller
FisterDoug Fister, Tigers
The Red Sox got Erik Bedard. The Tigers got Fister. The Red Sox are going home. The Tigers aren't. Fister was 5-0 in September, with a 0.53 ERA. Red Sox starters were 4-11 with a 7.08 ERA. Fister allowed just 18 base runners in 34 innings, with 34 strikeouts.
FisterDoug Fister, Tigers
I watched Fister pitch down the stretch after Detroit acquired him from Seattle at the July 31 trade deadline and I felt like I was watching Doyle Alexander in 1987. Fister is taller (6-8), but man, was he nails after the trade. He went 5-0 in September with 34 strikeouts and three walks. He compiled an 0.53 WHIP. As long as the Tigers didn't give Seattle a future John Smoltz (they didn't), this is the best trade any contender made.
Brunell Rosecrans
FisterDoug Fister, Tigers
What else can be said that my fine colleagues already hasn't? Fister's September was so awe-inspiring, no one blinks twice when his name gets slotted behind Verlander at No. 2. in the postseason rotation. This guy was a No. 4/5 starter last year. How quickly things change.
CarpenterChris Carpenter, Cardinals
Carpenter went 3-0 with a 2.15 ERA and 0.98 WHIP in six starts in September. He also had two shutouts, as well as a scoreless eight-inning appearance against the Phillies. Like Longoria, he had a pretty good night on Wednesday, allowing just two hits to the Astros in his shutout at Minute Maid Park. September's all about raising to the occasion, and that's what Carpenter did.
Snyder Fantasy -- White
FisterDoug Fister, Tigers
The Tigers' rotation isn't a one-man show. Justin Verlander is going to take home the Cy Young in a rightful landslide, but Fister gives them a solid No. 2. He was 5-0 with a 0.53 ERA and a 34/3 K/BB rate in 34 innings. Many pitchers had great months, but Fister's symbolized how great the Tigers' chances to reach the World Series have become.
 FisterDoug Fister, Tigers
It sounds like a joke, but it's not. Fister was the most valuable pitcher for Fantasy owners in September. Was Javier Vazquez slightly better? Yes. But the disparity between expectations and results for Fister was so high that he's now forever part of Fantasy lore. He managed to win more games (five) than he started (four) and allowed only 18 baserunners in 34 innings. He was an out-of-nowhere ace.

Danny Knobler and Scott Miller are Senior MLB Writers; Evan Brunell, C. Trent Rosecrans and Matt Snyder are Eye on Baseball Bloggers; Scott White is a Fantasy Writer.

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Posted on: September 17, 2011 1:54 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Aviles makes his first homer count

Mike Aviles

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Mike Aviles, Red Sox: Starting in place of the hobbled Kevin Youkilis, Avilies was nearly the goat when his sacrifice attempt in the second inning resulted in a double play. He made up for it in the fourth inning with his first homer in a Red Sox uniform, giving Boston a 4-3 lead -- one they'd hold on to for the big win against the surging Rays. Aviles had just three extra-base hits (all doubles) in 70 plate appearances since his trade from Kansas City on July 29 before hitting the game-winning homer.

Ryan Braun, Brewers: With two homers on Friday in Cincinnati, Braun became the second Brewer in franchise history to hit 30 homers and steal 30 bases in the same season. His 29th homer of the season came in the third inning off of Bronson Arroyo (more on that later) and he hit his 30th off of reliever Jeremy Horst in the eighth inning. He entered the game with 31 stolen bases. Tommy Harper hit 31 homers and stole 38 bases for the Brewers in 1970, the team's first season in Milwaukee.

Adron Chambers, Cardinals: In just his second career plate appearance, the Cardinals outfielder singled in the go-ahead run in the 11th inning to help lead the Cardinals to a 4-2 victory. Chambers had an excellent at-bat, fouling off three pitches before lining the ball into right off Phillies reliever Michael Schwimer


Bronson Arroyo, Reds: Prince Fielder's solo shot in the second inning was the 41st homer given up by the Reds starter this season, a new franchise record. The old record was set by left-hander Eric Milton in 2005. But the record wouldn't stay at 41 long, Mark Kotsay and Ryan Braun went back-to-back in the third and George Kottaras homered in the seventh to increase Arroyo's total to 44. Arroyo easily leads the majors in homers allowed this season -- the Rangers' Colby Lewis is second with 33 and Houston's Brett Myers has allowed 31. Only four pitchers in history have allowed more than Arroyo's 44 homers, Bert Blyleven (50, 1986), Jose Lima (48, 2000), Blyleven (46, 1987), Robin Roberts (46, 1956).  Jamie Moyer also allowed 44 in 2004. With two more possible starts, Arroyo could challenge Blyleven's record. Interestingly enough, he's allowed the same number of walks as homers this season. The only pitcher in history to allow more homers than walks (with more than 40 walks) was Roberts in 1956 when he walked just 40 batters.

Derek Lowe, Braves: With Jair Jurrjens unavailable for the first round of the playoffs and Tommy Hanson questionable, if the Braves hang on to win the wild card, they'll need Derek Lowe in the NLDS. Lowe's hardly inspiring confidence right now, allowing six runs on nine hits in just 2 1/3 innings against the same Mets team that had their manager bash them the day before. Lowe, 38, is 0-3 with a 10.15 ERA in August. Rookie Julio Teheran gave up four runs on four hits in 2 2/3 innings after relieving Lowe.

Ian Kinsler, Rangers: With two outs and two on in the third, the Rangers second baseman charged a chopper by Dustin Ackley and tried to get rid of the ball quickly to end the inning, but his throw from about 40 feet went well wide of first, allowing the Mariners' first run of the game to score. Pitcher C.J. Wilson didn't help himself, either when his wild pitch allowed another run to score. The Rangers then got a bad break when Mike Carp hit a ball off the bag at second to score yet another run in the three-run third. All three runs in the inning were unearned, and Wilson needed 41 pitches to get through the inning -- 18 following Kinsler's error. Kinsler did record one of the four hits the Rangers managed off of starter Blake Beavans.

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Posted on: August 21, 2011 12:11 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Kinsler, Uggla belt two HR

Kinsler

By Evan Brunell

3 UpIan Kinsler, Rangers: Ian Kinsler could do no wrong Saturday, although it wasn't enough to defeat the White Sox, by rapping out three hits in four trips to the plate, adding two runs and RBI apiece. But it only gets better -- two of Kinsler's hits went over the fence, giving him 20 homers on the season. The second baseman hasn't fulfilled high expectations set in the 2008-09 seasons, and is currently on pace to post the worst offensive season of his career. Don't tell that to John Danks, though, who coughed up both homers.

Jeremy Hellickson, Rays: The Rays have received fantastic starting pitching as of late, and Hellickson kept the ball rolling by blanking the Mariners in eight innings, giving up one free pass and six hits, punching out five. The outing lowered Hellickson's ERA to 3.04, which is fantastic for any pitcher, never mind one in his first full season. Hellickson is increasingly looking like the favorite to snag the Rookie of the Year award, and no one else is mounting a major challenge -- at least, not yet.

Dan Uggla, Braves: Uggla's hitting streak may be over, but he's still crushing pitchers, rocketing two home runs Saturday against Arizona. Uggla finished the night with a 2-for-3 effort, driving in three runs, scoring twice and tacking on a walk. Not including Saturday's outburst, since July 2, Uggla has hit .327/.393/.648. You can now tick these numbers up slightly more. It's been an incredible resurgence for Uggla, whose season numbers still pale in comparison to the past, but it's now no longer a lost season, as it was shaping up to be.



3 DownFrancisco Rodriguez, Brewers: In K-Rod's return to the Mets, he allowed New York to cap off what was a stunning comeback by giving up three runs in the bottom of the eighth inning, including Angel Pagan's two-run home run to push the Mets ahead. Milwaukee actually ended up coming back to win the game in the top ninth thanks to Rodriguez's replacement in the Big Apple, Jason Isringhausen, blowing the lead. Before that, though, the Mets needed to push five runs across the plate in the seventh just to pull within one, and kept the good times going against Rodriguez, who was making his first appearance at Citi Field since being traded immediately after the All-Star Game ended. Since Rodriguez arrived in town, the Brewers bullpen has been fantastic, but they just didn't show up for work Saturday.

Tim Wakefield, Red Sox: And the saga continues. Wakefield made his fifth attempt at gaining 200 victories but fell short on Saturday when he was removed from the game in the middle of the sixth inning and the Royals threatening. Matt Albers relieved and offered up a walk and a single to plate Mike Moustakas with the tying run in a bang-bang play at the plate before the Royals poured on the runs against the bullpen. Wakefield walks away with four earned runs in 5 1/3 innings, allowing nine hits while striking out three and walking zero. The knuckleballer didn't exactly knock them dead Saturday, but has pitched rather well over the last five starts and deserves to have that win in hand by now.

A.J. Burnett, Yankees:  Burnett didn't exactly endear himself to Yankees brass with his start on Saturday. Already struggling through a lousy year, Burnett allowed seven runs to cross the plate in just 1 1/3 innings, walking three, whiffing one and spiking his ERA to 4.96. When skipper Joe Girardi came to yank Burnett from the game, the right-hander had some choice words for Girardi. He may want to have some choice words for himself, as he now checks in with a 6.98 ERA in nine starts over 49 innings.

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Posted on: April 4, 2011 9:24 pm
Edited on: April 5, 2011 1:04 am
 

Cruz makes history with fourth home run

By Matt Snyder

Nelson Cruz of the Rangers hit a home run against the Mariners Monday night in Texas. It was his fourth home run of the season, one comnig in each of the Rangers' four games thus far in 2011. Only Willie Mays (1971) and Mark McGwire (1998) have previously accomplished the feat. Ian Kinsler and Mark Teixeira entered Monday night with a home run in each of their team's first three games , but neither was able to join Cruz in the history-making feat.

Monday night, he drove an Erik Bedard pitch 419 feet in the bottom of the fourth inning.

"In that at-bat I was thinking, hit the ball through the hole (at) second base hard, because he was throwing that curveball," Cruz said "I was hoping he would throw that so I could hit it the other way, but he threw me a changeup and I turned on it."

Interestingly, each of Cruz's four home runs have been solo shots. He ended the game -- a 6-4 Rangers win -- 2-3 and is hitting .429 thus far. The Rangers, last season's AL champs, have jumped out to a 4-0 start.

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Posted on: April 4, 2011 11:16 am
Edited on: April 4, 2011 12:01 pm
 

Three with shot at history

Ian KinslerBy C. Trent Rosecrans

There are only six games on tonight's baseball slate, but that doesn't mean there aren't high stakes.

Two games will feature a total of three players looking to tie an MLB record. Nelson Cruz, Ian Kinsler and Mark Teixeira have all homered in each of their first three games of the season, becoming three of 26 players to achieve the feat. Only two men -- Mark McGwire in 1998 and Willie Mays in 1971 -- homered in each of the first four games of the season.

Teixeira and the Yankees host the Twins at 7:05 p.m. EST. Scott Baker is on the mound and that's good news for Teixeira, who has hit .462/.462/.769 in 13 plate appearances against the right-hander Baker. Teixeira has one homer and a double off of Baker.

Kinsler and Cruz are the first pair of teammates to notch homers in the first three games of the season and will be facing the Mariners' Erik Bedard at 8:05 p.m. EST at the Ballpark in Arlington.

Kinsler hasn't hit a homer off of Bedard in 20 career plate appearances, but does have a double and is hitting .350/.350/.400 against the lefty Bedard. Cruz has a homer and a double in eight plate appearances against Bedard, with a .375/.375/.875 slash line.

Bedard is making his first start in nearly two years. He hasn't pitched since July 25, 2009, missing all of last season with a shoulder injury.

H/T to Baseball Reference blog.

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Posted on: April 3, 2011 11:16 pm
Edited on: April 3, 2011 11:17 pm
 

3 up, 3 down for 4/3: Teixeira's hot start

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Mark Teixeira3UP

Mark Teixeira, Yankees -- Mark Teixeira is a notorious slow starter, but as CBSSports.com senior writer Scott Miller found out this spring, the Yankees first baseman overhauled his offseason routine and started hitting sooner. It appears it worked -- he homered for the third straight game on Sunday, joing Dave Winfield as just the second Yankee to homer in the first three games of the season. Speaking of homers in each of the first three games of the season, Texas' Nelson Cruz and Ian Kinsler became the first set of teammates to do that.

Jaime Garcia, Cardinals -- There were plenty of people worried about Garcia following a shaky spring. Well, once the games started to count, Garcia was back to his 2010 form. Garcia allowed just four hits in his shutout on Sunday, walking two and striking out a career-high nine against the Padres.

Reds catchers -- You saw what Ramon Hernandez did on opening day, well, he hasn't played since and it hasn't hurt the Reds. Between Hernandez and Ryan Hanigan, Reds catchers are 9 for 12 with three home runs and seven RBI after Hanigan went 4 for 4 with a pair of homers on Sunday's 12-3 victory over Milwaukee.

3DOWN

MLB schedule makers -- Weather was a constant concern this opening weekend, but only one game was called because of the weather, Sunday's Rockies-Diamondbacks game. How difficult is it to look at the schedules and figure out that you've got a better chance of bad weather in Denver in early April than in Arizona? Ozzie Guillen was right, it's "very stupid."

Brian Broderick, Nationals -- In his major-league debut, the Rule 5 pick not only allowed four runs on two hits and a walk in two-thirds of an inning, he also balked in a run when his cleat got caught in the rubber and didn't throw the ball. "I was either going to throw it way over the catcher's head or not throw it at all," Broderick told MASNSports.com.

Angels bullpen -- For the third day in a  row, the Angels' bullpen gave up the lead and took the loss against the Royals. In 16 innings in four games, Angels relievers have allowed 19 hits, 12 runs (nine earned) five homers, 13 walks and 14 strikeouts. Closer Fernando Rodney walked three Royals before allowing a two-out double to Wilson Betimit to tie the game in the ninth on Sunday. Rodney has now walked four of the nine batters he's faced in 2011.

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Posted on: February 27, 2011 12:01 pm
Edited on: February 27, 2011 12:13 pm
 

Pepper: Werth hates the Phillies

Werth
By Evan Brunell

HATE IS A STRONG WORD: How quickly Jayson Werth forgets.

"I hate the Phillies too," Werth said in response to GM Mike Rizzo's complaining about how Philadelphia has thrown purpose pitches and executed dirty plays against the Nationals in recent years.

Werth, in his new role with the Nationals as a $126-million man will be to bring an edge to the club, something club officials felt was lacking. In fact, prior to Werth's arrival, Ian Desmond was considered as the closest to a vocal leader as the team had. Oh, and Desmond was a rookie. But now, Werth will be looked at to assume the mantle and give the Nats a harder edge as they march toward respectability.

No mention of Werth would be complete without acknowledging the stupidity of the outrageous contract handed Werth. But while that contract will come back to burn the Nats one day, at least for the next three to four years, Washington will love his middle-of-the-order bat along with his leadership. (Washington Post)

STICK A NEEDLE IN ME: Jason Hammel has turned to alternative medicine to manage his high cholesterol. A hereditary condition, high cholesterol was responsible for his father's death via heart attack at age 47, and the Rockies pitcher has no interest in following in his father's footsteps in regards to a demise. However, Hammel's treatment via Chestor caused side effects of soreness, which Hammel believes was responsible for his poor finish to the season. Now, he's turned to acupuncture and herbal treatments. (MLB.com)

LEARNING EXPERIENCE: Don Mattingly enters his first season as a major league manager, but has already learned some important lessons. Namely, walking off the mound after a coaching visit and then turning around to answer a question counts as two trips to the mound. That gaffe, put on display last season, is not one Mattingly plans to make again. (San Jose Mercury News)

NEW-LOOK Rangers: It's early yet, but manager Ron Washington has already settled on his lineup. Ian Kinsler will lead off, followed by Elvis Andrus. It's a rather curious move, as Kinsler is more power-oriented while Andrus gets on at a good clip and steals bases. Michael Young will bat sixth to try to increase his RBI opportunities. That leads one to wonder: a baseball move, or an appease-Young move? (Ft. Worth Star-Telegram)

KROONING FOR 200: Marc Kroon is back stateside. The former longtime minor league reliever found success in Japan and nailed down 177 saves in a six-year span. However, Kroon found offers lacking this past season and thus has returned stateside, joining San Francisco in an attempt to make the bullpen. Some believe Kroon is being blackballed by Japan so he will not receive 200 saves, an important landmark in Japanese baseball. Given the league's treatment of foreigners when chasing Japanese baseball records, that comes as no surprise. Kroon still harbors hope he can go back. (San Francisco Chronicle)

ONE STEP AT A TIME: Matt Bush was out of baseball from 2008-09 and was a former failed first-round pick of the Padres with behavioral issues. Now, the ex-shortstop has turned heads since becoming a pitcher and has rocketed up the Rays' depth chart. Bush is still a ways away, but this is one potential feel-good story worth monitoring. (Tampa Tribune)

BOSTON'S WHERE THE STATS ARE AT: The statistical revolution isn't just flooding baseball, it's flooding sports in general. And Boston is where it's all happening, as many consider it the "Silicon Valley of sports analytics." A sports analytics conference is taking place in Boston this upcoming weekend, and the Boston Globe takes a look at how analytics have influenced sports growing out of Boston. (Boston Globe)

IT'S NOT JUST ABOUT BASEBALL: Rays skipper Joe Maddon has a lot on his plate this spring, trying to assemble a new-look Rays team to compete in the AL East. At the same time, he's attempting to make Hispanics welcomed in his hometown of Hazleton, Pa. Residents are resisting the Hispanic influx, which Maddon fears could be the demise of a city with residents long in the tooth. (St. Petersburg Times)

ON SECOND THOUGHT, IT'S JUST BASEBALL: A nice interview with Bill James, who helped usher in the statistical revolution in baseball. There's likely no sports analytics conference in Boston without this talent, but while baseball may constantly be on James' mind, he likes other stuff too. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

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Posted on: December 1, 2010 6:14 pm
Edited on: December 1, 2010 6:52 pm
 

Kinsler lobbying Lee to return to Rangers

Well, it's been out there. I'm bored a bit with "visits" and he-said, he-said reports, but this one is at least kind of interesting -- and it's Cliff Lee.

So, Ian Kinsler was on a radio show in the Dallas area and said he'd traded texts with Lee (via the Dallas Morning News ):
"Basically, I said, 'What's going on in Arkansas?' He said, 'the Rangers are down here again,'" Kinsler said on KESN-FM. "I was like, 'Well, just sign whatever they give you.' He said, 'Let's see what happens. We have to wait it out.'

"I said, 'Remember, I like being your teammate.' And he said, 'I do, too, but we have to wait it out.' I said, 'Just sign it.' And then he sent me a picture of a deer (that one of Lee's friends bagged)."
What does this mean in the long run? Well, Lee knows he's going to be much richer pretty soon, but isn't in a hurry to find out just how rich. And we knew that already.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com