Tag:Ivan Nova
Posted on: May 12, 2011 11:57 pm
 

3 up, 3 down: Carlos Beltran launches Mets to win

Beltran

By Evan Brunell


upCarlos Beltran, Mets -- Well, Beltran certainly announced himself with authority, blasting three home runs including a stifling top-of-the-ninth inning shot to quell any shot the Rockies thought they had of a comeback as they had made noise each of the two innings previous. Beltran ended the day with three runs scored (duh) and six RBI, propelling the Mets to a 9-5 victory. Proving he's over his knee issues, Beltran now has eight homers on the year and a .295/.387/.590 line. Despite a hefty price tag and balky knees, it really does look like New York may be able to not only trade the right fielder, but extract some value in return.

Zach Britton, Orioles
-- Man, this guy is just killing it and seems like a lock for the Rookie of the Year award already. Britton drove his ERA down to 2.42 by handcuffing the Mariners through nine, giving up just three hits, walking none and punching out five. Opponent Jason Vargas had a similar line, going nine with seven hits, one walk and four whiffs. Neither gave up a run, and this game went all the way into the 12th before Brandon League choked away a one-run lead by going like this: single-HBP-HBP-line out-single by J.J. Hardy. Despite the 12 innings, the game was played in a tidy 2:52. In other words, the end of the sixth inning of any of the Red Sox-Yankees game this weekend.

Yankees offense
-- The end result was a loss, but the Yankees avoided striking out just once but Sean O'Sullivan was able to limit New York to four runs in 6 2/3 innings, adding two walks. You won't see a pitcher or offense lose too many games while avoiding going down by K. O'Sullivan has a respectable 3.79 ERA but it feels like the wheels should fall off anytime. But back to the Yankees -- it's the fourth time this season a team has avoided striking out, and the second time the team in question lost. (And yet, the losing team of the White Sox scored the most runs of all with seven -- go figure.) On a year-to-year basis, this happens roughly 10-20 times, so this won't be the last non-strikeout game we see in 2011. 

downIvan Nova, Yankees -- Shows you what I know, right? Earlier Wednesday, the On Deck item suggested that Nova, who had impressed so far in the early going, should easily handle the Royals because Sean O'Sullivan was due for a regression. Uh, not so much. (Well, as detailed in the '3 up' section, O'Sullivan kinda got away with it.) Nova was blasted by the Royals and four Royals had 2 RBI apiece. The right-hander only got through 3 innings and three batters in the fourth before giving way to  31-year-old Cuban Amaury Sanit, who made his big-league debut with 4 2/3 innings of three-run ball and will certainly be farmed out. Nova coughed up an eye-popping 10 hits, giving up just four earned runs but eight total thanks to two errors and slogged through 73 pitches, walking two and whiffing none. K.C. was keyed into Nova right from the start; not much to do but hope the rookie can shake it off and move on.

Ian Desmond and Jayson Werth, Nationals -- The Nats held tough for 11 innings before caving into a Brian McCann single to end the game, and it's tough to wonder what might have been if Ian Desmond and Jayson Werth, the Nos. 2 and 3 hitters, respectively, had even attempted to make contact with the ball. OK, that's not fair -- they each did, once... but also struck out four times apiece. That's over half of the total strikeouts by Braves pitches, by the way. Werth has shown signs of snapping out of his slump recently, but this was a backbreaking slide back for him, while Desmond still hasn't figured things out at the plate.

Casey Coleman, Cubs -- Yuck. Coleman dished out six earned runs on nine hits in 4 1/3 innings, allowing four free passes and zero swings and misses for a third strike. That spikes his ERA to 7.22 and it's clear Coleman needs plenty more seasoning in the minors. Problem: the Cubs have no one else to pitch. Literally. While Doug Davis is making his debut on Saturday, that only pushed James Russell out of the rotation and sadly, Coleman and his 7.22 ERA are the best option to round out the starting five until Randy Wells comes back. That can't come fast enough.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: May 12, 2011 6:26 pm
Edited on: May 12, 2011 7:08 pm
 

On Deck: Britton aims to keep flying high

Britton
OD

By Evan Brunell


There are only four night games on Thursday so the pickings are slim... that said, there are still plenty of interesting storylines.

YOUNG BIRD FLYING HIGH: It sounds strange to say, but the Orioles are not that far below .500. Rookie Zach Britton will aim to inch them two games closer to the benchmark when he takes on the Mariners and Jason Vargas. Vargas for his part has found a niche in Seattle and somehow has fared better on the road thus far, so could take down Britton. In a battle of lefties, Britton has so far been the more impressive pitcher with a 5-2 record and 2.93 ERA. He's assured himself of sticking in the rotation upon Brian Matsuz's rotation, so unless he is demoted at some point in the next few years, will hit free agency after 2016. Mariners at Orioles, 7:05 p.m. ET

K.C. SURPRISING:
I knew the Royals were playing well, but did a bit of a double-take upon really noticing that their record is 19-17. I mean, really? They'll attempt to keep the good times rolling against New York, who will offer up Ivan Nova and his 4.08 ERA. Nova's performed better than many expected, but is he pitching over his head? Answer: probably. Sean O'Sullivan certainly is with his 3.41 ERA and is due for a crash back to reality, so New York should walk away with this one although at this point, you just never know. Royals at Yankees, 7:05 p.m. ET

BATTLE FOR .500
: It seems like lately all that's been talked about here On Deck is teams fighting to reach or stay above .500. That's because 11 teams are within three games of .500. The Nationals are right smack at .500 and would love to inch one game closer to third place, which the Braves currently hold with a 20-18 record. Washington will have to get past Derek Lowe, whose 3.22 ERA is putting him in shape to be the best starting pitcher on the trade market this summer as Atlanta searches for a hitter. The Nats will offer up Jordan Zimmermann and his 4.10 ERA as he continues to move past his Tommy John surgery and is poised to pair with Stephen Strasburg for an exciting tandem next season. Nationals at Braves, 7:10 p.m. ET

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: March 26, 2011 11:01 am
Edited on: April 18, 2011 12:33 pm
 

Barmes out 4-6 weeks with broken hand

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Clint BarmesAstros shortstop Clint Barmes will miss anywhere from four to six weeks with a  broken left hand, the Houston Chronicle reports.

Barmes was hit by a pitch from Yankees starter Ivan Nova on Friday and had X-rays that confirmed the non-displaced fracture in the fifth metacarpal bone in his left hand.

Barmes suffered a similar injury in 2002 at Double-A.

The Astros expected Barmes to start at shortstop after acquiring him in November for Felipe Paulino. The team's top backup, Jeff Keppinger, is currently sidelined following toe surgery. The Astros have their shortstop spot open, along with two backup infielder slots. The candidates are Angel Sanchez, Anderson Hernandez, Matt Downs and Oswaldo Navarro.

Barmes was hitting .196/.308/.286 this spring in 56 at-bats.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed. 

Posted on: March 16, 2011 11:15 pm
Edited on: March 17, 2011 12:01 am
 

3 up, 3 down for 3/16: Super Nova

Ivan Nova

By C. Trent Rosecrans

3 UP

1. Ivan Nova, Yankees -- The right-hander competing for a spot in the Yankees' rotation showed he could handle AL East competition on Wednesday, dominating the Orioles. Nova didn't allow a hit in six innings, and just two O's reached base. Nova hit Robert Andino to lead off the game and Adam Jones reached on an error in the fourth inning. Nova faced 19 batters, one over the minimum, throwing 59 pitches, 41 for strikes.

2. Elliot Johnson, Rays -- Competing for a spot on the Rays' bench, Johnson -- who has mostly played at second base -- made his spring debut in center field, and made quite the impression. Johnson stole three bases -- including a steal of home in the sixth inning, also had a double and as ingle, two runs and two RBI.

3. Joe Mauer, Twins -- Twins catcher Joe Mauer made his spring debut on Wednesday and singled on the second pitch he saw. Mauer served as the team's designated hitter and is expected to catch on Thursday in a minor league game.

3 DOWN

1. Tyler Clippard, Nationals -- The reliever coughed up his team's four-run lead by walking the first two batters he faced, then giving up two doubles, a triple and an RBI single to score the winning run.

2. J.J. Putz, Diamondbacks -- Another reliever, another disaster. Putz faced five batters and didn't retire one. He did, however, get credit for 1/3 of an inning because Erick Aybar was caught stealing. He walked three, gave up two hits and four runs. He also added a wild pitch to boot. But hey, he was throwing 92-94 mph, so there's that.

3. Daniel Schlereth, Tigers -- Well, while we're at it, why not make it a trilogy? Lefty Daniel Schlereth faced four batters Wednesday against the Cardinals and walked all four of them. Coming into Wednesday's game, he'd walked just one batter and hadn't allowed a run in 2 1/3 innings.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed. 
More MLB coverage

Posted on: March 6, 2011 10:09 am
Edited on: March 6, 2011 11:35 am
 

Pepper: Phillie concern

Domonic Brown

By C. Trent Rosecrans

After nothing but (deserved) rave reviews this offseason, reality is hitting the Philadelphia Phillies.

Still the favorite in the National League East, the same problem that kept them in a division race last season is popping up again -- injuries.

Chase Utley is already getting cortisone shots and, as our own Danny Knobler wrote it perfectly, if the Phillies are concerned -- and they're saying they're concerned -- it's not a good sign.

And now Domonic Brown is out with a broken hamate bone in his hand. Although Brown was struggling this spring -- hitless in 15 at-bats -- and was likely headed to Triple-A, he was still part of the team's plans for 2011.

The hamate injury is a tricky one -- he'll likely be able to play this season, but he won't be the same. Last year when I was around the Reds a bit, I talked to two players who were in different stages of the same injury. One, Yonder Alonso, suffered the injury in 2009, the other, Chris Dickerson, had the surgery during last season.

Dickerson was able to return and even played with the Reds and Brewers after the surgery. Alonso had the surgery in June of 2009 and was back that season, as well. However, the injury saps power. Alonso told me several times that the ball just didn't jump off his bat the same, what would be a double in the past wasn't getting past outfielders, and what was a homer in the past just died in the outfield. As doctors told him, about a year fate the surgery, his power was back. 

Brown can return this season, but don't expect him to be the same player he has shown to be in the minor leagues and that he'll be in the future.

The Phillies are counting on Ben Francisco and Ross Gload to fill in for Jayson Werth until Brown is ready. Now they'll be counting on those two longer.

Pitching won't be a problem for Philadelphia, and it wasn't the problem last year. When the team got in trouble, it was injuries and offense. With uncertainly to the health of Utley and then general uncertainty with Jimmy Rollins, there's cause for concern in Philly.

That said, they're still the favorites, but maybe not quite the prohibitive favorites they were before.

STAYING PAT: The Yankees appear to be happy with the starters they have in camp -- CC Sabathia, Phil Hughes, A.J. Burnett, Bartolo Colon, Freddy Garcia, Sergio Mitre and Ivan Nova.

Brian Cashman tells the Boston Globe the team is unlikely to trade for a starter before opening day.

"Can't rule it out, but it's highly unlikely," Cashman said. "Normally anything of quality doesn't become available until after the June draft. That's why you try and get as much as you can get accomplished in winter."

HOT DOG RUN: Apparently because the team mom forgot the orange slices, after his stint in Saturday's game, Boston's Dustin Pedroia ducked out of the Red Sox clubhouse to the concession stand for three hot dogs.

"They probably didn't think he was a player," Red Sox manager Terry Francona told reporters, including the Providence Journal. "Did you see that outfit he had on? He looks like he's going into second grade."

NATS OPTIMISM: A scout tells Sports Illustrated's Jon Heyman (via Twitter) that Nationals right-hander Jordan Zimmermann is "back." He's throwing 94-95 mph with a "superb" slider. Said the scout, "if they had [Stephen] Strasburg, they'd be dangerous."

The Nats don't, but Zimmermann offers hope for 2012, as he had Tommy John surgery in August of 2009, a year before Strasburg. 

AMBASSADOR GRIFFEY: Ken Griffey Jr.'s new job with the Mariners is to be an ambassador of sort, but before he does that, he served the same role for the U.S. State Department in the Philippines. 

Griffey just returned from working with coaches and youth players in the Philippines. 

USA Today's Paul White caught up with him last week before his trip. Griffey still refuses to talk about his exit from the game, but he'll likely be seen around the Mariners some this season. His new job requires about a month's worth of work with the team, doing a little bit of everything.

More importantly, he's being a dad. His daughter Taryn recently led Orlando's Dr. Phillips High School to the Florida girls basketball championship. Taryn Griffey, a freshman point guard, had 21 points in the championship game.

His son, Trey, is a junior safety and wide receiver who is being recruited, as well.

PIAZZA NOT BUYING Mets: Mike Piazza tells the New York Post he's interested in buying part of a baseball team "someday" but not now.

"I think everything is timing," Piazza said. "It's an interesting time in the game. There's a lot of change going on … but as far as anything on the forefront, there's nothing. Let's just say I talked to some people that are interested in getting into the game … It doesn't cost anything to talk. At least not yet."

NO PANIC FOR Braves: Atlanta's 23-year-old Craig Kimbrel has the inside track to replace Billy Wagner as the Braves' closer, but he's not been very good so far this spring. He's struggled with his command and has allowed four runs and six hits in three appearances this spring.

"If there is a trend like this later in the spring, then you start worrying about it," manager Fredi Gonzalez tells MLB.com. "But not right now."

CAIN FEELS BETTER: Giants pitcher Matt Cain played catch for about eight minutes on Saturday and felt no pain in his right elbow.

Cain was scratched from his last start and won't make his scheduled start on Tuesday, either. (MLB.com)

PIONEER LAID TO REST: About 500 people reportedly attended the funeral of Wally Yonamine in Hawaii on Saturday, according to Sanspo (via YakyuBaka.com). A memorial service will also be held in Tokyo later this month.

Yonamine, the first American to play professional baseball in Japan, died earlier this week at 85. The New York Times had a good obituary earlier this week, and a column in the Honolulu Star Advertiser shed light on how Yonamine dealt with death threats and other pressures when he started playing in Japan.

However, Yonamine became a star in Japan and was elected to the Japan Baseball Hall of Fame in 1994. He was also the first Asian-American to play in the NFL.

NOT THAT IT'S GONNA HAPPEN: But contraction isn't going to happen.

Union chief Michael Weiner tells the St. Petersburg Times that the union will fight any attempt to contract teams.

"Having been in bargaining in baseball since the late 80s, anything is fathomable, so we don't either take anything for granted or rule anything out," Weiner said. "All I would says is if that changes, if contraction becomes a goal of the owners in this negotiation, the tenor of the talks would change quickly and dramatically."

Bud Selig tells the Los Angeles Times it's not a goal for the owners, and it's certainly not a fight they want to take up.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
More MLB coverage
Posted on: February 24, 2011 4:52 pm
 

Garcia 'favorite' for Yankees' No. 4

The Yankees have an obvious top three in their starting pitching rotation in CC Sabathia, Phil Hughes and A.J. Burnett. We know that. Behind those three, however, things get a bit murky. There's a handful of relatively uninspiring candidates vying for the last two spots -- including names like Bartolo Colon, Freddy Garcia, Ivan Nova and Sergio Mitre.

Garcia does appear to be separating himself from the group, though, and he is the favorite for the fourth spot, according to SI.com 's Jon Heyman.

Garcia, 35, was a two-time All-Star early in his career for Seattle and then a solid starter for the White Sox for two years. In fact, he was part of the historic chain of World Series shutouts for the South Siders in 2005, throwing seven shutout innings and garnering the win in series-clinching Game 4.

He was in danger of falling out of the league for good at several points throughout the 2007-2009 seasons, but caught on with the White Sox again. He started 37 games for the Sox over the past two seasons, going 15-10 with a 4.56 ERA and 1.33 WHIP.

If Garcia does lock down the fourth spot, the Yankees' question marks in the staff hardly disappear. There's still that five spot, not to mention the questions that come with Hughes and Burnett.

The 24-year-old Hughes was an All-Star last season, but faltered down the stretch. After starting 10-1 with a 3.17 ERA,  Hughes went 8-7 with a 5.07 ERA the rest of the way. That could be due to normal fatigue for a youngster or teams' advanced scouting catching up to Hughes' stuff.

Burnett was flat awful for most of last season. He ended with a career worst 5.26 ERA and a dreadful 1.51 WHIP. His record was 10-15, and this for a team that won 95 games. There's no question Burnett has talent, and at age 34 he should still have some gas left in the tank. He just needs to get back on track.

As for the fifth spot in the rotation, Heyman reports it's "anyone's guess."

-- Matt Snyder

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: February 3, 2011 1:11 pm
Edited on: February 3, 2011 6:51 pm
 

What's next for Yankees' rotation?

With Andy Pettitte choosing retirement, the Yankees now go toward 2011 in the position they didn't want to face -- with an incomplete rotation.

CC Sabathia still leads the rotation, with Phil Hughes and A.J. Burnett behind him. After that? Well, it's up in the air. The internal candidates are Ivan Nova and Sergio Mitre. The team has added Bartolo Colon and Freddy Garcia to minor-league contracts and there are reports they're still interested in Kevin Millwood.

Here's a look at the 2010 seasons from those hoping to fill Pettitte's shoes:
Nova: 1-2, 4.50 ERA, 10 games, 7 starts, 42 IP, 44 H, 22 R, 21 ER, 17 BB, 26 K
Mitre: 0-3, 3.33 ERA, 27 games, 3 starts, 54 IP, 43 H, 23 R, 20 ER, 16 BB, 29 K
Garcia: 12-6, 4.64 ER, 28 games, 28  starts, 157 IP, 171 H, 85 R, 81 ER, 45 BB, 89 K
Colon: (2009) 3-6, 4.19 ERA, 12 games, 12 starts, 62 1/3 IP, 69 H, 42 R, 29 ER, 21 BB, 38 K
Millwood: 4-16, 5.10 ERA, 31 games, 31 starts, 190 2/3 IP, 223 H, 116 R, 108 ER, 65 BB, 132 K

That's not quite the Sabathia-Cliff Lee-Hughes-Pettitte-Burnett rotation the Yankees had dreamed off when their 2010 season was ended by the Rangers. But it also doesn't end the Yankees' playoff hopes, either. Sabathia and Hughes are certainly good enough to get the job done at the top of the rotation, even if Burnett is a wild card. The Yankees also have a good enough farm system now that they can go out and get a starter at the trade deadline.

No, the Yankees aren't as good as they would be with Pettitte, but it's hardly time for 29 other teams to celebrate the death of baseball in the Bronx.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.


Posted on: January 11, 2011 1:55 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 11:25 am
 

Bumgarner among those on Verducci Effect list

Madison Bumgarner Sports Illustrated 's Tom Verducci has come out with his Verducci Effect watch list for 2011 , led by San Francisco left-hander Madison Bumgarner.

The Verducci Effect states pitchers 25 and younger shouldn't increase their workload more than 30 innings from one year to the next. (In fairness to Verducci, he originally called it the "Year After Effect" because the year after the jump in innings there was a regression or injury).

Last year the 10 on the watch list finished with four pitchers who were hurt or regressed, two we about the same and four -- Mat Latos, Felix Hernandez, Josh Johnson and Max Scherzer had breakout years. Verducci notes it was "as strong a showing against the Verducci Effect since I started tracking it."

The 10 on his list for 2011, followed by their age and innings increase in 2010:
Madison Bumgarner, 21, 73
Alex Sanabia, 22, 66 1/3
Mat Latos, 23, 61 2/3
David Price, 25, 58 2/3
Brandon Beachy, 24, 57
Phil Hughes, 24, 46
Brett Cecil, 24, 41 1/3
Gio Gonzalez, 25, 41
Dillon Gee, 24, 40
Travis Wood, 23, 38 1/3
Ivan Nova, 23, 38 1/3

That's not to say all of these pitchers will struggle or get hurt next season -- pitchers are being watch more closely than ever -- but it is something to watch.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb  on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com