Tag:Joakim Soria
Posted on: December 20, 2010 12:23 pm
 

K.C. has no plans to trade Soria

SoriaWith Zack Greinke's trade, many have turned their eyes to Joakim Soria as the next Royals star to leave town.

Don't bet on it, says FOX Sports' Ken Rosenthal, who says the Royals have no plans to move him despite fielding calls. The reasons are many, but start with Soria's club options for 2012, 2013 and 2014. The righty would would make $6 million in 2012, $8 million in 2013 and $8.75 million in 2014 if all options were picked up.

Since being selected in the Rule 5 draft, Soria has been one of the team's best closers and at just age 26 could convert back to the starting rotation easily, but it appears the Royals won't pursue that avenue. 

In addition to the club options, Soria enjoys K.C. and sets a good example for other pitchers. Given there will be quite an infusion of young pitching over the next few seasons, Soria could play an important role in the transition.

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb  on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Category: MLB
Posted on: November 23, 2010 2:19 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 12:29 pm
 

Hamilton runs away with AL MVP

Josh Hamilton wins the American League MVP, and while it wasn't quite the landslide that Joey Votto's NL victory was, it wasn't close, either.

Hamilton collected 22 of the 28 first-place votes, had four second-place votes and two fourth-place votes for a total of 358 points. Detroit's Miguel Cabrera was second, finishing with five first-place votes and 262 overall points. Robinson Cano was third (229) and Toronto's Jose Bautista was fourth with one first-place vote and 165 total points.

Josh Hamilton Here's the final voting
Josh Hamilton, Rangers 358
Miguel Cabrera, Tigers 262
Robinson Cano, Yankees 229
Jose Bautista, Blue Jays 165
Paul Konerko, White Sox, 130
Evan Longoria, Rays 100
Carl Crawford, Rays 98
Joe Mauer, Twins 97
Adrian Beltre, Red Sox 83
Delmon Young, Twins 44
Vladimir Guerrero, Rangers 22
Rafael Soriano, Rays 21
CC Sabathia, Yankees 13
Shin-Soo Choo, Indians 9
Alex Rodriguez, Yankees 8
Felix Hernandez, Mariners 6
Ichiro Suzuki, Mariners 3
Jim Thome, Twins 2
Joakim Soria, Royals 1
Mark Teixeira, Yankees 1

An interesting note, both of the MVPs made their debut for the Reds in 2007, Hamilton on opening day and Votto after rosters expanded in September. The Reds traded Hamilton after the 2007 season to the Rangers for pitcher Edinson Volquez and Daniel Ray Herrera.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.


Posted on: October 11, 2010 6:31 pm
Edited on: October 13, 2010 10:33 am
 

R.I.P. Royals: Help is on the way

As the sports world waits for the crowning of a champion, 22 other teams are busy preparing for spring training. What went wrong for these teams, and what does 2011 hold? MLB Facts and Rumors here at CBS Sports will be answering those questions through all of October. Today: The Kansas City Royals

Oh Royals, through the 70s and 80s, the team was the model franchise. Since the turn of the century, the team's only been a punchline. That wasn't much different in 2010.

WHAT WENT WRONG

Yuniesky Betancourt Ewing Kauffman died in 1993. That's been the reason for the last 17 years of failure.

Oh, on the field? This year? Beyond Yuniesky Betancourt (pictured) being the team's shortstop? OK, Zack Greinke took a step back from his Cy Young 2009. Worse, he looked like another guy in a Royals uniform -- and that's not a good thing. Greinke went 10-14 with a 4.17 ERA.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

How about Bruce Chen? Chen was 12-7 with a 4.17 ERA (the same as Greinke) -- but if you're looking long-term success, you're not betting on Chen.

Other positives? Joakim Soria may have been the best closer in the game, even if he didn't have too many games to close. Soria finished with 43 saves, a 1.78 ERA and 71 strikeouts and 16 walks in 65 2/3 innings.

The team also got rid of overpaid veterans like Kyle Farnsworth, Jose Guillen, Scott Podsednik and Rick Ankiel.

HELP ON THE WAY

Oh, is there ever.

Mike Moustakas The Royals have the deepest minor league system in the majors. Of Baseball America's 15-man Minor League All-Star Team, a full third were Royals.

The Royals are deep in position players (first baseman Eric Hosmer, catcher Wil Myers and third baseman Mike Moustakas (pictured)) and pitchers (lefty starters John Lamb and Mike Montgomery, reliever Tim Collins).

That's the good news, the bad news is with all this talent, it's still not ready for the big leagues in 2011, maybe 2012.

EXPECTATIONS FOR 2011

Same as they always are in Kansas City -- grim. As noted, there's help on the way and maybe some of those guys can make their debut late in the season, but this won't be the season for the Royals to make a move. There is a brighter days ahead, but they aren't in the 10-day forecast.

SUGGESTIONS FOR 2011

Don't raise ticket prices, because it's going to be another long year.

Greinke has started griping about not wanting to wait around for the Royals to get better, but he's still under contract through 2012. There's no reason to trade him this offseason, his value is lower than it should be and the asking price will be better in 2011 -- either at the trade deadline or after the season.

The Royals have already picked up the $6 million club option for outfielder David DeJesus, and he'll certainly bring something at the trade deadline next year.

There will certainly be plenty of suitors trying to pick up Soria, who is under team control through 2014. Listen, but unless bowled over for a deal, he's too valuable and under control for too long to move.

No fan is going to want to hear that they need patience, but there is actually hope for the Royals after so long without it. If half their prospects turn out as expected, they'll be the new Rays.

2011 PREDICTION

Same as it ever was. The Royals will be out of the picture by the All-Star break, and Ned Yost may even worry about his job. The only drama in September will be whether this team loses 100 games. But this time next year, there may be some excitement for 2012.

Check out the rest of the R.I.P. reports here.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .

Posted on: July 26, 2010 11:05 am
Edited on: July 26, 2010 1:09 pm
 

Yankees making a bid for Soria


Joakim Soria New York already has the best team in baseball, are the Yankees looking to add the best nickname in baseball?

Jon Heyman of Sports Illustrated says the Yankees have made a "big proposal" for Royals closer Joakim Soria, "the Mexicutioner."

It would make sense for the Yankees, Joba Chamberlain hasn't exactly performed so well as the bridge to Mariano Rivera that people are trying to push the old man out the door. Soria has 27 saves so far this season, had 30 last year and 42 the season before. He has a career 1.007 WHIP and a 2.12 ERA, including a 2.25 ERA this season, striking out more than a batter an inning.

What's even more appealing is that he's under team control through 2014, so he can't just become a free agent and sign with the Yankees. If he's a Yankee, we can just go ahead to 2015 without all that pointless waiting.

However, that's exactly why the Yankees need to make a "big" proposal for Soria. The Royals actually have some talent on the farm and could contend for a .500 record in 2012 or 2013 -- and wouldn't have to worry about a closer.

Soria makes a bargain $4 million next season with club options for 2012 ($6 million), 2013 ($8 million) and 2014 ($8.75 million). None of those types of numbers would make the Yankees blink -- even for a middle reliever.

However, besides Jesus Montero, New York doesn't have impact players in their farm system. Catcher Austin Romine would be a good get for the Royals, but hardly the value the team needs for Soria. The Yankees were said to be dangling Ivan Nova, Zach McAllister and possibly Chamberlain for Dan Haren. A similar package may be enough to pry Soria from the Royals and make the Yankees even more of a favorite than they are today.

UPDATE: In an online chat, ESPN's Jayson Stark says the Yankees have at least discussed the possibility of sending Montero to Kansas City for Soria, which may be the only way this deal makes sense for the Royals -- unless the Yankees bring the Mets in to send Dayton Moore's crush, Jeff Francoeur,  to KC, which may not make baseball sense, but when has that stopped Moore? CoughAnkielCoughKendallCough

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.



Posted on: July 21, 2010 2:17 pm
Edited on: July 21, 2010 3:32 pm
 

Trade deadline buyer: Los Angeles Angels

As the July 31 non-waiver trade deadline looms, the CBS Facts & Rumors team will look at the biggest players leading up to the deadline. This week we'll look at the teams who will be talked about the most; next week will be the players who might be moved.
Tony Reagins
The Angels are talking a lot of big talk about having the resources to get whatever is needed to overtake the Rangers -- who have added Cliff Lee and show no signs of slowing down -- in the American League West. So far, however, it hasn't amounted to more than talk. If Tony Reagins doesn't improve this team in the next couple of weeks, expect heavy criticism in L.A.

Record: 51-45, five games behind Texas and three ahead of Oakland in the AL West. Third in AL wild-card race, 6 1/2 games behind Tampa Bay.
General manager: Tony Reagins, third year
Expectations: High. The Angels are outspending Texas by $50 million in payroll and winning despite injuries and underperforming players. Nothing short of the playoffs will be acceptable.
Payroll status: Opening day payroll was over $105 million, eighth-highest in baseball, and the Angels already have more than $80 million committed for next year.

What they need

Bullpen help:
The Angels have been living on the edge in the late innings, and their bullpen has a 4.48 ERA, 12th in the AL. They haven't had anybody step up -- only Fernando Rodney (3.29) has an ERA under 3.80.

Starting pitching: The Angels are ninth in the AL in starters' ERA, and would like to at least find a fifth starter with nothing panning out in-house. They traded for Scott Kazmir at last season's deadline and he has been awful (and is now on the DL).

A bat: When first baseman Kendry Morales suffered his infamous celebratory injury, breaking his leg and knocking himself out for the year, it was a big
blow to the Angels' offense. If they are going to make a big move, it's probably going to be for a first baseman or third baseman with pop.

Who may fit

Derrek Lee Starting pitcher:
Not many teams could take on Roy Oswalt's contract, but the Angels -- cash-rich and prospect-poor -- might be a decent fit. Dan Haren would look good in Anaheim, but the Angels might not have the "wow" package the Diamondbacks say it would take. More likely than going ace shopping would be going to get someone like Kyle Farnsworth or Jake Westbrook.

Reliever: The market for relievers is not good. The Angels might be left to pick over the Toronto bullpen and decide whether they want Scott Downs, Jason Frasor or Kevin Gregg. David Aardsma is available in Seattle, or they could try to pry Royals closer Joakim Soria.

Bat: It's conceivable the Angels could be in play on any of the big names. First basemen Derrek Lee, Prince Fielder and Lance Berkman could be had for a price. That might seem short-sighted, given that Morales will be back next year, but the Angels are under the gun. They might be better off going after someone to play third, where the Angels don't have a good long-term option, but the crop there is less impressive. Or despite Adam Dunn's insistence that he doesn't want to be a DH, the Angels could get him and make him do it anyway.

Trade chips

Mike Trout Here's the biggest problem the Angels face: The cupboard is seriously bare in the upper minors. On Sunday, they used Paul McAnulty (called up July 4) to pinch-hit in extra innings, then designated him for assignment after the game. That's how thin they are -- guys they're calling up to help are throwaways.

At a minimum, the Angels are going to have to part with switch-hitting Triple-A catcher Hank Conger, who's batting .265 at Salt Lake City. There's also Triple-A first baseman Mark Trumbo, who hits a lot of homers but strikes out a lot.

Of course, the Angels do have one monster prospect in outfielder Mike Trout at Class A, but he's considered a potential superstar and it's tough to see them giving him up even under the current win-now pressure.

Predictions


The Angels will find a way to get one of the big bats and add at least one reliever. Reagins is going to have to gut what's left of his farm system to do it, so he'd better hope it works.

-- David Andriesen

More trade deadline chatter -- Buyers: New York Yankees ; Sellers: Florida Marlins

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.




Posted on: July 19, 2010 1:21 pm
Edited on: July 19, 2010 4:16 pm
 

Trade deadline buyer: New York Yankees

As the July 31 non-waiver trade deadline looms, the CBS Facts & Rumors team will look at the biggest players leading up to the deadline. This week we'll look at the teams who will be talked about the most; next week will be the players who might be moved.

Every transaction talk, be it trades or free agents, seems to start with the Yankees and this time is no different.

Brian Cashman Record: 58-33, three games ahead of the Rays and 6 1/2 in front of the Red Sox.
GM: Brian Cashman
Expectations: Anything short of another World Series title is failure, plain and simple.
Payroll status: Not that it matters, the Yankees had an opening day payroll of more than $213 million and already have more than $144 million on the books for 2011.

What they need

Starting pitcher: With Andy Pettitte on the disabled list and A.J. Burnett's recent hissy fit, the Yankees suddenly look to need at least one starter. Until now, the opening day rotation of CC Sabathia, Pettitte, Burnett, Javier Vazquez and Phil Hughes had started all but two of their games. That could be matched this week alone. The team may also be wary of letting Hughes' innings add up through a pennant race and the playoffs. Sergio Mitre is scheduled to start in Pettitte's place, but until now, he's been more successful as a reliever than a starter.

Bullpen help: Starting pitching isn't the only pitching concern the Yankees have as Joba Chamberlain's days as the bridge to Mariano Rivera may be numbered, and it's not as if Chan Ho Park is going to step up and replace him.

Damaso Marte was placed on the disabled list this weekend with Boone Logan called up as the team's only left-handed reliever.

Big bat: Marcus Thames has been better than expected as the Yankees designated hitter, hitting .287/.396/.437 with three homers and 13 RBI in 87 at-bats, but he's hardly a difference-maker. This spot -- especially if Jorge Posada is healthy enough not to need a DH safety net -- could be upgraded, especially if that upgrade could be a spot starter in the outfield.

Bench help: After the regulars, the Yankees feature the likes of Ramiro Pena and Colin Curtis. The team could certainly upgrade its depth in both the infield and the outfield.

Who may fit

Ted Lilly Starting pitcher: Cliff Lee would have been a great fit, but he's gone. Lee was the marquee name available and there's a decided step down after the newest Texas Ranger. Other starters out there are Ted Lilly, Jake Westbrook, Brett Myers, Roy Oswalt, Dan Haren and maybe even someone like Brian Bannister.

Reliever: There are stop-gap attempts like David Aardsma and Leo Nunez, or the Yankees could go for the kill with someone like Royals closer Joakim Soria. Soria is under club control until 2014, so it would take more than just cash, but also top-flight prospects to get the Royals closer and team him with Rivera to make a formidable back of the bullpen.

Other, less expensive, fits could be either of the Blue Jays pair of relievers, Scott Downs or Jason Frasor.

Bat: Again, going for the kill would be Adam Dunn. Dunn in new Yankee Stadium would be a marriage made in heaven. Dunn doesn't want to DH and he doesn't really have any other value, but he would flourish both in the American League and in pinstripes. Still, the Yankees may not want to give up too much for a player they can just buy in the offseason.

If the Yankees can find a top-end starter, they could send Vazquez to Philadelphia for Jayson Werth. David DeJesus would upgrade the outfield, as well.

Bench help:
Wes Helms and Ty Wigginton are corner possibilities and Wigginton can play second, as well. Xavier Nady and Austin Kearns are possible outfield bats that may not be big, but could work for the Yankees.

Trade chips

Jesus Montero Catching prospect Jesus Montero was reportedly only available for Lee, however the almighty dollar is always available. Any team looking to clear cash off the bottom line will talk to the Yankees, who could send middling prospects loaded up with money sacks to any team that's interested. And there are always teams interested in that kind of prospect.

Right-hander Zach McAllister is 7-6 with a 4.82 ERA in 18 starts at Triple-A. He doesn't have dominant stuff, but has good control and projects as a back of the rotation-type pitcher.

Right-hander Ivan Nova, 23, has better stats than McAllister (7-2, 3.21, 78 strikeouts in 103 2/3 innings) and has an impressive fastball. Nova has impressive talent, but has also struggled with consistency as a pro. This season is his best yet, and there's a question as to whether he's reached his ceiling. Still, he's got enough talent to be intriguing to other teams.

Mark Melancon has long been bantered about as the replacement for Rivera when Mo decides to turn his sights to Cooperstown, but Melancon has yet to live up to that hype. He could be one of those players that need a change in scenery to live up to his potential, and there's enough potential for other teams to take a chance on him.

Other possibilities include SS Eduardo Nunez and 2B David Adams, who was one of the other guys mentioned in the Lee trade.

Predictions: The Yankees will add a reliever and a starter -- possibly Lilly and the lefty Downs. Other than that, the team may think it doesn't have to do too much to keep ahead of the Rays and Red Sox.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.


Posted on: July 16, 2010 5:20 pm
Edited on: July 16, 2010 7:39 pm
 

Yankees would love Dunn, Soria


The Yankees would love to have Adam Dunn and Joakim Soria, FOX Sports' Ken Rosenthal tweets , but adds the caveats that the Nationals asking price for Dunn is "exorbitant" and the "Royals would need to be overwhelmed" to deal their closer.

Dunn is a free agent after the season, but the Nationals must feel they have the inside track at re-signing him. Dunn's value is mostly to American League teams, like the Yankees, who would use him as a designated hitter. Dunn, though, has repeatedly stated his preference to play the field, perhaps limiting his field of teams to National League squads. That would play in favor of the Nationals for him staying. If he signed with an AL club, the temptation would be too great for any manager to be able to get his bat without his glove.

Soria, on the other hand, is valuable and affordable. He signed an extension two years ago that has him under team control through 2014.

Although Soria's name is being thrown around in trade talks, it makes no sense for the Royals to deal him if they think they can compete in the next four seasons.

So, really, my next tweet may be that I'm married, but would love to get calls from two women: Scarlett Johansson and Christina Hendricks. (I do realize it's a flawed comparison, but while I'm no New York Yankees, Dunn and Soria are hardly Johansson and Hendricks.)

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.
Posted on: July 3, 2010 9:59 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 12:16 pm
 

Scioscia against All-Stars for every team


Jose Rosado Because I grew up a Royals fan everywhere but Missouri, I've always been a fan of the rule requiring each team to have at least one representative for the All-Star Game.

Whether I lived in Cuba, Virginia, Texas, Japan or Georgia -- I was always guaranteed to see someone in a Royals uniform (usually George Brett) on TV every year. Not that the Royals of my youth needed the courtesy All-Star, they'd usually earned more than one berth in the game, but still, I knew there'd always be at least one. Sometimes that was the only time all year I'd be able to see a Royal on TV.

Now, though, I could -- if I wanted to punish myself -- watch just about every pitch of the Royals' awful season. With my MLB.tv subscription, my PS3, iPad and iPhone, I can watch those beautiful powder blue tops no matter where I go. That technology -- not to mention the advent of MLB Network, cable and satellite -- may have made the reason for the rule to have every team represented obsolete.

Angels manager Mike Scioscia said he thinks the rule should no longer apply.

"I'm all in favor of having guidelines where you try and represent every team," Scioscia told reporters, including the Orange County Register . "To have a hard-line rule, I think there are exceptions where a team doesn't have anyone All-Star worthy."

Scioscia was the manager of the All-Star team in 2003, when Lance Carter of the Ryas made the team with a 4.05 ERA and six blown saves.

"It's really a misnomer to say the manager picks the All-Star team. It doesn't happen," Scioscia said. "That team, with the guidelines in place, is virtually picked before it ever gets to the [manager]."

The rule helps explain why Jose Rosado's obituary will list him as a two-time All-Star and Mark Redman has an appearance on his resume.

There are currently 13 teams with losing records, some have obvious choices (like, say, the Cubs' Marlon Byrd or the Indians' Shin-Soo Choo), while it's a little tougher to choose a worthy All-Star from a team like the 24-55 Orioles (Ty Wigginton, Luke Scott?) or the 32-49 Astros (Dan Haren and his 4.56 ERA?)

Not all bad teams are created equally. The 33-46 Mariners have three worthy All-Stars in Ichiro Suzuki (who will no doubt be voted into the starting lineup by fans), Cliff Lee (if he's still a Mariner in a week) and Felix Hernandez. Even the Royals, at 35-45, wouldn't be embarrassed by David DeJesus, Joakim Soria or even Zack Greinke, who is having a down year.

If the game is truly for the fans, why not let it represent all the fans, and not just the Yankees and Red Sox? Baseball's All-Star Game is a celebration of the game with its best players and some of its nearly-best player or best players on one team. In the end, after injuries and the new rule against pitchers who pitch on Sunday throwing again in the All-Star Game on Tuesday, is it really that terrible to have the 75th best player in the game "snubbed" for the 131st?

In the end, I think of the 11-year old me waiting for Kevin Seitzer to get in the game, even if that visual is as anachronistic as my father listening to the Kansas City A's on the radio. Maybe out there somewhere, there's a kid excited about watch Andrew McCutchen get in the game, even if it's not "fair".

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com