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Tag:Tim Lincecum
Posted on: July 11, 2011 6:42 pm
Edited on: July 11, 2011 7:02 pm
 

Lincecum speaks on multiple Giants as All-Stars

By Matt Snyder

PHOENIX - Everywhere you looked on media day, there was a Giants player. Matt Cain, Ryan Vogelsong, Pablo Sandoval, Brian Wilson and Tim Lincecum were all there representing the defending World Champions.

CBSSports.com sat with Lincecum, the ace of the staff, to see if he believed this was partially a reward for last season's success.



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Posted on: July 7, 2011 10:34 am
Edited on: July 7, 2011 1:43 pm
 

Pepper: Hurdle responds to Bochy comments



Barry Zito seeks his third straight win since coming off the DL while Jered Weaver looks to keep his hot streak going. Eye on Baseball Blogger Matt Snyder joins Lauren Shehadi to discuss those storylines and more in this edition of Baseball Today.

By Evan Brunell


ALL-STAR CRITICISM: Giants manager Bruce Bochy wasn't happy about criticism that Pirates manager Clint Hurdle and Marlins manager Jack McKeon leveled about his choices on who made the All-Star roster. Hurdle was annoyed that Andrew McCutchen hadn't made the team while McKeon questioned the selection of Bochy's player in Tim Lincecum.

Well, Hurdle fired back after hearing Bochy's comments, specifically that Hurdle and McKeon never lobbied for their players while other managers did, so how can they speak out against the selections?

"I don't think lobbying is a part of what you do in that position," said Hurdle, who has experience with the All-Star Game, managing it in 2008 when he represented the Rockies. "He's earned that opportunity by winning the National League championship. I just have never lobbied, and I never got any calls from any other managers lobbying the year I did it."

Hurdle did apologize if his comments were hurtful to Bochy.

"I have the most professional respect for Boch," Hurdle said. "He's a better manager than I'll ever be. My feelings came from the heart. Diplomacy, I guess, wasn't at the top of my list that day, and I can understand that as well.

"I've been on the other end of that. I just know that I took it with a grain of salt, and he felt he made the best decision for the National League because that's his job to represent. I wish the National League nothing but the most success that we go out and win the game.

"We've known each other back to when we were 16 years old. I can understand he's disappointed in what I had to say. I can deal with that."

McCutchen still has a chance to get on the roster as Ryan Braun from Milwaukee is hobbled by an inflamed tendon, and if he cannot play this weekend, will pull out of the game. (MLB.com)

ALL-STAR INVITE: Albert Pujols says he would be honored to go to the All-Star Game should he be selected as a replacement. Pujols missed his chance at going to the game thanks to his wrist injury, but could still squeak in as players pull out because of injuries or other reasons. It's possible Pujols could replace Braun. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

DODGER DEBACLE: More information in the saga that just won't go away. MLB has filed a motion that Dodgers owner Frank McCourt should not have the right to see various documents that McCourt is requesting, alleging that releasing the documents would turn the bankruptcy court hearing into "a multi-ringed sideshow of mini-trials on his personal disputes." (Los Angeles Times)

FIRST TIME FOR EVERYTHING: Davey Johnson has never ordered a suicide squeeze, per his own recollections. That changed Wednesday night for the Nationals. Wilson Ramos dropped a successful bunt, allowing Mike Morse to cross the plate with what turned out to be the winning run. (CSN Washington)

WHAT EYE PROBLEM? Mike Stanton visited an ophthalmologist Wednesday and received eye drops to combat an eye infection that has sent him spiraling into a slump. He's received eye drops and apparently they worked as he slammed a walk-off home run against the Phillies on Wednesday night to give the Marlins a victory. (MLB.com)

YOU'RE NO PUJOLS: Apparently Cleveland's Shin-Soo Choo is hoping to pull an Albert Pujols and get back on the field earlier than expected. After breaking his left thumb and staring at a diagnosis of eight-to-10 weeks out, Choo is telling friends he believes he can be back in early August. Given how fast Pujols returned, I suppose you can't rule it out, but ... well, don't go wagering on an early Choo return. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)

YEAH AND NO: That was the Dodgers' Andre Ethier's answer when asked if he was pleased with his performance so far. Hitting a career-high .317 is great, but Ethier's seven home runs are a sudden loss of power for someone who slammed 31 two seasons ago. (Los Angeles Times)

WORKHORSE: Justin Verlander has made 37 consecutive starts of 100-plus pitches, which is tops in baseball all the way back to 1999, and probably a bit farther back, too. Second place boasts Felix Hernandez at 32 consecutive games from 2009-10, while Randy Johnson pops up multiple times. (Baseball-Reference)

UNSAVORY COMPARISON: Just three months into Jayson Werth's massive seven-year deal with Washington, and he's already being compared to another player who was a colossal bust on his own big deal, not that it was his fault for the team throwing ill-advised money at him. "Him" is Alfonso Soriano, and that's definitely company Werth does not want to be associated with. (Washington Post)

JONES HURTING: Chipper Jones admitted he shouldn't have played Tuesday after he received a cortisone shot for a meniscus tear as he is trying to avoid surgery. “I just didn’t feel right [Tuesday]," he said. "Not having that first step quickness, you favor it. It’s hard to stay on back of it right-handed, swinging the bat. Just one of those things we’ve got to continue to monitor and deal with.” For his part, Jones says he was perfectly fine for Wednesday's game. (Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

FIGGINS BENCHED: Finally. Chone Figgins has been benched and has easily become one of the largest albatrosses in the game. Figgin's replacement is Kyle Seager, who was promoted from the minors and will stay at third for the foreseeable future. (Seattle Times)

BARGAIN: Who were the best bargains signed as free agents in the winter? There are some worthy candidates in Bartolo Colon, Erik Bedard, Ryan Vogelsong and Brandon McCarthy. Fine seasons, all. But the best bargain is another pitcher, Phil Humber. Hard to disagree. (MLB Daily Dish)

CRAWFORD EN ROUTE: The Red Sox can't wait to get Carl Crawford back, and it looks as if that will happen after the first series back, which is in Tropicana Field. The Sox want to avoid Crawford playing on artificial turf right away, so a July 18 return in Baltimore appears likely (Providence Journal)

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: July 6, 2011 12:32 pm
Edited on: July 6, 2011 12:50 pm
 

Bochy upset at Hurdle, McKeon criticism

McCutchenBy Evan Brunell

Pirates manager Clint Hurdle says Bruce Bochy, the manager for the NL All-Star team thanks to winning the World Series with the Giants last season, "whiffed" on not selecting Andrew McCutchen (pictured) to the team.

New Marlins skipper Jack McKeon also spoke out, wondering how Bochy could have justified taking Tim Lincecum with a 6-7 record. (Hint to Jack: His ERA is 3.14, and he's pitched better than that figure.)

Understandably, Bochy is a bit bruised from being called out.

“What’s bothered me are some comments made from other managers because now you start getting a little personal and [you] disparage other players,’’ Bochy told the San Jose Mercury News. “I don’t think that’s what the game is about.”

Bochy also added that he never heard from Hurdle or McKeon before selecting the team, but other managers called to lobby for their players. "The two that are complaining I’ve known for 25 years," Bochy said. "I didn’t hear from them. Sure, that bothers me.”

The Giants skipper, who opted to take Mets right-fielder Carlos Beltran with his "at-large" pick instead of McCutchen, called the Pirates star a "great young player," but added that the 24-year-old's recent hitting streak came too late. McCutchen ended April with a .219/.330/.417 line, but his OPS has gone up in each month since. He's currently hitting .291/.390/.494 with 12 home runs and 15 stolen bases, absolutely worthy of selection.

“I could go to every team and there’s a guy who didn’t make it and has the numbers to be there,’’ Bochy said. “You don’t want to snub anybody.”

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Posted on: July 4, 2011 9:59 am
Edited on: July 4, 2011 12:58 pm
 

Pepper: Head indoors during All-Star Weekend



By C. Trent Rosecrans
 

It's not that I'm not looking forward to heading to Phoenix on Saturday; it's just that, well, it's going to be really, really hot and that doesn't sound like fun.

The average temperature in Phoenix on July 12? 107. I don't care how dry that heat is, it's still hot.

Phoenix has wanted to host an All-Star Game for years, but with the All-Star Game comes more than just nine innings of baseball. There's the Futures Game, a celebrity softball game, the Home Run Derby, FanFest and an influx of people, all walking around the area around the ballpark. Anyone outside is going to be hot.

The Diamondbacks are planning as many things indoors as they can, according to this Arizona Republic article. The team may open the roof for a possible flyover during the national anthem, but that would take place during the hottest part of the day.

Also, the usual parade will be about two blocks and players have been told not to wear suits and ties.

Team president Derrick Hall tells the newspaper, "I think everyone is going to be shocked how comfortable it's going to be."

I hope so. Then I can get ready for Kansas City next July -- and that could be even worse, just ask Ichiro (language NSFW).

CLOSER QUESTION: Twins manager Ron Gardenhire stood behind closer Matt Capps after pulling him Sunday, but Capps may not be the closer for long. He has blown six saves in 19 chances, and Joe Nathan is back and healthy. [Minneapolis Star-Tribune]

FREAK OR FISH?: Marlins manager Jack McKeon questioned Bruce Bochy's selection of Tim Lincecum for the All-Star team. "He's a good pitcher, don't get me wrong," McKeon told reporters, including Joe Capozzi of the Palm Beach Post. "But do we reward for what you're doing now or do we reward for what you've done in the past."

DERBY LOBBYING: Not only are two captains picking the sides for this year's Home Run Derby, they can pick players who aren't in the All-Star Game to participate. Here's two non-All-Stars I'd love to see. Bob Young of the Arizona Republic suggests Ichiro Suzuki, which may sound odd, but Suzuki's batting practice displays are the stuff of legend, and what is the Derby but glorified batting practice? I'd give Suzuki a better shot than most at winning the deal. While Suzuki doesn't look like a guy who would be a Home Run Derby favorite, the Marlins' Mike Stanton does. Marlins first baseman Gaby Sanchez wants to see his teammate in the derby, and so do I. [Palm Beach Post]

NO REHAB FOR PUJOLS: Albert Pujols "doesn't need" a rehab assignment before he returns to the Cardinals, St. Louis manager Tony La Russa told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on Sunday.

RECORD DEAL: The Rangers signed Dominican outfielder Nomar Mazara with what is believed to be a record $5 million signing bonus. The 6-foot-3, 16-year-old left-handed outfielder is said to have the most raw power in Latin America. [Baseball America]

SELLOUT RECORD: Saturday the Dayton Dragons, the Reds' Class A team in the Midwest League, recorded their 814th sellout in a row, tying the all-time professional sports record set by the Portland Trail Blazers. The team expects to break the record July 9.

While the Dayton Daily News has the news, the New York Times takes a look at just why the Dragons have been so successful.

HISTORICALLY BAD: As bad as the Padres' offense has been this season, it's not as bad as the Mariners' last season -- so there's that. Otherwise, the outlook is bleak for San DIego bats. [North County Times]

STEREOTYPES DISPUTED: Former Cubs and current White Sox TV analyst Steve Stone says the stereotypes of Cubs fans and White Sox aren't exactly true. Cubs fans are usually believed to be more interested in being at Wrigley Field than what's going on at Wrigley Field. The stereotype of White Sox fans is best displayed by the buffoons who get liquored up and run on the field to attack either the umpire or the opposing team's first base coach. [Chicago Tribune]

VLAD'S BATS HEATING UP: Vladimir Guerrero isn't producing at the plate, but his bats are. Orioles right fielder Nick Markakis is crushing with Guerrero's bats, hitting .436 in his last 21 games since switching to Guerrero's heavier bats. [Baltimore Sun]

PADRES DRAFT COULD BE GREAT: Well, the Padres' draft could be a great one if the team spends the money to sign the players it drafted. The Royals stopped worrying about "signability," and David Glass started paying the going rate for drafted players. That's how the Royals built the best farm system in the majors. If the Padres follow suit, it could certainly pay off in the end. [InsideThePadres]

HOSMER USED TO OVERCOMING: Check out this fantastic feature by my friend Kent Babb of the Kansas City Star on Royals first baseman Eric Hosmer and his family. Hosmer's dad was a firefighter and his mother a nurse who immigrated from Cuba.

RACIAL BIAS BY UMPS: A study recently published in the American Economic Review shows a small difference in called strikes when the umpire and the pitcher are the same race. But the bias disappeared in games with computer monitoring, which is now standard across MLB. (H/T to BaseballMusings.com

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Posted on: July 3, 2011 8:38 pm
Edited on: July 7, 2011 10:59 am
 

Halladay, Weaver should start All-Star Game



By C. Trent Rosecrans

Perhaps the list of who won't be starting the All-Star Game is as impressive as who may start the game on July 12 at Chase Field in Phoenix.

Because of the rule that pitchers who start on the Sunday before the game are ineligible to pitch in the All-Star Game, Justin Verlander, James Shields, Matt Cain, Felix Hernandez, Cole Hamels, CC Sabathia and Jon Lester won't be getting the nod to start the game. However, it should be noted that neither Sabathia nor Lester were selected to the team, perhaps with an eye toward the fact they wouldn't be able to pitch in the game.

With those pitchers eliminated from the competition, it's easier to pick the starters for next Tuesday's game. We'll continue the process of elimination to determine the starters for the All-Star Game.

National League

Without Hamels and Cain, there are six pitchers left to pick from. It's unlikely that Tim Lincecum or Ryan Vogelsong of the Giants would be headed to Phoenix if San Francisco manger Bruce Bochy wasn't making the picks, so cross them off the list. That leaves Roy Halladay, Jair Jurrjens, Clayton Kershaw and Cliff Lee.

I'd be surprised if Kershaw didn't start an All-Star Game in his career, but it's not this year. He's got the potential to be as good as anyone in the game, but he's allowed six earned runs in three of his last six starts, so he's out.

Cliff Lee had an unbelievable June, but take that away and he's 4-6 with a 4.23 ERA. He's out.

So it comes down to the two 11-game winners, Halladay and Jurrjens. Jurrjens leads in ERA at 1.89, while Halladay has a 2.44 ERA. Halladay has more strikeouts, 131 to 63 and also leads in WHIP (1.027 to 1.061). Either one would be a good pick, but expect Bochy to go with the veteran Halladay, and it's tough to argue picking Halladay for about anything. His track record gives him the edge.

American League

If Verlander and Shields were in this discussion, it would be a lot more difficult. So in the also-rans, we'll start with C.J. Wilson. Wilson is 8-3 with a 3.14 ERA, good numbers to be sure, but not elite. Like Bochy picking two of his starters (and 60 percent of his starting rotation), Rangers manager Ron Washington was looking out for one of his own players by picking him over Sabathia or Lester, so he's out of the discussion.

David Price is 8-6 with a 3.43 ERA with 116 strikeouts, a good half-season to be sure, but not an All-Star starting pitcher.

Gio Gonzalez is that under-the-radar starter who has been lights-out this season, going 8-5 with a 2.31 ERA and 106 strikeouts in 109 innings. Gonzalez is fourth in the American League in ERA but his WHIP is an improved 1.235, which is decent but not in the Top 10 in the league.

Jered Weaver and Josh Beckett are both in the top three in both ERA and WHIP, with Weaver first in ERA (1.92) and third in WHIP (0.921) to Verlander (0.862). Beckett trails Weaver in ERA (2.12) and jumped ahead of him in WHIP (0.906) with Sunday's performance. If you're one of those people who puts value in pitcher's wins as a stat, Weaver leads all American Leaguers eligible to pitch in the game with 10 wins, while Beckett's pedestrian record of 6-3 belies what he's been able to do on the mound this season.

Weaver had a case to start last season season's game in Anaheim, but wasn't eligible because he'd started the Sunday before the game. He's scheduled to start on Thursday, putting him on track to start again on July 12, and he should get that chance.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.


Posted on: July 3, 2011 12:39 pm
Edited on: July 3, 2011 3:39 pm
 

National League pitchers and reserves

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Albert Pujols may be back before the All-Star Game, the Cardinals said on Saturday, but he won't be on the All-Star team. Here's the rest of the National League team:

National League

Pitchers

Jonny Venters, Braves (players' pick)

Clayton Kershaw, Dodgers (players' pick)

Cole Hamels, Phillies (players' pick)

Jair Jurrjens, Braves (players' pick)

Joel Hanrahan, Pirates (players' pick)

Heath Bell, Padres (manager's pick)

Matt Cain, Giants (manager's pick)

Roy Halladay, Phillies (players' pick)

Tim Lincecum, Giants (manager's pick)

Brian Wilson, Giants (players' pick)

Ryan Vogelsong, Giants (manager's pick)

Cliff Lee, Phillies (player's pick)

Tyler Clippard, Nationals (manager's pick)

Reserves

OF Justin Upton, Diamondbacks (manager's pick)

3B Chipper Jones, Braves (players' pick)

SS Starlin Castro, Cubs (manager's pick)

2B Brandon Phillips, Reds (players' pick)

OF Jay Bruce, Reds (players' pick)

1B Joey Votto, Reds (players' pick)

SS Troy Tulowitzki, Rockies (players' pick)

1B Gaby Sanchez, Marlins (manager's pick)

OF Hunter Pence, Astros (players' pick)

OF Carlos Beltran, Mets (manager's pick)

OF Matt Holliday, Cardinals (players' pick)

C Yadier Molina, Cardinals (players' pick)

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: June 29, 2011 4:56 pm
Edited on: June 29, 2011 7:57 pm
 

On Deck: Battle in the Bronx

OD

By Matt Snyder


Five days games Wednesday, but that leaves 10 for the night time. We've heard -- and will continue to hear -- plenty about the Red Sox-Phillies series, so let's mix it up and check out three different games.

Division Leaders Square Off: Yeah, the Red Sox are actually in second place, so there's only one game between two teams in first place Wednesday, and that comes to us from the Bronx. The Yankees enter Wednesday night with a three-game winning streak and a 1-1/2 game lead over the Red Sox in the AL East. The Brewers have a two-game lead in the NL Central, but will be looking for a measure of revenge after being pummelled 12-2 by the Yankees Tuesday evening. Shaun Marcum (7-2, 2.95) gets the nod for the Brewers, and he's 0-4 with a 6.62 ERA in his last eight starts at Yankee Stadium (including both old and new). The Yankees send A.J. Burnett (7-6, 4.15), but the true draw in this game is the power on each side. Of the six players in the majors with 20-plus home runs on the season, three are playing in this game -- and that doesn't include Ryan Braun, A-Rod or a host of other sluggers. Milwaukee at New York (AL), 7:05 p.m. ET. Watch Live Scoring

Looking for No. 1: Davey Johnson took over as the Nationals manager Monday and he's lost his first two games. This comes after a stretch where the Nationals won 13 of 15 games and pushed themselves into the Wild Card picture. Wednesday, they'll look to get their new skipper his first victory against the Angels, who are 1-1/2 games out in the AL West. Upon first glance, the pitching matchup should favor the Angels, as it's Dan Haren (7-5, 3.05) against Jordan Zimmermann (5-6, 2.85), but look deeper. Zimmermann is 3-0 with a 1.05 ERA, 23 strikeouts and only six walks in June. Haren, on the other hand, is 3-3 with a 5.75 ERA and 1.50 WHIP in his last six starts. Washington at Los Angeles (AL), 7:05 p.m. ET. Watch Live Scoring

Picking Up Steam: Don't look now, but the hottest team in baseball is the defending World Series champions. The Giants have won seven games in a row. They've outscored opponents 34-16 in that span. Things shouldn't change much Wednesday night in Chicago, as the Giants send ace Tim Lincecum (6-6, 3.16) to the hill against the 32-48 Cubs. Lincecum scuffled a bit earlier this month, but looked just fine last time out, as the tossed seven shutout innings and struck out 12 in a win over the Twins. Ryan Dempster (5-6, 5.31) takes the hill for the Cubs, who are in fifth place in the NL Central and 12 games out of first place. San Francisco at Chicago (NL), 8:05 p.m. ET. Watch Live Scoring

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: June 24, 2011 1:25 am
Edited on: June 24, 2011 3:12 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Marquis wins in manager's last game

Riggleman

By Evan Brunell


3 upChris Carpenter, Cardinals -- Chris Carpenter hasn't been able to figure out how to win a game all season. Who knew the solution was to take Albert Pujols out of the lineup? Carp dropped the Phillies by a score of 2-2, rolling for seven innings and giving up just one run on five hits, walking one and striking out seven. It's just his second win of the season, taking his record up to 2-7. We'll revisit this game again in a minute.

Jason Marquis, Nationals -- Marquis now has the honor of being the starting pitcher of record on the day Jim Riggleman seemingly killed his career (more on this in a bit). Kind of funny, given Riggleman and Marquis had a public spat a few weeks ago. The righty was dazzling, limiting the Mariners to just three hits and three walks while punching out four and lowering his ERA to 3.54. It's an impressive bounceback season for someone many left for dead last season.

Tim Lincecum, Giants -- Yeah, it was the night of the pitcher, apparently. There were several other strong pitching performances on the five-game night, but Lincecum grabs the final spot with a dazzling performance that sent Minnesota to its second-straight loss. He threw gas for seven innings, whiffing 13 and giving up zero runs, limiting the Twinkies to just five baserunners on three hits and two walks. San Francisco ended up winning the game 2-1.



3 DownWily Mo Pena, Diamondbacks -- The more things change... Pena, who was recalled by Arizona to serve as the team's DH, blasted a home run in his first game. His second game was an 0-for-3 outing, and now his third game has a 1-for-4 performance, but no home run and... wait for it... three strikeouts. Yep, that's Wily Mo, who laid waste to Triple-A but seems right back to his old habits in the bigs. Still, what he did in Triple-A deserves more rope. He'll have to start hitting more if he hopes to stay with the club when Arizona ends interleague play.

Danys Baez, Phillies -- Roy Oswalt didn't do himself any favors by allowing four runs in two innings. Kyle Kendrick was able to stave off the bleeding with a two-run, four-inning effort, then Juan Perez got through a scoreless outing. At this time, the score was 6-1 and Philly at least had some home for a comeback. Not when Baez was finished, giving up six runs on four hits and two walks and just one K. But hey, this is Danys Baez, after all.

Jim Riggleman, Nationals -- By now, you probably know the story. Riggleman abruptly resigned as manager on Thursday as he was unhappy with his contract. On one hand, his actions were understandable. He did not feel wanted, felt shut out and was doing a fine job in this, his lame-duck last season. But the backlash has been rather severe, and Riggleman probably will get frozen out of any job of significance from hereon out, ala Mike Hargrove when he tendered his own resignation, saying he was just fatigued by baseball. (Riggleman actually ended up replacing John McLaren the next season; McLaren replaced Hargrove in Seattle and is replacing Riggleman for the weekend series coming up.)

Hargrove went on to manage a semipro team and is a special advisor to the Indians. It seems Riggleman will be lucky to get such a cushy gig, but things will probably blow over given time. But even if Riggleman was upset over his contract status, he should have had the foresight to manage the rest of the season, then either extract some serious security from the Nationals or walk away. And if he walked away, he wouldn't have had any issues finding a coaching job, and probably coud have interviewed for some manager's gig. But all that's probably gone now. It's a shame, as Riggleman is a good guy by all accounts. You wish he could have found a way to stick it out. To his credit, though, Riggleman seems to know exactly what type of repercussions his actions will have and was at peace with it. That's all you can really ask for.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com