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Tag:Yovani Gallardo
Posted on: August 11, 2011 12:37 pm
Edited on: August 11, 2011 2:56 pm
 

On Deck: Pivotal series come to a close



By Evan Brunell


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VerlanderVERLANDER TIME: The Indians have taken the first two games of the three-game set between AL Central rivals, leaving Cleveland just two games behind the Tigers for the lead. Unfortunately, Cleveland only has one Ubaldo Jimenez, and he pitched on Wednesday. That leaves Fausto Carmona, he of a 5.9 ERA, to do battle against Justin Verlander. That's a tall task, what with Verlander's amazing season leaving him in contention for the AL Cy Young Award. Verlander can accomplish two things on Thursday: first, the righty can snap Cleveland's 13-game winning streak against Detroit in Progressive FIeld, and he can also become the majors' first 17-game winner. Tigers vs. Indians, 7:05 p.m. ET

GallardoCarpenterGONE STREAKING: Another pivotal Central series comes to an end Thursday as well, except this one is over in the NL. The streaking Brewers are attempting to rip off a 6-0 road streak, their seventh straight win, push their MLB-best home record to 42-15 and extend their division lead to six games. Boy, that's a lot of accomplishments to reach in one game. The pitching matchup is pretty even, at least if you consider only ERA. Milwaukee has Yovani Gallardo with a 3.56 ERA toeing the mound, while St. Louis counters with a 3.75 figure. Brewers vs. Cardinals, 8:15 p.m. ET

RockiesRedsPITCHING DUEL: A pretty solid pitching matchup highlights this game, with Johnny Cueto taking the mound for the Reds and jockeying for the best ERA in in the game. Cueto's already qualified previously for the best ERA, but he fell out of consideration because he's right on the bubble to qualify for the lead. He's missed so much time, that even waiting five days for his next start can drop him out. All he needs is 4 2/3 innings and he reclaims his spot atop the ERA leaderboard. He won't have an easy time of it, as the Rockies will throw out Jhoulys Chacin, who has had a fine year in his first full season. He stumbled in July with a 4.97 ERA but has turned in two straight strong starts Rockies vs. Reds, 12:35 p.m. ET

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Posted on: July 14, 2011 5:08 pm
Edited on: July 14, 2011 5:25 pm
 

On Deck: Sanchez/Garza kicks off second half

On Deck

By Evan Brunell


SanchezGarzaBEST MATCHUP: We all know how poorly the Marlins fared in June during a streak that saw manager Edwin Rodriguez resign in favor of new skipper Jack McKeon. Well, Florida is working on a five-game streak that they'll put up against the Cubs with Anibal Sanchez in tow. Sanchez, who pitched a no-hitter way back in 2006, is hoping to shake off a lousy start to July that raised his ERA to 3.58. Still one of the better pitchers in the game, Sanchez has been bandied about as a possible trade candidate if the Marlins can't sustain their newfound winning ways leading up to the trade deadline. Matt Garza will toe the mound for Chicago, no stranger to trade rumors himself as he was dealt from Tampa Bay to Chicago in the offseason and was recently linked to the Red Sox. Garza, despite his 4.26 ERA, has strong peripherals and will be a difficult pitcher for Florida to handle. Marlins vs. Cubs, 8:05 p.m. ET (Watch live)

HollandHOLLAND ROLLING
: Manager Ron Washington was so pleased by Derek Holland's four-hitter before the break that the lefty drew the first start after the break despite an up-and-down season. Holland will be charged with defending a seven-game winning streak against the Mariners, who will send Jason Vargas to the mound. In a battle of lefties, Vargas has the better numbers but at just age 24, Holland boasts the better upside. The going is tough when you pitch in Rangers Ballpark, but he's equipped himself well thus far and will have the pitching haven of Safeco Field working for him Thursday night. Holland hasn't quite made the leap toward being an excellent pitcher, but as a middle-of-the-rotation hurler, many teams could do worse. Rangers vs. Mariners, 10:10 p.m. ET (Watch live)

BrewersRodriguezK-ROD ARRIVES
: Another nice pitching matchup is in store with young Brewers righty Yovani Gallardo going up against Ubaldo Jimenez. Gallardo was once a lock to become a dominating pitcher, but hasn't taken that jump yet. At just age 25, it's not as if Gallardo is useless, especially since many teams would kill to have a No. 2 starter like Gallardo, but for every step forward (reducing his control issues), there's a step back as he's not striking out as many batters as he once was. Jimenez struggled earlier this season, starting off with a 5.86 ERA in his first nine starts, but has posted a 2.52 ERA in eight starts since. But the attention will be on Francisco Rodriguez Thursday night, as the new Brewer is expected to be in uniform. Will he receive a save chance? Unlikely, but he could make an appearance in the game. Brewers vs. Rockies, 8:40 p.m. ET (Watch live)

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Posted on: June 27, 2011 9:54 am
Edited on: June 27, 2011 10:31 am
 

Pepper: Is the trade deadline too soon?

By C. Trent Rosecrans


BASEBALL TODAY: Are the Nationals headed in the right direction with Davey Johnson? MLB.com's Tom Bororstein joins Lauren Shihadi to discuss the Nationals, as well as the upcoming Reds-Rays series, the Indians-Diamondbacks and more.

PUSH IT BACK: In a month, we here at Eye On Baseball will be churning out rumors and speculation left and right -- who has interest in whom, which team is a buyer and which is a seller and what backup second baseman has some trade value. It's part of the baseball calendar, the last weekend of July. But is that too early?

Tim Sullivan of the San Diego Union-Tribune says it is, and I'm not sure he's wrong.

The nonwaiver trade deadline is at the two-thirds mark of the season, and that may be too soon for teams to decide just exactly what their chances are to make the best decision about folding or going all in on a postseason run.

The best reason to change it is that it forces too many teams -- especially those without a high payroll flexibility -- to give up too soon. Who wants to pay to see 25 games or so to see a team that has given up hope? Push the trade deadline back and lie to us a little longer, we like that.

NEW YORK TRADE TIME?: Could this be the year the Mets and Yankees make a big trade with each other? The two teams have only made nine trades with each other in their history. It's unlikely Jose Reyes will go across town, but Francisco Rodriguez, Carlos Beltran, Jason Isringhausen and Tim Byrdak could help the Yankees. [Wall Street Journal]

STRETCHING PINEDA: While nobody gave it any consideration when Michael Pineda broke the Mariners' camp in the rotation, it's now going to become an issue -- will the Mariners allow the rookie starter to add innings to his arm if the Mariners stick in the American League West race?

Seattle manager Eric Wedge says the team has a plan, not just for Pineda but the team's other pitchers as well, to try to limit innings, but still have his starters ready for September. The biggest thing is not limiting innings, but his game-to-game pitch count, Wedge said. [Seattle Times]

BARNEY SAYS IT GETS BETTER: Cubs rookie Darwin Barney not only participated in the "It Gets Better" project aimed at gay teens, but also said he was "honored" to ask. A cool deal for both Barney and an ever better deal for the campaign started by Cubs fan Dan Savage. The Giants have also shot a spot for the project. [Chicago Tribune]

HARANG STILL OUT: Padres starter Aaron Harang is unlikely to return from a stress fracture in his right foot until after the All-Star break. Harang leads the Padres' staff with a 7-2 record and 3.71 ERA. He's been on the DL since June 13. [San Diego Union-Tribune]

SORIA BACK: Since being reinstated as the Royals' closer, Joakim Soria hasn't allowed a run in 10 games (12 innings). He's only allowed four hits and two walks while striking out 12 and notching six saves. [Kansas City Star]

WE'RE GOING STREAKING!: Who is the streakiest team in baseball? Beyondtheboxscore.com has done the math and it's the Boston Red Sox. The least streaky? Well, that would be the consistently bad Chicago Cubs. The Cubs, amazingly enough, haven't won three games in a row all season.

JENKS BACK SOON: Red Sox reliever Bobby Jenks is expected to join the team Monday in Philadelphia and could be activated on Tuesday. [Boston Herald]

Marlins STILL WOOING BIG NAMES: Nobody expects Jack McKeon to manager the Marlins next season. Florida hired its interim manager after last season and look at how that turned out. Apparently owner Jeffrey Loria wants a big-name manager, and that's likely Bobby Valentine or Ozzie Guillen. [Palm Beach Post]

BYRD'S FACEMASK: Bringing flashbacks of Terry Steinbach, Cubs outfielder Marlon Byrd will wear a helmet with extra protection in his rehab start at Triple-A Iowa. Byrd was hit in the face last month and suffered facial fractures. [Chicago Tribune]

FINDING NIMMO: The Mets made Brandon Nimmo the first-ever first-round draft pick from the state of Wyoming. Wyoming hasn't had a first-rounder before because of its combination of low population and harsh climate. Nimmo's dad, Ron, has helped on both causes, raising his sons there and building a barn where they could hone their baseball skills year-round. [New York Post]

CHANGEUP PITCHES: The Brewers want right-hander Yovani Gallardo to throw more changeups. Gallardo is 9-4 with a 3.92 ERA this season, but is throwing the changeup just 1.6 percent of the time and none in his last two starts. The Brewers believe the pitch could help him lower his pitch counts and go deeper into games. [MLB.com]

HANLEY TO STAY AT CLEANUP: The Marlins new regime is going to continue using shortstop Hanley Ramirez as the team's cleanup hitter. Ramirez was hitting .200/.298/.295 overall when he was put in the fourth spot by new manager Jack McKeon and in five games in that spot, he's hitting .400/.429/.450 with four RBI, raising his overall line to .218/.309/.309. [Palm Beach Post]

SMALL GESTURE, BIG DEAL: Phil Rogers of the Chicago Tribune writes a really neat tale of Curt Schilling and a World War II veteran who recently passed away.

ROSE BRINGS 'EM IN: There's apparently not a whole lot going on in the greater Bristol area of Virginia and Tennessee, because Pete Rose is bringing in the fans. No, not the Hit King, but Pete Rose Jr., manager of the Bristol White Sox of the short-season Class A Appalachian League. Still, it's cool Rose is chasing his dream. If there's one thing when you look at his career path, he may not have his father's talent, but he does have his drive. [Bristol Herald Courier]

THIS IS WRONG: That's it. Just wrong. [Yahoo!'s Big League Stew]

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: June 19, 2011 11:29 pm
Edited on: June 19, 2011 11:32 pm
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Walk-off homer edition



By Matt Snyder

Cord Phelps, Indians. The home town fans had to wait through a nearly two hour rain delay and then until the 11th inning, but the rookie second baseman sent them home happy. Phelps launched a Tim Wood pitch into the right-center field seats for a game-winning, three-run home run. It was the first home run of his career, so perhaps he has a flair for the dramatic. He also doubled and scored in the second inning. The win kept the Indians in first place, a game ahead of the Tigers, and helped them to complete a series sweep for the first time since taking three from the Reds May 20-22.

Skip Schumaker, Cardinals. Like Phelps, Schumaker's walk-off home run was a first. While it was the 22nd home run of his career, it was the first against a left-handed pitcher. The shot came a half-inning after Cardinals closer Fernando Salas blew a save -- by allowing Alcides Escobar to hit his first homer of the season -- and one batter after Daniel Descalso was hosed at second when he tried to stretch a single into a double against Jeff Francoeur. Schumaker also had a go-ahead RBI single in the sixth, when he entered as a pinch hitter. The win marks the Cardinals' second in a row after a seven-game losing streak and moved them back into a tie with the Brewers atop the NL Central.

Jason Vargas, Mariners. All he did was go out and spin the best start of his career against the MLB-best Phillies Sunday. Vargas threw a three-hit shutout while walking two and striking out six. He really settled in late, as the only baserunner for the Phillies after the fourth inning was Ryan Howard, who singled in the ninth. Don't look now, but the Mariners -- who almost everyone pegged to finish last this season -- are only a half-game out of first place in the AL West.




Brewers pitching staff. The Brewers have coughed up at least 10 runs in three of their past four games. Worse yet, Shaun Marcum left after the first inning with an injury Friday night and Yovani Gallardo was touched up for nine hits and five earned runs in three innings Sunday. The bullpen wasn't much better, giving up five hits, two walks and four earned runs in five innings. The Brewers have now lost five of seven since sweeping the Cardinals and are tied for first place with those same Cardinals -- despite the Cards recently having lost seven straight.

Yorvit Torrealba, Rangers. The Rangers' backstop had a rough third inning. He committed two errors and probably should have prevented Alexi Ogando's wild pitch from getting by him. The Braves plated two unearned runs that inning, which ended up being the difference in a 4-2 Rangers loss. Torrealba was then pulled from the game, though it was reportedly because he was "out of gas" instead of being pulled for the poor defense.

The Florida Marlins. Manager resigns. Club loses 10th straight game. Club is 1-18 in June. Not that there's any shame in this one, but James Shields has started twice against the Marlins and pitched 18 innings without allowing a single earned run. Logan Morrison tweeted "uncle" after the game. Hanley Ramirez still can't hit. We could go on and on, but it's unnecessary. It's just an all-around mess. Jack McKeon must really love managing baseball teams -- of course, in his defense, things can't get any worse.

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Posted on: June 7, 2011 10:31 am
Edited on: June 7, 2011 11:25 am
 

Looking back at second-round picks

Joey Votto

By C. Trent Rosecrans


While the first-round of the MLB Draft is gaining more attention in the last couple of years, the later rounds are where most of the work is done. 

The second round starts today at 11 a.m. ET, so here's a look at some of the best second-round picks in recent memory.

Angels: In 1999, the Angels took John Lackey out of Grayson County Community College with the 68th overall pick in the draft. In 1995, they took Jarrod Washburn with the first pick of the second round.

Astros: Perhaps the team's best player right now, outfielder Hunter Pence, was the 64th overall pick in 2004. 

MLB Draft

Athletics: The A's took Vista, Calif., high schooler Trevor Cahill with the 66th overall pick in 2006. Two years before that they took Kurt Suzuki in the second round and in 2003 they took Andre Ethier in the second round. They traded him for Milton Bradley and Antonio Perez in 2005.

Blue Jays: Right-hander Dave Bush in 2002 is probably the team's best second-round pick since taking Derek Bell in 1987.

Brian McCannBraves: Current first baseman Freddie Freeman was selected with the 78th overall pick in 2007, but the best pick was easily 2002's No. 64 overall pick, a local high school catcher named Brian McCann.

Brewers: The Brewers took Yovani Gallardo with the fifth pick of the second round in 2004.

Cardinals: In 2001, the team took Dan Haren with the 72nd overall pick. More recently, Jon Jay was taken in the second round of the 2006 draft.

Cubs: You have to go back pretty far -- unless you go with Bobby Hill -- to find much success with the Cubs' second-round pick, but if you go as far back as 1984, they took Greg Maddux with the third pick of the second round and he turned out OK. Also among their second-round picks is former Dallas Cowboys quarterback Quincy Carter (1996).

Diamondbacks: A's starter Brett Anderson was Arizona's second-rounder in 2006. He was part of the big trade that send Dan Haren to the Diamondbacks.

Dodgers: The Dodgers got future closer Jonathan Broxton with the 60th overall pick in 2002.

Giants: Of recent vintage, the Giants have taken Nate Schierholtz in 2003 and Fred Lewis in 2002, but the most interesting second-round pick by San Francisco was in 1982. That year they took the son of a team legend with the 11th pick of the second round (39th overall), but Barry Bonds went to Arizona State instead.

Indians: Jason Kipnis is one of the team's top prospects, taken in the second round in 2009. In 1995, the Indians took first baseman Sean Casey out of Richmond with the 53rd overall pick.

Mariners: Recently-demoted Orioles starter Chris Tillman was taken in the second round of the 2006 draft. Keep an eye on 2009 second-rounder Rich Poythress, who had 31 homers in Class A last season.

Mike StantonMarlins: It wasn't until the 12th pick of the second round -- and 76th overall -- for someone to pick up Mike Stanton in 2007. 

Mets: There's some slim pickins for the Mets recently, but few Mets fans would trade their second-rounder of 1977, Mookie Wilson. (Seriously, this one was tough, the only players the Mets have picked in the last 15 years who have made the majors were Kevin Mulvey, Neal Musser, Pat Strange and Tyler Walker -- maybe that explains some things.)

Nationals (Expos): Jordan Zimmermann was the team's second-rounder in 2007. Current Reds All-Star second baseman Brandon Phillips was taken by the Expos with the sixth pick of the second round in 1999.

Orioles: Nolan Reimold was taken 61st overall in 2005, but if you want to go back a few years, the team took Cal Ripken with the 22nd pick of the second round in the 1978 draft. Ripken was the third of four picks the Orioles had in the second round that year.

Padres: San Diego took Chase Hedley in 2005.

Phillies: Jimmy Rollins was the team's second-rounder in 1996, going 46th overall.

Pirates: Last year's pick was Stetson Allie, who many expected to go in the first round. Lefty Tom Gorzelanny was taken in the second round in 2003 and catcher Ryan Doumit was taken 59th overall in 1999.

Rangers: The only player taken by the Rangers in the second round of the last decade to make the majors is Jason Bourgeois.

Rays: The Rays famously took Josh Hamilton No. 1 overall in 1999, but their second-round pick that year was pretty good too -- Carl Crawford.

Red Sox: How about Justin Masterson (2006), Dustin Pedroia (2004) and Jon Lester (2002)?

Reds: NL MVP Joey Votto (2002) was the third pick of the second round (44th overall) and Travis Wood was taken in the second round of the 2005 draft. Keep an eye on 2009 pick Billy Hamilton, who already has 45 stolen bases this season for Class A Dayton.

Rockies: For recent vintage, Seth Smith (2004) is the pick, but you can go back a few years and pick Aaron Cook (1997).

George BrettRoyals: For all the prospects the Royals have stockpiled in the last couple of years, strangely not too many are second-rounders. Outfielder Brett Eibner (2010) was the only member of the Royals' Top 10 by Baseball America taken in the second round. You have to go back to Carlos Beltran (1995), Jon Lieber (1992), Bob Hamelin (1988), Mark Gubicza (1981), Darryl Motley (1978) and Dennis Leonard (1972) to find serious big-leaguers. Oh, and also a kid out of El Segundo, Calif., in 1971 named George Brett. He was pretty good, too.

Tigers: The Tigers took Brandon Inge with the 14th pick of the 1998 draft as a catcher out of Virginia Commonwealth. In 1976, Alan Trammell was the second pick of the round.

Twins: A nice run of arms earlier in the decade with Kevin Slowey (2005), Anthony Swarzak (2004), Scott Baker (2003) and Jesse Crain (2002). Frank Viola was the team's second-rounder in 1981.

White Sox: A's outfielder Ryan Sweeney (2003) is the team's best second-rounder since Bob Wickman (1990) -- not counting Jeff Weaver, who went back to school after he was picked in 1997 and was taken by the Tigers a year later.

Yankees: In the last 20 years, only two Yankees second-rounders have made the big leagues, Shelley Duncan (2001) and Randy Keisler (1998). Catching prospect Austin Romine was the team's second-rounder in 2007. In 1982, the team did take a shortstop from McAdory High School in Bessemer, Ala., who went on to play football at Auburn instead. His name is Bo Jackson. That was the year after the team took Stanford outfielder John Elway.

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Posted on: May 7, 2011 5:59 pm
Edited on: May 8, 2011 12:16 am
 

No-hitter watch: Yovani Gallardo baffles Cards

By Evan Brunell

GallardoUPDATE: Gallardo ended up pitching eight strong and one-hitting the Cardinals in a beautiful effort that could represent a turning of the corner. Watch out for Milwaukee -- once Gallardo, Greinke and Marcum get going, this will be a team that rockets up the standings.


UPDATE: A valiant effort by Craig Counsell is wasted as Gallardo gave up a groundball single to Daniel Descalso to snap the no-hitter on the first batter of the eighth. Gallardo may not be long for the game as the Brew Crew now has someone warming.


Yovani Gallardo has a no-hitter through seven innings against the Cardinals just a day after Jamie Garcia took a perfect game into the eighth for St. Louis. Gallardo will face the bottom third of the order to start the eighth. He converted a double play to end the seventh in strong fashion.

Gallardo's revenge isn't as impressive, as he's coughed up four walks on the game. Still, no hits is rather impressive. He's also struck out five Cardinals and has tossed 104 pitches. He'll need to be efficient the rest of the way to avoid racking up a high pitch count but is no stranger to pitch counts over 100 -- all but one of his starts have cracked triple digits, topping out with 113 against the Reds on April 22. 

Regardless of whether or not he locks up the no-hitter, Gallardo's start is extremely encouraging after coming into the game with a 6.10 ERA in seven starts. The righty was expected to pair with Zack Greinke and Shaun Marcum to form a dominating trio but has struggled to meet expectations thus far. He went 14-7 with a 3.84 ERA in 41 1/3 innings.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed. 

Posted on: April 30, 2011 1:12 am
Edited on: April 30, 2011 1:17 am
 

Greinke appears on target to start next week

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Zack GreinkeZack Greinke made what may have been his final minor-league rehab start on Friday, allowing seven hits and two runs in five innings for Triple-A Nashville against Albuquerque.

Greinke threw 75 pitches, 50 for strikes. He walked one and struck out seven against the Dodgers' Triple-A affiliate.

It was Greinke's third rehab start out of what was scheduled to be three starts in the minors.

"I know he's looking forward to this being his last one there," Brewers manager Ron Roenicke told MLB.com before the Brewers' game with the Astros. "Hopefully, it's a good outing that he gets a lot of innings in. To get up and down is what's important. I hope he doesn't run through his pitch count to where he's not getting up and down a lot.

The Brewers are looking at starting him either Wednesday or Thursday in Atlanta, limiting to 90 pitches in that outing. Wednesday would be five days rest, but Thursday would set up the rest of the team's rotation, and find a way to put Yovani Gallardo between the team's two left-handed starters, Chris Narveson and Randy Wolf.

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Posted on: April 28, 2011 11:12 am
 

Gallardo struggling for Brewers

By Matt Snyder

Back on April 5, Yovani Gallardo spun a brilliant one-hit shutout against the Braves to give the Brewers their first win of the season. Through two outings, his season ERA sat at 1.20 and he looked well on the way to improving upon his very solid 2010 campaign.

Since then, however, Gallardo has been sub-par at best and pretty bad at times. He hasn't worked into the seventh inning since then, but that's not especially awful since he's finished at least five innings in all four subsequent outings. It's that he's been getting knocked around the park that poses a potential issue. He's allowed at least seven hits and four runs in each of those four outings. In full, he's got an 8.86 ERA and a WHIP over 2.00 in those four starts. While it's a small sample, it's also four straight starts where he's failed to record a quality start. That's at least cause for a pause.

His lasted five innings in his latest outing and allowed 10 hits, six earned runs and three walks. He allowed a home run and only struck out three. Afterward, Gallardo didn't really have an explanation for his slump.

"I wish I could tell you. I don't know," he said. "I feel fine. I think it's just a matter of finding a rhythm, I guess. I felt a lot better there as the game went on, after that first inning, just making pitches. Obviously we all know it hasn't been a good start for me, the past 3-4 starts, but I've just got to keep moving forward."

Manager Ron Roenicke had a few ideas.

"I got more concerned today, because I didn’t think he had his stuff," Roenicke said. "That’s the first time, I think, he’s gone out there without good stuff. I think the last three outings where good stuff but no command. Today he didn’t have his command or his stuff." (Journal-Sentinel )

The numbers bear out a loss of stuff. Gallardo's strikeout rate is down significantly from last season. More advanced stats like batting average on balls in play and strand rate don't show huge discrepancies between last season and this one. He is allowing more home runs per fly ball, but the rise isn't to a huge percentage -- so it could easily be explained by a loss of good stuff. The sabermetric sweetheart FIP shows Gallardo has been having bad fortune, but it's still quite a bit bigger than last season's mark.

Simply put, Gallardo has struggled in the past four starts because he's not throwing the ball as well as he did last season and in the first two starts of this season. He most certainly can turn it around -- and probably will quite soon -- but if the bad starts continue to pile up, it's certainly a cause for concern in Milwaukee.

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Category: MLB
 
 
 
 
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