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Tag:Carl Pavano
Posted on: November 18, 2010 11:07 pm
 

Thursday evening 11/18 rumor roundup

Hot Stove League With the GM meetings over, things have settled down -- but only a little bit.
  • Want a young, cost-controllable starting pitcher? Yeah, who doesn't? That's why the Rockies have made Jhoulys Chacin off limits, so don't bother asking. Back up the Brinks truck for Tyler Matzek and Christian Friedrich too, says Troy Renck of the Denver Post .
  • Speaking of Renck, he reports that Jorge de la Rosa won't wait around for Cliff Lee to pick a destination. Yes, it reduces de la Rosa's leverage by not waiting, but if de la Rosa gets what he wants, the lefty will move quickly.
  • Junichi Tazawa paved the way for Japanese amateur ballplayers, and Kazuya Takano and Kazuki Nishijima are more than happy with that paving as the two have joined the Dodgers organization, reports the Los Angeles Times .
  • Evan had Carl Pavano heading to the Brewers in his free-agent prediction piece . Uh, not so much, as the Brewers will look for pitching through trades and not free agency as Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports reveals.

    But not so fast. Cafardo reveals that the Brewers and Nationals are the frontrunners for Pavano. Who to believe...
  • Sean McAdam of CSNNE.com brings Red Sox goodness, noting that Marco Scutaro could be traded with six teams interested. Boston wants middle relief for Scoot. You have to think that if Scutaro walks, the Red Sox would install Jed Lowrie at shortstop and stop this Lowrie-at-third foolishness.
  • Oh, and closer Jonathan Papelbon wants a $2.15 million raise to $12.5 million as Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe writes. Only in baseball can you get a multimillion dollar raise for your worst year yet. But Papelbon will be getting a raise, and continue to be one of the more overpaid closers in the game.
  • The Nationals seem unlikely to offer outfielder Josh Willingham a contract extension. Among one of the better sluggers in the game, Willingham will command a pricey extension and Washington doesn't seem terribly interested in entertaining that notion -- or even having Willingham on the team. A source tells MLB.com that Willingham will be moved before the 2011 season.

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 17, 2010 8:59 pm
Edited on: November 18, 2010 5:47 am
 

Wednesday evening rumor roundup

Hot Stove Wednesday wasn't quite as exciting as Tuesday's rumor-mongering at the GM meetings, but hey, we did get a trade and an overpaid free agent signing, so it wasn't all that different. Here's some of the other stuff that went down -- or has been talked about -- 'round Orlando and beyond.

• The Rockies are interested in Jon Garland, but aren't looking to offer much beyond a one-year deal. (Sports Illustrated 's Jon Heyman via Twitter )

• The Nationals are one of "six or eight" teams to have talked with Twins free agent starter Carl Pavano. (Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post )

• The Brewers hope to extend second baseman Rickie Weeks, who will be a free agent following the 2011 season. (Tom Haudricourt of the Journal Sentinel )

• Jorge de la Rosa will move quickly on signing, preferably signing before the Cliff Lee sweepstakes is wrapped up. He'll jump on an offer from the Nationals or Pirates if the terms are right. (Troy Renck of the Denver Post )

• The Rockies have been aggressive in Orlando with trades and free agents. The team has interest in Oakland third baseman Kevin Kouzmanoff. (Renck via Twitter)

• Miguel Olivo is drawing interest from the Rangers, White Sox and Blue Jays. (FOXSports.com's Jon Paul Morosi )

• The White Sox are interested in Hideki Matsui and Johnny Damon to fill their need of a left-handed hitter, but aren't expected to make a move until after the Dec. 2 non-tender date. (Chicago Tribune 's Phil Rogers )

• The Phillies have done "extensive" groundwork on a deal for the White Sox's Carlos Quentin, who would replace Jayson Werth. (ESPN.com's Jayson Stark )

• Oakland, Toronto and Colorado have interest in Kansas City's Alex Gordon. (MLB.com's Dick Kaegel )

• Tsuyoshi Nishioka was officially posted on Wednesday (U.S. time), so the bidding will close at 5 p.m. Eastern on Tuesday. The Giants, Twins, Cardinals, Orioles, Mariners, Padres, Diamondbacks, Dodgers and Red Sox have all been mentioned by Japanese media as teams with interest. (YakyuBaka.com )

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.


Posted on: November 3, 2010 11:25 am
Edited on: November 4, 2010 9:01 pm
 

Predicting where free agents will land

Baseball is currently in a five-day period where teams have exclusivity to negotiate with players who have become free agents. Sunday at midnight, that period will expire and free up players to talk to any and all teams.

There's plenty to like about this free-agent crop, as the top players at each position is enough to put together a contending team. Plus, there are a good number of nice backup options, too.

Below, you can find Evan Brunell's predictions on where free agents will wind up, going position by position with two names at each position.

Martinez C: Victor Martinez -- Tigers. All the noise surrounding Detroit going hard after Martinez seems legit. It's part of Detroit's M.O., filling a position of desperate need to contend and Martinez is the best option and remains capable of catching. Plus, Detroit has no major block at first or DH for an eventual switch for V-Mart as Alex Avila apprentices.

C: John Buck -- Yankees. Jorge Posada will be receiving most of his at-bats as a DH and Francisco Cervelli certainly can't start. The Yankees will flex their financial muscles on a catcher which they can bring in on a short-term contract who broke out in Toronto last season. It solves the catcher conundrum short term and leaves the long term free for Austin Romine.

Dunn 1B: Adam Dunn -- Cubs. Another popular pairing that makes too much sense. The Cubs need to strike to stay in contention even as they try to get their minor-league system in order and producing over the next couple of seasons. Dunn's defense is minimized now that he's at first, and the Cubs need someone to sky them big flies. (And if the Cubs really are not going after big-name free agents , which I doubt is 100 percent true, I'll tab Dunn to the Athletics .)

1B: Aubrey Huff -- Giants. Unfortunately, while bringing in Huff eventually paid off big time for San Francisco, he is now overrated. With Brandon Belt tearing up the farm, there's no overwhelming reason to give Huff anything close to what he can get on the market. I have a feeling Brian Sabean will do what he always does, signing older players coming off big years to nonsensical contracts. You know it and I know it. Sleeper alert: The Giants move forward with a Mark DeRosa/Travis Ishikawa platoon at first, leaving Huff to land with the Mariners .

Hudson 2B: Orlando Hudson -- Padres. The O-Dog will be on the move again, looking for his fourth team in four seasons, fifth overall. He's long wanted to join the Mets, but Luis Castillo has prevented him from doing so. The Padres plan to contend, but still need the dollars to make sense for who they bring in, and it will for Hudson to plug a vacancy at second with no viable internal options.

2B: Bill Hall -- Twins. Hall is looking for a starting job, but there are those telling him he is best suited as a super utility player. Look for Minnesota to give him a chance at the starting 2B job, but the Twins will love moving him around once they can justify it.

Jeter SS: Derek Jeter -- Yankees. I think a lot of people are going to be a bit surprised by how long the negotiations take. Despite popular sentiment, Brian Cashman is not one to pay someone beyond actual value. What he does have is disposable income that the owners can order him to pay a premium, so Cashman will do just that -- but only at a small premium.

SS: Juan Uribe -- Giants. This is one return that makes sense. Edgar Renteria isn't being brought back, even if he doesn't retire. Pablo Sandoval's struggles at third and Uribe's ability to slide to third as need be will be coveted by San Francisco, and he deserves the deal he'll sign for. It's a very weak market for shortstops, so even those that could be available in a trade (Jason Bartlett?) may have too prohibitive a price.

Beltre 3B: Adrian Beltre -- Angels. Los Angeles makes the big strike here, importing a gifted defender who had a great season with the stick. He won't hit .321 again, but he'll be a signing on the level of Torii Hunter. He's expensive but will produce and help put L.A. back into postseason contention.

3B: Miguel Tejada -- Padres. San Diego was pleased with Tejada's production after acquiring him from Houston and will sign him to play his natural position of short even though he began the transition to third base last season.

Crawford LF: Carl Crawford -- Red Sox . Crawford will spark a bidding war between the Red Sox, Angels and some other team yet to be known, plus a late charge by the Yankees (you know it'll happen). In the end, the Red Sox will win out, offering just enough to entice Crawford to Boston.

LF: Marcus Thames -- Phillies. Thames built his value this past year, establishing himself as a strong platoon option against left-handers who surprisingly held his own against righties. The Phillies are interested in bringing in another right-handed hitter to pair with Ben Francisco, and Thames seems like the perfect low-cost, high-upside option.

Damon CF: Johnny Damon -- Astros. Damon may be a center fielder, but it's in name only as he's restricted to left and DH at this point of his career. No contending team is going to be interested in starting him, but he can still land somewhere where there's a faint glimmer of a chance at the postseason. Damon can be the grizzled, scrappy veteran who can lead them to the top. Welcome to Houston, Johnny!

CF: Melky Cabrera -- Royals. Cabrera's stock is down. Way, way down. He'll have to latch on with a bottom-feeding club who gambles on his tools. Kansas City seems like the perfect place to do that. With an up-and-coming farm, he could fit in seamlessly if he takes his job seriously. If he doesn't, the Royals simply move on.

Werth RF: Jayson Werth -- White Sox. It makes a lot of sense for the White Sox to go after Werth -- they have their own bandbox and need someone who can play the outfield and who could DH in his off days. Carlos Quentin's defense needs to be hidden or moved to first if they don't bring Paul Konerko back. Helping matters is Chicago has the money to make it happen.

RF: Andruw Jones -- Braves. Coming off a strong season for the White Sox where he proved he can still bring it, just not quite as a full-time outfielder (although that possibility does exist), Jones seems like he could make a return to Atlanta. The Braves have a need to remake their outfield, and Jones seems to be a perfect piece of the puzzle.

Thome DH: Jim Thome -- Twins. No reason for Thome to leave the Twins, really. He had a strong season there, became a cult hero, has been loyal to his teams and Minnesota definitely could use this slugger back provided the two can agree on how much playing time he will get. Having Delmon Young, Denard Span, Michael Cuddyer, Jason Kubel and Justin Morneau doesn't leave much room for Thome, but it worked out just fine in 2010.

DH: Manny Ramirez -- Rays . Manny is a DH and probably will find the market a bit hostile towards him. He's not upper-echelon any longer, but not many teams need a DH. After long and overdrawn-out negotiations thanks to Scott Boras, ManRam will finally sign around the beginning of spring training and coast into town to help the Rays and what could be a moribund offense.

Pavano RHSP: Carl Pavano -- Brewers. Pavano is set to cash in on his success with the Twins and is certain to be in a position where he can outdo accepting arbitration thanks to a poor right-handed starter's market. Milwaukee needs to find starting pitching and fast, and the Brewers proved last year with Randy Wolf they weren't afraid to go get it. Wolf's struggles won't be enough to deter Milwaukee from Pavano, not when a Wolf-Pavano-Yovani Gallardo rotation would do wonders in the NL Central.

RHSP: Hiroki Kuroda -- Dodgers. Kuroda's been a bit overlooked on the national stage, as he truly is a strong pitcher. The Dodgers want -- need -- to contend, so they'll make sure Kuroda goes nowhere. They do need to slash salary, but a lot of that was tied up in Manny Ramirez, so there's plenty for Kuroda.

Lee LHSP: Cliff Lee -- Rangers. Buy into Texas being players for Lee and Lee eschewing the bright lights of New York just as long as the money is there. And it will be. The wife likes having him close to home, he's going to be on a contending team and get his money. There isn't much reason to move to New York.

LHSP: Jorge De La Rosa -- Tigers. Detroit has money to spend and a need in the rotation. De la Rosa will flirt with quite a few teams, Yankees included, but it's Detroit who will step up. It needs a strong pitcher in the rotation to have any hope of contending, and de la Rosa falls right into the bracket the Tigers are comfortable with.

Soriano RHRP: Rafael Soriano -- Angels . L.A. has said all the right things in moving forward with Fernando Rodney as a closer after moving Brian Fuentes, but the Angels bullpen was in tatters all season and Rodney is not good enough to block Soriano, who is one of the best closers in the game but will find a rough market.

RHRP: Joaquin Benoit -- Rays . Benoit's price tag is going to be high, but the Rays will be faced with a barren bullpen. Why not bring back someone they know can do it for them? They can entice Benoit with the possibility -- probability -- about taking over as closer.

LHRP: Scott Downs -- Red Sox. Downs is a Type-A free agent, but Boston will gladly fork over its second-rounder after Crawford gives Tampa Bay its first-rounder. The Red Sox want to beef up their bullpen after years of trolling through cast-offs. Downs has been coveted for a while, and Boston will take the plunge.

LHRP: Brian Fuentes -- Marlins. Florida wants to contend, but needs some help in the bullpen to do so. Knowing the Fish, they won't be looking to spend big at the position, but Fuentes is a nice, safe and affordable pick to be the new closer they want.

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: October 5, 2010 1:49 pm
Edited on: October 5, 2010 1:50 pm
 

Twins announce rotation

So, to go along with the Yankees rotation, we now have the Twins rotation for their ALDS matchups:

Game 1: CC Sabathia vs. Francisco Liriano
Game 2: Andy Pettitte vs. Carl Pavano
Game 3: Phil Hughes vs. Brian Duensing
Game 4: Sabathia vs. Nick Blackburn
Game 5: Pettitte vs. Liriano

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .
Posted on: September 22, 2010 2:00 pm
Edited on: September 22, 2010 2:38 pm
 

Twins set postseason rotation

Francisco Liriano The Twins have not only set their place in the playoffs, manager Ron Gardenhire has set his postseason rotation.

For now, he told reporters, it will be Francisco Liriano, Carl Pavano, Brian Duensing and Nick Blackburn in the playoffs, but could change if someone pitches poorly down the stretch, according to the Star Tribune 's La Velle E. Neal III .

Pavano will also get a little more rest. He'll start again on Saturday -- eight days after his last start, Thursday in Chicago.

Pavano is leading the team in wins with a 17-11 record and a 3.60 ERA, while the lefty Liriano has a better winning percentage (.636, 14-8) and lower ERA (3.44).

Kevin Slowey is the odd man out, despite going 5-1 with a 2.72 ERA and .216 batting average against in his last nine starts. Blackburn, who is today's starter for the Twins, has pitched in six games since a monthlong demotion to Triple-A and has gone 2-3 with a  2.09 ERA and a .216 batting average against.

 -- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .





Posted on: September 17, 2010 6:49 pm
 

Konerko OK, says situation was handled correctly

Paul Konerko The odd codes of baseball were on display Thursday night in Chicago -- Carl Pavano accidentally hit Paul Konerko in the face with a pitch, setting off a chain reaction of baseball logic and justice.

Konerko, knowing it wasn't intentional and being pretty darn tough, got up and went to first -- only to retaliate by homering in his next at-bat.

Before Konerko had his chance to respond with the homer, White Sox starter Mark Buehrle decided he needed to intentionally hit the Twins' first batter, Michael Cuddyer, because the Twins accidentally hit his player. Cuddyer, apparently, understood and just took his base. Does all that seem right?

In baseball world, it was.

"I think everybody handled it right," Konerko told the Chicago Tribune . "Mike Cuddyer was perfect. He knows the game. Everybody involved in that little situation last night handled it perfectly. Unfortunately, you don't see that too much nowadays. The umpires handled it perfectly as well."

As if his homer wasn't proof enough that he was fine, Konerko said he was OK a day later, suffering from just a fat lip and a sore nose.

"Any time you get hit up in that area, your first thought is the eye," Konerko said. "You want to make sure both your eyes are OK, or at least your left one. After that, just checking my teeth and after that, everything is kinda replaceable."

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .


Posted on: September 16, 2010 9:32 pm
Edited on: September 17, 2010 1:34 am
 

Konerko gets payback

Paul Konerko Unlike Derek Jeter, there was little little doubt Paul Konerko was hit on Thursday. In the first inning, Twins starter Carl Pavano hit Konerko in the face.

Konerko was examined and stayed int he game. In his next at-bat, he homered, cutting a Twins lead to 3-1.

The White Sox retaliated, as Mark Buehrle hit Michael Cuddyer in the back on the first pitch of the second inning, prompting home plate umpire Jerry Crawford to issue warnings to both teams. The Twins then made the Sox pay, as Cuddyer scored on back-to-back singles to start a three-run inning.

UPDATE: Following the Twins' 8-5 victory, White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen made the case for keeping the free-agent-to-be with Chicago.

"I hope my players, not just White Sox players -- look themselves in the mirror and see what this guy did," Guillen told the Chicago Tribune . "This guy has a chance to be the MVP. Great numbers, great career. Stepped it up like a man and played the game. That's something a lot of people got to look themselves in the mirror, and you're going to grow up with somebody, and you're going to grow up with a guy like that, you're going to come out as a good ballplayer."

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .

Posted on: August 1, 2010 10:28 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 12:28 pm
 

Trade market still open


Adam Dunn Everyone refers to the last day of July as the "trade deadline" even if it's not exactly accurate. It's officially the "non-waiver trade deadline" and that first part may not roll off the tongue, but it's important. It's the reason why one of the most speculated-about players at the deadline, Adam Dunn, told me July 31 "doesn't mean [anything]" to him.

Dunn should know, in the last year of a two-year deal, Dunn's movement will be speculated upon throughout the next month. He also knows from experience, two years ago the Reds traded him to Arizona after the non-waiver trade deadline.

Waivers are certainly a complication, but deals still get done until the end of the month, when a player has to be on the roster to be eligible for the postseason. So how does it work?

First, most teams put most -- if not all -- their players through the waiver process since you don't have to give up a player who is claimed, you can just pull him off waivers.

Unclaimed players can be traded to any team. Claimed players can be kept, traded or just handed over to the claiming team for nothing but salary relief. That's what happened last year when the Blue Jays put him on waivers, the White Sox claimed him and Toronto was happy to shed his remaining five years for $59.7 million on his contract. So, if some team wanted to claim Carlos Zambrano or Kosuke Fukudome or Alfonso Soriano, the Cubs would likely dance for joy. But that's unlikely to happen (even though I would have said the same thing a year ago about Rios).

Now, if just one team claims a player, he can be dealt only to that team. If more than one team claims a player, he can be traded to the team with the worst record in his league that claims him. If no team in the same league claims the player, but more than one team in the other league claims him, he can be traded to the team with the worst record.

So now with the process out of the way, it's good to keep in mind that this isn't an unusual process. Last season Scott Kazmir, Jim Thome, Carl Pavano, Alex Gonzalez, Brad Penny, Aubrey Huff, Billy Wagner, Jon Garland and Ivan Rodriguez. So who could that be this year?

Obviously, Dunn is still out there. He realizes the real trade deadline is at the end of this month, not the beginning. If the Nationals can't agree to an extension, the Nationals need to get something for Dunn. Based on many of the rumors that were out there, it was hardly surprising he wasn't dealt. Nationals GM Mike Rizzo was asking for the moon and nobody was willing to spend the money to get there. White Sox GM Kenny Williams hasn't exactly hidden his desire for Dunn, and a little thing like waivers won't stop him. However, he'll have to hope nearly the rest of the teams pass on the big man, and that's not likely.

The biggest name that could move would be Manny Ramirez. The Dodgers don't know what they're going to get out of him and could shed roughly $7 million. As CBSSports.com senior writer Scott Miller notes , Ramirez has a full no-trade clause, but would likely waive that to go to the American League and DH. If the White Sox can't get Dunn, Ramirez may be a solid backup option -- albeit a bit expensive.

Andy LaRoche Diamondbacks first baseman Adam LaRoche has a mutual option for 2011 that increases to $9.5 million if he's traded, though the buyout remains at $1.5 million. Kelly Johnson may not get through waivers, but could still be traded. He's arbitration eligible after the season.

The Royals would certainly love for another team to take Jose Guillen and what's left of the $12 million salary for this season. Guillen is a free agent after the season.

Mike Lowell is still -- sorta -- with the Red Sox, but would likely sail through waivers because he's owed the remainder of his $12 million salary this season and nobody's quite sure what they'll get out of him.

The reliever market didn't see much action on Saturday, but Toronto's Kevin Gregg, Seattle's David Aardsma and Colorado's Joe Beimel could be moved before the end of this month.

As for starters, Colorado's Aaron Cook is signed for $9.25 million next season with a mutual option of $11 million in 2012 and a $0.5 million buyout. His annual salary increases by $1 million for each season.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com