Tag:Mike Stanton
Posted on: February 28, 2011 6:42 pm
 

Stanton, Hart sidelined for 2 weeks

Posted by C. Trent Rosecrans

Mike StantonSpring is a time for minor injuries that could become bigger. For now, don't panic if you're a Marlins fan or Brewers fan... but don't totally dismiss spring injuries, some can linger all season. Both Marlins right fielder Mike Stanton and Brewers right fielder Corey Hart will miss the next two weeks.

Stanton suffered a strained right quad on Sunday and after the game told reporters he was out for two weeks. He told reporters on Monday that he felt better, but manager Edwin Rodriguez said the team will be very cautious with his return.

"He came in today, and he felt better," Rodriguez said, via MLB.com. "But still, it's too early to tell. The trainers are going to wait two or three more days to see how he feels. Then, he will have a better idea of how serious the injury is."

As for Hart, his injury may be more serious. Hart was hurt in a throwing drill on Saturday and will now spend the next two weeks resting a strained oblique muscle on his left side.

"[Dr. Craig Young] said we would probably push it a little harder if we were in the middle of the season, but there's no reason to push it right now," Hart said told MLB.com. "We're going to try easing in so we don't have any setbacks at all."

Oblique injuries have become more commonly diagnosed the last couple of years and have seemed to have be a lingering type thing. A big part of it is because that muscle is used in so many parts of baseball, from swinging to throwing and everything in-between. That said, it seems the Brewers are out in front of this one and hopefully it won't linger into the season.

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Posted on: February 27, 2011 7:25 pm
Edited on: February 27, 2011 7:26 pm
 

Getting to know the Marlins

By Evan Brunell

MVP
 

StantonFor the Marlins to reach the postseason, the team will rely on Mike Stanton to seamlessly step into the cleanup spot for his first full major league season and deliver on his 40-home run promise without also delivering on the chance he could rival Mark Reynolds for human windmill properties. Stanton bashed 22 home runs in just 359 plate appearances, so he could be a major cog in the Fish lineup that will be suffering without second baseman Dan Uggla and likely punting offense by going with rookie Matt Dominguez at the hot corner.

But how will Stanton respond to a new book on him and entire offseason for his rivals to prepare?

PLAYER ORACLE: Walt Weiss to Josh Johnson

  • Walt Weiss played with Wes Helms for the 1998 Atlanta Braves
  • Wes Helms played with Josh Johnson for the 2010 Florida Marlins
No matter if it's Walt Weiss, Chuck Carr, Jeff Conine, or Charlie Hough, a member of the 1993 Marlins is only one degree away from the 2011 squad.

POP CULTURE

One of the greatest movie trilogies of all time -- no discussion will be held on this matter -- is the Back to the Future trilogy. In the second movie, Marty McFly and Doc Brown head to the year 2015 (remember, the movie is set in 1985) to try to save ... well, we won't give the plot away here just in case there's someone who hasn't seen the movie in the 22 years it's been out. But the baseball connection comes with Marty learning in 2015 that the Cubs defeated the "Miami Gators" in the World Series.

While Back to the Future II got the name and league affiliation wrong, they did accurately forsee a team in Miami, as the Florida Marlins came into existence four years after the movie's release. And by the way, don't forget that the Marlins are changing their location name from Florida to Miami, so there actually will be a Miami squad in 2015. (And frankly, it's doubtful the Marlins would have ever become the Marlins if Back to the Future II had named the Gators the Marlins instead -- baseball wouldn't have wanted that to happen.)

It remains to be seen whether the Cubs prediction will come true. Here's betting not. 

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Category: MLB
Posted on: February 26, 2011 12:52 pm
Edited on: February 26, 2011 1:06 pm
 

Pepper: No Millwood for Cards?

Posted by Matt Snyder

Kevin Millwood
WAINWRIGHTED: Let's face it, things are kind of (read: really) slow during the early weeks of spring training. We've got beat writers tweeting play-by-play of intersquad scrimmages, people making fun of people overreacting to Tim Lincecum's outing (though, at this point, I'm not sure anyone takes these early outings seriously) and one of the biggest news stories is a free agent for next season.

So when a star starting pitcher goes down injured, the aftermath is sure to linger. To the point that Kevin Millwood is a wanted man.

And rightfully so.

The Cards appear to be dead-set on Kyle McClellan entering the rotation. Manager Tony La Russa looks at him as a "real weapon" (St. Louis Post-Dispatch ) and notes he's paid his dues. Which he kind of has, but the flipside is that, in the process, McClellan has become one of the better set up options in the majors. He posted a sparkling 2.27 ERA last season in 68 appearances. Removing him from the bullpen in favor of the rotation leaves a gaping hole in the late innings.

That is why plugging in a veteran like Millwood -- who Dave Duncan could surely make work -- seems like a logical move. Post-Dispatch writer Bernie Miklasz makes a really good case for Millwood. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch )

In other Cardinals' rotation news, it appears Chris Carpenter -- the remaining ace of the former pair of bullets -- could be traded and wouldn't necessarily block a deal. Obviously the Yankees would be in on it, but a nugget from this post is that the Yanks have "told their scouts to bear down on several teams they think could have starters available" before the trade deadline, including the Cards, Braves, A's, Angels and White Sox. (NY Post )

SETTLE DOWN, HE'S FINE: Another effect of the early preseason is the reactions to injuries. Brian Roberts has missed several workouts with neck stiffness. Since there's nothing else going on, it's big news for Orioles camp -- I mean, really, how much could you be following the Felix Pie vs. Nolan Reimold battle for a roster spot? -- but Roberts is actually OK. In fact, he said if it was the regular season he'd be playing. (MLB.com )

THE ON-BASE MACHINE: MLBTradeRumors.com reports that Nick Johnson is working out and expecting a call anyday now, because several teams are "monitoring" the oft-injured 32 year old. He has a career OBP of over .400, so he could help someone's lineup.

FEELIN' CHIPPER: Chipper Jones has been having issues with his surgically repaired knee this spring. He even needed fluid drained after inflammation as recently as Thursday, but Friday was a good day. In fact, he may play in a Grapefruit League game Sunday. (Atlanta Journal-Constitution )

TO-MORROW: Brandon Morrow is as talented as almost any pitcher in the league. We've seen evidence on the diamond, like when he shutout the Rays August 8 with 17 strikeouts and only allowed one hit. Or his 12 strikeouts in six innings against the Yankees. This season, he's looking to achieve "new heights." If he does, watch out, AL East. (Toronto Star )

NOT SATISFIED: With an OPS-plus of 130, Nick Swisher had arguably the best season of his career last season. His .288 batting average and .511 slugging percentage were both career highs for the 30-year-old veteran. Still, it wasn't enough for Swish. He wants more. (NY Daily News )

CHICKS DIG THE LONG BALL: Mike Stanton is strong. We know that. He hit 22 home runs last season in 359 at-bats. In 324 minor-league games, he hit 89 bombs. The potential is there for an elite power hitter. And Friday, he put on a "show" in batting practice. (Palm Beach Post )

CHICKS DIG DEFENSE? Designated hitter Jack Cust is most certainly not known for his fielding prowess, having played only 16 games in the field in 2010. But he flashed the leather this week in practice, to the point that teammates were impressed. (MLB.com )

DURBIN SIGNS: As expected, Chad Durbin has signed with the Indians. The Tribe's rotation is far from set, so one would figure he's going to be prominently in the mix. The righty hasn't started a game since 2007 for the Tigers. (Jerry Crasnick via Twitter )

BEATING WITH THE BRAIN: Are the Cubs smarter in 2011? They think so. (Chicago Sun Times )

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Posted on: February 25, 2011 4:45 pm
Edited on: February 25, 2011 5:07 pm
 

Imagining an MLB Combine

Michael Bourn

While our Eye on Football brethren are in Indianapolis for the NFL Combine not getting to watch guys run and jump, it got me to thinking how much fun an MLB Combine might be.

Among the drills the NFL draft hopefuls do that would be applicable to baseball are the 40-yard dash, bench press, vertical leap and the Wonderlic Test. So who would be the best baseball players to participate? That's where the fun begins.

40-yard dash: Maybe for baseball, it'd be more fun to line the guys up and have them go 90 feet.

Favorite: Michael Bourn, Astros. A Sports Illustrated poll of players during spring training had Crawford picked as the fastest player in the majors, but the less-heralded Bourn finished second. Bourn has won two straight Gold Gloves in center, and much of it is because he can seemingly cover the entire outfield. In a division blessed with fast center fielders (Pittsburgh's Andrew McCutchen and Cincinnati's Drew Stubbs), Bourn covers more ground than anyone. Oh, and he's led the National League in stolen bases each of the last two seasons.

Others: Brett Gardner, Austin Jackson, Luis Durango, Juan Pierre, Jose Reyes, Andrew McCutchen, Chone Figgins, Ichiro Suzuki, Emilio Bonifacio, Carlos Gomez, Carl Crawford

Adam DunnBench press: At the combine, players bench press 225 pounds as many times as possible, testing not only strength, but endurance. For baseball, maybe the best test would be a home-run derby-like format, but adding the distances of balls hit.

Favorite: Adam Dunn, White Sox. According to HitTrackerOnline.com, Jose Bautista had more "no-doubt" home runs than Dunn (19 to 16), but Dunn's homers averaged nearly 10 feet more, with an average "true distance" of 411.1 feet. Mark Reynolds' 32 homers averaged 415.6 feet, so he's certainly in the discussion. Dunn's been consistently hitting long home runs, so he gets the nod.

Others: Josh Hamilton, Albert Pujols, Mark Reynolds, Wily Mo Pena, Mike Stanton, Travis Hafner, Russell Branyan, Jose Bautista

Dexter FowlerVertical leap: While it's not something that you associate with baseball, it's a good test of athleticism, but is also practical at the wall as players just to rob home runs.

Favorite: Dexter Fowler, Rockies. At 6-foot-5, Fowler was recruited as a basketball player in high school, but he showed his leaping ability in an unusual place in the 2009 NLDS. In the eighth inning of Game 4, Fowler was on first when Todd Helton hit a grounder to Chase Utley. Fowler was running toward Utley and hurdled him. Utley then threw errantly to Jimmy Rollins and Fowler was safe. (You can see the play here.)

Others: Carl Crawford, Torii Hunter, Shane Victorino, Mike Cameron, Hunter Pence

Craig BreslowWonderlic test: A 12-minute, 50-question test used for testing applicants for learning and problem-solving. Harvard's Pat McInally is the only confirmed 50 score at the combine, while another Harvard alum, Ryan Fitzpatrick, scored either a 48 or 49 in nine minutes. So, it makes sense to look to the Ivy League for our baseball picks.

Favorite: Craig Breslow, Athletics. Breslow graduated from Yale with a degree in molecular biophysics and biochemistry. Seriously. The Sporting News called him the smartest player in sports, while the Wall Street Journal suggested he may be the smartest man in the world. Not only that, batters hit just .194/.272/.348 against him last season, with lefties hitting .181/.245/.340 against him.

Others: Ross Ohlendorf, Chris Young, Fernando Perez, Mark DeRosa

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed. 
Posted on: February 23, 2011 11:29 am
Edited on: April 18, 2011 11:48 am
 

Pepper: Alligator fighting, Lasorda swearing

Pujols

MONEY MAKES THE WORLD GO 'ROUND: White Sox GM Kenny Williams is defending his comments that a $30-million man would be bad for the game.

"All I'm interested in is the game," Williams told MLB.com. "We're just caretakers of this game, all of us: you guys, me, the players. We're caretakers of this game to the next generation. And then the next generation after that."

With Albert Pujols poised to enter free agency after the season, possibly commanding up to $30 million annually, Williams had ruled out the possibility of the White Sox going after the star, noting that he felt it was more appropriate to spread out dollars than to tie it up in one person. There's some sentiment for that given tying up massive dollars in one person is risky. All it takes is one injury to derail the season. Take the news that Adam Wainwright may need Tommy John surgery, for example. That's a massive blow to the Cardinals, who essentially rely on Chris Carpenter, Wainwright, Pujols and Matt Holliday to drive the team.

However, the flip side is the value Pujols gives in that one spot, freeing up chances to get league-average or better players at other spots. These type of players are far easier to get than the superstar. There's no right answer here, but it's obvious which side of the fence Williams falls on.

Williams used the opportunity to speak about parity in the game and how high-salaried superstars are essentially limited to a small pool of teams, which he is not a fan of.

"It's important that the people and the [small-market] cities ... and many more have just as much chance to hope and dream about their team winning a World Series as anybody else," Williams added. "Right now, that's not happening." (MLB.com)

I'M A CREEP, I'M A WEIRDO: Carl Crawford was "creeped out" when he found out that as part of due diligence, the Red Sox had a scout following him off the field. Obviously, it didn't stop Crawford from signing with Boston once GM Theo Epstein told him, but he admitted he was not comfortable with the idea of someone following him, although it's standard practice for Boston to monitor every major free-agent's off-the-field activities. Hey, can't blame Crawford. To learn someone's been tracking your movements over the last few months away from the ballpark is creepy. (ESPN Boston)

I'M TIRED AND I'M HUNGRY AND MY TAIL'S FROZE: Mike Stanton can sure pack away the food as roommate Gaby Sanchez says. The two, who are rooming together in spring training, recently went grocery shopping and Sanchez experienced sticker shock at the total price: over $300. "When we finished, I said, 'You got to be kidding me that we spent that much money," Sanchez said. "[The shopping cart] was completely full. We had to take three trips to get [the groceries] from the car into the house, and it was me and him carrying stuff too." Sanchez also adds he is likely to be the chef, but is willing to let Stanton take a crack at cooking. But Stanton only gets "one chance" to make good food. (Miami Herald)

THE NEXT STEVE IRWIN?: J.D. Drew isn't exactly the type of guy to make one say "That dude would totally wrestle an alligator bare-handed." Except that wouldn't be too far off the mark. Drew recounted a story Tuesday night in which he was fishing with his son and hooked a gator with a fishing lure. Drew was readying to jump on the alligator and take care of business (with a knife in tow), but the lure snapped just in the nick of time for the alligator. So next time you call J.D. Drew "Nancy Drew," you may want to rethink that. (Boston Globe)

I SPY TOMMY LASORDA SWEARING: When Google Books indexed Spy Magazine, it opened up a treasure trove of baseball facts. Such as an expletive-filled rant Tommy Lasorda had with Doug Rau, the starting pitcher in Game 4 of the 1977 World Series. You'll have to head on over to read the conversation, but it's fascinating -- but not for those who don't like strong language. Also in the article is far too much information one could ever want to know about George Brett's hemorrhoids and sex life. (Spy Magazine, Google Books)

WAINO'S NOT THE ONLY ONE: Vincente Padilla's no Adam Wainwright, but the Dodgers are hurting with the news Padilla needs surgery to release a nerve that is trapped by a muscle in his forearm. Sounds painful. There's no timetable for the No. 6 starter/reliever's return. (Los Angeles Times)

GRIFFEY, JR. ATTEMPTED SUICIDE: OK, this article is from 1992 so it's not exactly timely, but I've never heard of this before. Apparently, at age 17, Ken Griffey, Jr. attempted suicide by taking approximately 277 aspirin. "It seemed like everyone was yelling at me in baseball, then I came home and everyone was yelling at me there," Griffey said way back when. "I got depressed. I got angry. I didn't want to live." Obviously, the attempt did not work and baseball is far better off for it. (New York Times)

GUILLEN READYING FOR RETIREMENT: If Jose Guillen doesn't get a contract offer within the next week, he will retire. Hard to imagine there's much demand for a first-baseman/outfielder/DH with a bad attitude who struggled through injuries before being busted amid HGH allegations. (MLB Trade Rumors translation of ESPNDeportes)

HATERS GONNA HATE: When Astros GM Ed Wade signed reliever Brandon Lyon last season to a three-year, $15 million deal, he was exoriciated for giving so much money to a middling middle reliever. But now that the relief market has exploded, Wade's looking pretty good, as this article details. But has anyone considered that Lyon was the reason the relief market has exploded and become wildly overpaid? (Houston Chronicle)

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb  on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: February 1, 2011 4:55 pm
Edited on: February 1, 2011 5:14 pm
 

Name that Mike Stanton trivia game

C'mon, Mike, it's understandable, right?
Mike Stanton
Mike Stanton


Mike Stanton

So, let's play know your Mike Stanton, by answering the Mike Stanton on the left or the right to the following questions:

Which Mike Stanton made his big-league debut on Aug. 24, 1989?

Which Mike Stanton was born on Nov. 8, 1989?

Which Mike Stanton has played in 100 career big-league games?

Which Mike Stanton appeared in 53 postseason games during his big-league career?

Which Mike Stanton has a career .333 batting average?

Which Mike Stanton has hit 22 home runs?

Which Mike Stanton allowed 93 home runs?

Which Mike Stanton has appeared in an All-Star Game?

Which Mike Stanton received Rookie of the Year votes?

Which Mike Stanton was a first-round pick in the draft?

The key: right, left, left, right, right, left, right, right, right, trick question -- it was the right-handed pitcher Mike Stanton who played for the Astros, Indians, Mariners and White Sox from 1975-85.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

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Category: MLB
Posted on: November 29, 2010 12:50 pm
Edited on: November 29, 2010 4:09 pm
 

Rookie all-stars announced


Topps announced its annual rookie all-star team Monday, and it's a pretty nice-looking lineup. It was a good year for rookies.

1B: Gaby Sanchez, Marlins
2B: Neil Walker, Pirates
3B: Danny Valencia, Twins
SS: Starlin Castro, Cubs
OF: Austin Jackson, Tigers
OF: Michael Stanton, Marlins
OF: Jason Heyward, Braves
C: Buster Posey, Giants
RHP: Stephen Strasburg, Nationals
LHP: Jaime Garcia, Cardinals
RP: Neftali Feliz, Rangers

-- David Andriesen

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Posted on: November 22, 2010 4:26 pm
Edited on: November 22, 2010 5:28 pm
 

Ozzie talks about being trade bait

Ozzie Guillen
Ozzie Guillen is in Miami, thinking about the fact that he might have ended up a resident of South Florida a few months ago.

In October, the Chicago Sun-Times reported that White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf offered to let the manager-less Marlins hire Guillen away during the 2010 season -- in exchange for young power-hitting outfielder Mike Stanton. Reinsdorf later confirmed the story, but denied the player in question was Stanton (it might have been Logan Morrison).

Now, Guillen offers his thoughts on the situation through his blog, which is surprisingly coherent (he must have an editor). I don't know whether he was wearing this jaunty hat when he wrote it, but I prefer to think so.
"A lot of people have been asking me to talk about the trade rumors that were out there involving me, so I thought I would address it once and for all. I want to first say I don't know too much more about the rumors than anyone else. When I first heard of it, I felt very proud. It's always good to feel wanted. When you're a coach, you never think of your name being mentioned in a trade with some of the best future players in the game. At the same time, I felt very confused. Even though I've never considered myself untradeable like Michael Jordan, I never really thought the White Sox would consider trading me for anything. As far as I'm concerned, I am still proud to continue to work for the White Sox, and I will continue to do so with the same work ethic, attitude and passion I always have."

-- David Andriesen

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com