Tag:Roy Halladay
Posted on: July 30, 2011 1:53 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Renteria stings old team



By C. Trent Rosecrans

Edgar Renteria, Reds: The reigning World Series MVP stuck it to his old team with an RBI single in the 13th inning, ending Cincinnati's four-game losing skid. Renteria hasn't been very good this year -- hitting .238/.305/.298 -- but he came up big against Giants closer Brian Wilson, lining a single down the right-field line to score Jay Bruce from second for a 4-3 Reds win. It was his second walk-off RBI of the year in extras and he's now 5 for 9 in extra innings. A little extra praise here for Reds reliever Jose Arredondo, who not only picked up the victory, but also singled off Wilson in his first big-league plate appearance after the Reds had run out of position players.

Jeremy Guthrie, Orioles: With several teams scouting Baltimore's right-hander, the 32-year-old impressed, holding the Yankees to just four hits and one run in seven innings. The Cardinals, Tigers, Brewers, Rangers and Red Sox have all expressed interest in Guthrie, who lowered his ERA from 4.33 to 4.18 and improved his record to 5-14.

A.J. Pierzynski, White Sox: In a washing machine, the red socks will overpower the white ones -- but recently it's been the other way around on the baseball field. Pierzynski's two-run homer in the seventh inning led to Chicago's seventh straight victory over Boston and its 14th win in the last 16 battles of the Sox. Both teams managed just three hits, but Pierzynski made his lone hit count, homering off of Tim Wakefield to break a 1-1 tie in the seventh to deny Wakefield his 200th career victory.


Hitting streaks: Florida's Emilio Bonifacio and Boston's Dustin Pedroia both went 0 for 4 on Friday, ending a 26-game hitting streak for Bonifacio and a 25-game hitting streak for Pedroia. Both of their teams also lost while managing just three hits -- the Marlins 5-0 in Atlanta and the Red Sox 3-1 to the White Sox.

Charlie Morton, Pirates: Much has been made of the similarities between Morton and Roy Halladay -- their motions do look awfully similar. But on Friday, the results couldn't be more different. Morton allowed eight runs on nine hits in four innings, while Halladay allowed just a single hit over seven innings in Philadelphia's 10-3 victory over the Pirates.

Carlos Carrasco, Indians: After giving up his third homer of the game -- a fourth-inning grand slam by Melky Cabrera (that Cabrera admired for way too long) -- the Indians right-hander threw at the head of Royals DH Billy Butler, who had homered in the first. Carrasco was immediately ejected by home plate umpire Scott Barry. Butler was restrained by Indians catcher Lou Marson and both dugouts and benches cleared. Not to be outdone, Carrasco yelled back at Royals players as he exited the field. Carrasco took his ninth loss of the season and allowed seven runs on seven hits in 3 1/3 innings. Butler added his second homer later in the game.

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Posted on: July 27, 2011 10:30 am
Edited on: July 27, 2011 1:02 pm
 

Pepper: Is it Rasmus or La Russa in St. Louis?

Colby Rasmus

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Soap operas are being taken off network TV, but at least we still have baseball.

By the way he's portrayed, you'd expect St. Louis center fielder Colby Rasmus to be the guy with the badly dyed goatee and have ominous music every time he appears on screen. That's at least the way Cardinals manager Tony La Russa (speaking of bad dye jobs) keeps playing it.

The latest barb? Speaking to KSDK-TV in St. Louis, La Russa said Rasmus doesn't listen to the team's coaches.

"No, he doesn't listen to the Cardinal coaches much now, and that's why he gets in these funks, in my opinion," La Russa said, according to MLB.com. "If he would just stay with [basically] what they teach, he would have … but I actually feel concern for him, because he hears it from so many places, he's got to be confused."

That, of course, is a swipe at Rasmus' dad, who has been critical of La Russa publically. 

The Cardinals are actively shopping Rasmus, CBSSports.com's Danny Knobler tweeted yesterday, and if they do deal him, it's got to be a sign that the 66-year-old La Russa will stick around a couple of more years in St. Louis. Dealing Rasmus doesn't make much sense (unless there's a huge return) in a baseball-sense, but it does placate La Russa. La Russa is signed to a one-year deal with a mutual option for 2012. It may come down to a decision for general manager John Mozeliak whether he wants to tie his future to a talented 24-year-old or a manager who has managed more than 5,000 games. What happens before Sunday could tell us quite a bit about the future of the Cardinals.

No platoon: Sticking with the Cardinals and La Russa, Daniel Descalso has started at shortstop in five of the 11 games since the All-Star break, but La Russa denies there's a platoon with Descalso and Ryan Theriot. [St. Louis Post-Dispatch]

Contentious in Chicago: Cubs outfielder Marlon Byrd got into a shouting match with a fan before Tuesday's game in Milwaukee. The fan yelled "you guys suck," according to the Chicago Sun-Times. Byrd responded, "We may suck, but you're pathetic." 

Chipper out again: Braves third baseman Chipper Jones returned to the Braves' lineup from a knee injury on Monday, but then miss Tuesday's game and will miss the next few with a right quad injury. The 39-year-old has played in 78 games this season. [Atlanta Journal Constitution]

Conspiracy theory: Phillies fans got on Giants manager Bruce Bochy for how he used Cliff Lee and Roy Halladay in the All-Star Game. Several fans at the team's hotel heckled Bochy saying he tried to overuse both Philadelphia pitchers -- though Bochy notes he used both for fewer than 25 pitches. [San Jose Mercury News]

Throwing Trout back: The Angels are expected to send heralded prospect Mike Trout back to the minor leagues soon. [Orange County Register]

'Cool cat': That's how Giants reliever Sergio Romo described President Barak Obama after the Giants' visit to the White House. I'm sure plenty of people said that about Chester A. Arthur, too. [San Francisco Chronicle]

Reds return: Jonathan Mayo of MLB.com takes a closer look at the two minor league players the Reds received in return for Jonny Gomes.

Perfect in minors: Former Padre Justin Germano threw a perfect game for the Triple-A Columbus Clippers on Tuesday. It was just the fifth perfect game in the history of the International League. The Clippers are the Triple-A affiliate of the Indians. [Columbus Dispatch]

Barton hurt: There's nothing we here at Eye On Baseball like more than making fun of our fellow team member's bad calls -- like my call of Manny Ramirez as the AL Comeback Player of the Year -- so it never fails that any mention of Daric Barton gets Evan Brunell some good-nature ribbing. Brunell said he'd take Barton over Prince Fielder, Mark Teixeira or Ryan Howard -- so yeah. (Of course, I had some questionable picks, too -- Rasmus No. 1 in center?) But the point other than making fun of Evan? Well, it's that Barton, now in Triple-A, has a tear in his labrum and will see a doctor today. [San Francisco Chronicle]

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Posted on: July 24, 2011 11:32 am
Edited on: July 24, 2011 11:45 am
 

On Deck: Halladay squares off against Stauffer

On Deck

By Evan Brunell


Follow all games live with CBSSports.com's GameTracker.

StaufferHalladayBEST MATCHUP
: Tim Stauffer and Roy Halladay battle each other on the hill in Sunday's best matchup, which features the only two pitchers with sub-3.00 ERAs heading up against each other. The Phillies ace you know plenty about, with Halladay registering a 2.57 ERA. Just another day at the office. Stauffer, meanwhile, is a former first-round pick gone bust who suddenly is delivering on his promise. While his success has been aided by Petco Park somewhat, a 2.83 ERA is impressive no matter where you pitch, and his defense-independent ERA (xFIP) is a stable 3.28. Padres vs. Phillies, 1:35 p.m. ET

White SoxIndiansCENTRAL RACE: The Indians are clinging to second place in the AL Central, just one game behind the Tigers. While Indians have predictably fallen off since their hot start, at this point they should be able to stay in the race barring a monumental collapse. Calling up second baseman Jason Kipnis should help the team move past the losses of Shin-Soo Choo and Grady Sizemore on offense. Justin Masterson will take the mound with a 2.64 ERA. One interesting subplot is to watch how many fastballs Masterson tosses -- 103 of 104 pitches his last time out against the Twins were all fastballs. The ChiSox, meanwhile, are 4 1/2 out of first and have an opportunity to narrow the gap with Edwin Jackson on the hill White Sox vs. Indians, 1:05 p.m. ET

WillisSTAYING IN THE HUNT: Atlanta needs to win to stay in the division hunt, as a four-game winning streak by the Phillies has their lead up to five games. While Atlanta remains in the driver's seat for the wild card, it's too early for the Braves to pack in the division title chase, especially if they can import a bat at the trade deadline. Cincy, meanwhile, is four games out of a winnable NL Central and will send resurgent Dontrelle Willis to the mound to oppose Brandon Beachy. Willis will get to face Dan Uggla for the first time since the left-hander was traded to Detroit before the 2008 season. Braves vs. Reds 8:05 p.m. ET

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Posted on: July 19, 2011 1:13 am
Edited on: July 19, 2011 9:17 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Collmenter's gem

Josh Collmenter

By C. Trent Rosecrans


Josh Collmenter, Diamondbacks: The Arizona right-hander has one of the most unusual deliveries in the game -- a straight over-the-top motion he says comes from throwing axes growing up in Michigan. The conventional wisdom had been that once a team got a second look at his funky delivery, they'd have more success. That seemed to be the case early as Colorado and San Francisco saw him as a reliever (and had little success) and then both teams put up five runs against him in his starts. On Monday, he made his first start against a team that had already seen him start before -- and not only that, it was the last team he faced, the Brewers. On July 6 he threw six shutout innings at Miller Park. Monday he threw eight shutout innings, allowing just three runs against the Brewers, striking out seven with no walks, earning his first win in six weeks.

Clay Hensley, Marlins: Florida's right-hander came off the disabled list to make his first start since 2008 and limited the Mets to just one hit in five innings. Hensley had been on the DL since June 1 with a sprained shoulder. He had appeared in 20 games as a reliever this season before his injury. The win was Florida's ninth in its last 10 games.

Dan Wheeler, Red Sox: The right-hander not only earned the win in Monday's 15-10 victory over the Orioles, he also picked up a save of the team's bullpen. A day after (well, actually later in the same day as the end of the game) Sunday's 16-inning victory in Tampa Bay, Boston starter Tim Wakefield couldn't make it out of the fifth. Wheeler went 2 1/3 innings to help shorten the bullpen. 


Roy Halladay, Phillies: I just wanted to see if his name would actually fit below the line in this space. Halladay left in the fifth inning on Monday with a heat-related illness. In four-plus innings, he gave up seven hits and three runs in his shortest outing since June 12, 2009 when he went just three innings before going on the disabled list with a groin injury. He had a streak of 63 consecutive starts of at least six innings snapped. Halladay said he'd be fine for his next start.

Alexander Torres, Rays: Coming into a tie game against the Yankees in the ninth inning isn't exactly the easiest big league debut, but it was one to forget for the left-hander. With two outs he had three straight walks (one intentional) to force in the winning run. The Rays sent him back to Triple-A Durham after the game.

Minnesota Twins: With a chance to get right back in the thick of the American League Central race, Minnesota dropped seven games behind the division-leading Indians. The Twins couldn't even blame their two fill-in starters, Scott Diamond and Anthony Swarzak -- each went at least six innings and gave up just three earned runs (and one unearned run for both, as well). Twins hitters went 1 for 12 in the doubleheader with runners in scoring position.

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Posted on: July 12, 2011 10:03 pm
Edited on: July 12, 2011 10:43 pm
 

Halladay works two perfect innings

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Roy HalladayPHOENIX -- Even without a plan, Roy Halladay dominated.

When asked if he and catcher Brian McCann had a gameplan for Tuesday night's start for the National League in the All-Star Game, Halladay said they didn't.

"We talked a little bit about the guys. I knew some of these guys, I've faced them," Halladay said. "We didn't go over it. Coming in with the catcher, it's too overwhelming if you've got to catch 15 guys and go over everyone with all of them, so we kept it simple."

The result? Six up and six down in two innings. Halladay threw 19 pitches, 14 strikes. He struck out Carlos Beltran, got three groundouts and two fly outs. He was the first pitcher to throw two perfect innings with a strikeout since Roger Clemens in the 2001 All-Star Game in Seattle. He was the sixth starter to pitch at least two perfect innings with a strikeout, joining Clemens, Pedro Martinez (1999), Frank Viola (1988), Clemens (1986) and Steve Stone (1980).

One particular batter was of particular concern -- Blue Jays slugger Jose Bautista. But Halladay handled him easily.

"To get out there and get one pitch and get him to fly out was incredible," Halladay said.

His teammate, Cliff Lee, pitched a perfect third inning -- marking the first pair to start an All-Star Game with three perfect innings since 2001, when Clemens and Freddy Garcia achieved the feat. However, Lee gave up three hits and a run -- including a homer to Adrian Gonzalez in his second inning.

For complete All-Star Game coverage, keep up with Eye on Baseball in Phoenix

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed. For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.




Posted on: July 11, 2011 6:33 pm
Edited on: July 11, 2011 7:03 pm
 

Kershaw fine with Halladay as starter

By Matt Snyder

PHOENIX - Dodgers starter Clayton Kershaw is making his first All-Star appearance Tuesday. He's only 23, but he had a case to be the starter for the NL -- though he was likely third on the totem poll after NL starter Roy Halladay and Jair Jurrjens of the Braves. CBSSports.com had the chance to ask Kershaw if he was disappointed and if being the starter at the All-Star Game is a goal for the future.



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Posted on: July 8, 2011 5:07 pm
Edited on: July 11, 2011 1:05 pm
 

Loaded pitching highlights NL East All-Stars

By Matt Snyder

2011 All-Star Game
SEE THE OTHER DIVISION ALL-STARS: AL East | AL Central | AL West | NL Central | NL West
The strength of this divisional All-Star team is going to be mitigated by the fact that we're only picking one starting pitcher, one non-closing reliever and one closer, because this sucker is stacked with pitching. The lineup is no slouch either, in what is probably the second-best division in the majors, if not better than the vaunted AL East. I would have said the NL East was better top-to-bottom if it wasn't for that dreadful June by the Marlins. Anywho, let's get to it.

C Brian McCann, Braves: It's an easy choice, but that doesn't mean the other guys suck. Not by any stretch. Carlos Ruiz, Ronny Paulino, John Buck and Wilson Ramos are admirable backstops to varying degrees, but McCann is the best catcher in baseball this season, hands down. He's hitting .314 with 14 homers and an OPS over .900, not to mention he calls the games for one of the best pitching staffs in baseball.

1B Gaby Sanchez, Marlins: Before freaking out, Phillies fans, remember we're using DHs in this little exercise (wink, wink). We're also going to set Michael Morse aside for later and Ike Davis is injured. So it boils down to Freddie Freeman and Gaby Sanchez. Freeman's been hot of late and is hitting .279 with 13 homers, 42 RBI and a .354 OBP. Sanchez is hitting .290 with 13 homers, 48 RBI and a .370 OBP. He's also superior defensively be several metrics, so it's Sanchez in a close call.

Lineup
No. Name Team Pos
1 Jose Reyes NYM SS
2 Shane Victorino PHI CF
3 Gaby Sanchez FLA 1B
4 Ryan Howard PHI DH
5 Carlos Beltran NYM RF
6 Michael Morse WAS LF
7 Brian McCann ATL C
8 Danny Espinosa WAS 2B
9 Placido Polanco PHI 3B
2B Danny Espinosa, Nationals: Tough call over Chase Utley here, but Espinosa has played in 89 games to Utley's 38, so that makes the choice much easier. Espinosa, the NL Rookie of the Year front-runner at this point, has played a great second base for the Nats in addition to developing as a power hitter. He has 16 home runs and 52 RBI to go along with 11 stolen bases.

3B Placido Polanco, Phillies: We'd be a lot stronger here if David Wright, Ryan Zimmerman and Chipper Jones were completely healthy and hitting up to their full potential, but things haven't gone that way. Jones is in obvious age decline, Zimmerman has struggled -- until very recently -- after a lenghty stint on the DL and Wright has been on the shelf for all but 39 games. Polanco, on the other hand, has provided steady defense for the Phillies at the hot corner and is hitting .274 with a .331 OBP. 

SS Jose Reyes, Mets: Back in early April, we may have thought this would be a three-horse race between Hanley Ramirez, Jimmy Rollins and Reyes, but it's not even close. Ramirez had been awful up until the past few weeks and while Rollins is good, Reyes has been an MVP candidate -- at least until he fell injured a few days ago. Reyes leads the majors in hits, triples and batting average while also leading the NL in runs scored.

LF Michael Morse, Nationals: Hey, he's played 27 games in left, even though he's primarily a first baseman now. I'm using him here because we wanted to put together the best possible lineup and the other choices out in left in this division weren't great. Logan Morrison was the next best choice, while Raul Ibanez and Jason Bay are simply far overpaid at this point. Morse, however, has been tearing the cover off the ball since the beginning of May. He's hitting .303 with 15 homers, 48 RBI and an .887 OPS.

CF Shane Victorino, Phillies: The All-Star is really the only choice here. Angel Pagan was injured for a while Victorino has far exceeded the production of Roger Bernadina. Victorino's hitting .303 with a .376 OBP, 53 runs and 13 steals. He also plays a stellar center field behind that vaunted Phillies pitching staff.

RF Carlos Beltran, Mets: Who woulda thought this one coming into the season, huh? You've got the young studs Mike Stanton and Jason Heyward out in right in this division, meanwhile Beltran had to move to right from center to keep his knee injury from reaggravating. All he's done is go out and make his sixth All-Star team. In addition to leading the NL in doubles (26), Beltran is hitting .283 with 13 home runs, 57 RBI and a robust .372 OBP.

DH Ryan Howard, Phillies: If Chipper Jones or Ryan Zimmerman were having better seasons or David Wright and Ike Davis were healthy, this might have been a much tougher choice. Stanton could be an option, too, but I'm going Howard. He has 18 homers, an NL-best 71 RBI, an .842 OPS and just feels like a menacing DH in the batter's box.

SP Roy Halladay, Phillies: Do I seriously have to pick just one? We could put together a five-man rotation of ace-caliber pitchers -- Halladay, Jair Jurrjens, Cliff Lee, Cole Hamels and Tommy Hanson -- and still have the likes of Anibal Sanchez, Jordan Zimmermann and the injured Josh Johnson left over. What if Johan Santana and Stephen Strasburg were healthy? This is the most pitching-rich division in the majors, including the bullpen. And it's only going to get better as the young arms further develop and a dude named Stephen Strasburg gets healthy. Anyway, I have to pick one, so it's the best pitcher in baseball. Maybe Justin Verlander has a case over Halladay, but he's not in this division. Just remember, if we went out to 25-man rosters, this division would have the sickest pitching staff of all.

RP Jonny Venters, Braves: Antonio Bastardo has been excellent for the Phillies. He has a 0.87 ERA and has stranded over 99 percent of his baserunners. He's struck out more than 10 batters per nine innings and has now collected five saves. Tyler Clippard has also been outstanding. He has a 1.86 ERA and strikes out batters at an even higher pace than Bastardo. But Venters has been dominant in 53 1/3 innings (Bastardo has 31) and has thrown in more high-leverage situations than Clippard. According to FanGraph's wins above replacement player, the only relief pitcher in the NL more valuable than Venters this season has been Craig Kimbrel, who you'll see below.

CL Craig Kimbrel, Braves: Drew Storen and Francisco Rodriguez have been good, but Kimbrel leads the majors with 27 saves and has struck out 70 batters in just 45 innings. Sure, he's blown five saves, but none since June 8. Since then, he's closed all nine opportunities and hasn't even given up a run in his last 13 games. He definitely looks the part of a young Billy Wagner. Only workload is a concern for the 23-year-old at this point.

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Posted on: July 8, 2011 4:05 pm
Edited on: July 8, 2011 8:49 pm
 

On Deck: NL East showdown

OD

By Matt Snyder


It's a full slate of games Friday night as we head into the last weekend before the All-Star break. Let's start with an enticing matchup in Philly.

Beasts in the East: The Phillies have the best record in baseball, yet only a 2-1/2 game lead in the NL East, as the Braves will not go away. The Braves actually trail the Red Sox by just two percentage points for the second-best record in all of baseball. The Phillies have been pretty consistently great all season, but the Braves come to town scorching hot. They've won four in a row and 14 of their past 17. You'd have to give the advantage on the hill to the home team Friday night, though, as Roy Halladay (11-3, 2.44) takes the hill. That isn't to say Brandon Beachy (3-1, 3.23) is an unworthy adversary. Quite the contary, Beachy has 72 strikeouts in 61 1/3 innings and has shown he can dominate at times. This three-game series should not disappoint. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. ET. Watch Live on Gametracker

Off the Schneid? The Twins have beaten the White Sox eight times in a row, including all five meetings this season. They've actually won a whopping 29 of the last 36 games against Chicago's South-Siders. Talk about utter domination. It's probably gotten to the point where it's a mental mountain for the White Sox, but they still have plenty of chances this season to turn things around. Friday night, they'll have a shot. At least in theory, since the two teams play each other. Gavin Floyd (6-8, 4.17) is the starter for the Sox, but he's been awful against the Twins in his career (4-9, 5.20). Nick Blackburn is the Twins' pitcher for the night and he has completely handcuffed the White Sox this season. He's 2-0 with a 0.61 ERA in two starts against them. On paper, it looks like the streak continues, but games aren't played on paper. We'll see. Minnesota at Chicago (AL), 8:10 p.m. ET. Watch Live on Gametracker

Mediocrity Central: The Brewers and Cardinals are tied for first in the NL Central. The Pirates trail by just one game. The Reds -- who are a game under .500 -- are only three out. Hell, the Cubs are only 11 games out and they have the second-worst record in baseball. Who has the worst? The Astros. Of the NL Central. Just to give a good point of reference, the Mets would be 1-1/2 games out in this division. Instead they're 10 out in the East. We'll see how things shake out this weekend for the four teams that matter here, but they could be ordered any which way by the break. Friday, the Brewers and Reds face off in Milwaukee, with Mike Leake (8-4, 4.03) going against the thus-far disappointing Zack Greinke (7-3, 5.66). Meanwhile, the Cardinals will send Kyle Lohse (8-5, 2.97) to the hill and attempt to beat Arizona's near-All-Star Ian Kennedy (8-3, 3.38). And if the Reds and Diamondbacks win, the Pirates can slip into a three-way first place tie with a win over the Cubs. It shouldn't be difficult, as James McDonald (5-4, 4.40) gets the nod for the Bucs, and he's been hot -- 3-1 with a 2.98 ERA in his last nine starts. The Cubs send Rodrigo Lopez (1-2, 3.91) to the mound, after needing an eight-run comeback to avoid a four-game sweep in Washington. Check CBSSports.com Live Scoreboard for all game action

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com