Tag:Shin-Soo Choo
Posted on: July 5, 2010 6:22 pm

Injury creates questions for Choo's future

Shin-Soo Choo Shin-Soo Choo's injured thumb could throw another wrinkle in his military future. The Korea Times speculates the thumb injury may cost the Indians' outfielder a shot at a much-needed gold in the November Asian Games.

The Korea Baseball Organization (KBO) previously included the slugger on the preliminary 60-man roster in May. Choo is expected to recover before mid-September, when the final 22-man roster will be confirmed.

"The foremost concern is to make sure what Choo's condition is like, and then we will report to technical chief Kim In-sik and squad manager Cho Bum-hyun," a KBO official said.

For Choo, playing at the Asian Games is critically important as it is the only chance for him to get an exemption from the 2-year military service.

According to related regulations, members of a national baseball team can complete their military service with only a 4-week basic training if the team wins a gold medal at the Asian Games, or any medal at the Olympics.

Choo missed his chance previously, when the MLB refused to allow him to play at the Beijing Olympics in 2008. He was not included in the roster for the 2006 Asian Games, but South Korea ended with a bronze medal with consecutive losses to Taiwan and Japan.
-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

Category: MLB
Posted on: July 4, 2010 2:08 pm
Edited on: July 5, 2010 12:31 pm

Choo latest Indian to land on DL

Michael Brantley The hits just keep on coming for the Indians.

In what was supposed to be a rebuilding year, Cleveland has instead seen some of its youngest and brightest stars hit the disabled list i Asdrubal Cabrera and Grady Sizemore.

Now you can add Shin-Soo Choo, the team's best hitter, to the list. The Korean native sprained his right thumb and will be out six to eight weeks, reports the Cleveland Plain Dealer . He injured his thumb making a diving catch Friday night against Oakland's Jack Cust and bent glove hand back awkwardly.

Surgery hasn't been ruled out for the 27-year-old, who is hitting .286/.390/.475 and is the only Indian to have double-digit home runs with 13. He will meet with hand specialist Dr. Timothy Graham in the coming days to determine the best course of action.

"It's obviously serious," manager Manny Acta told the Plain Dealer . "More serious than we thought. He will be looked at again Tuesday and evaluated. Surgery is a possibility.''

If surgery does indeed occur, Acta doesn't believe it would be season-ending.

Choo was expected to be named to the All-Star team and may have been if not for the injury. Fausto Carmona, a starting pitcher, will be Cleveland's lone representative in Anaheim.

Michael Brantley (pictured) was recalled to ake the place of Choo. He is in the lineup batting leadoff for the Indians, playing center. Brantley was part of the CC Sabathia trade in 2008 and impressed during a 112 at-bat stint in 2009. For Triple-A Columbus, he was hitting .315/.391/.407 in 278 at-bats.

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

Posted on: July 3, 2010 9:59 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 12:16 pm

Scioscia against All-Stars for every team

Jose Rosado Because I grew up a Royals fan everywhere but Missouri, I've always been a fan of the rule requiring each team to have at least one representative for the All-Star Game.

Whether I lived in Cuba, Virginia, Texas, Japan or Georgia -- I was always guaranteed to see someone in a Royals uniform (usually George Brett) on TV every year. Not that the Royals of my youth needed the courtesy All-Star, they'd usually earned more than one berth in the game, but still, I knew there'd always be at least one. Sometimes that was the only time all year I'd be able to see a Royal on TV.

Now, though, I could -- if I wanted to punish myself -- watch just about every pitch of the Royals' awful season. With my MLB.tv subscription, my PS3, iPad and iPhone, I can watch those beautiful powder blue tops no matter where I go. That technology -- not to mention the advent of MLB Network, cable and satellite -- may have made the reason for the rule to have every team represented obsolete.

Angels manager Mike Scioscia said he thinks the rule should no longer apply.

"I'm all in favor of having guidelines where you try and represent every team," Scioscia told reporters, including the Orange County Register . "To have a hard-line rule, I think there are exceptions where a team doesn't have anyone All-Star worthy."

Scioscia was the manager of the All-Star team in 2003, when Lance Carter of the Ryas made the team with a 4.05 ERA and six blown saves.

"It's really a misnomer to say the manager picks the All-Star team. It doesn't happen," Scioscia said. "That team, with the guidelines in place, is virtually picked before it ever gets to the [manager]."

The rule helps explain why Jose Rosado's obituary will list him as a two-time All-Star and Mark Redman has an appearance on his resume.

There are currently 13 teams with losing records, some have obvious choices (like, say, the Cubs' Marlon Byrd or the Indians' Shin-Soo Choo), while it's a little tougher to choose a worthy All-Star from a team like the 24-55 Orioles (Ty Wigginton, Luke Scott?) or the 32-49 Astros (Dan Haren and his 4.56 ERA?)

Not all bad teams are created equally. The 33-46 Mariners have three worthy All-Stars in Ichiro Suzuki (who will no doubt be voted into the starting lineup by fans), Cliff Lee (if he's still a Mariner in a week) and Felix Hernandez. Even the Royals, at 35-45, wouldn't be embarrassed by David DeJesus, Joakim Soria or even Zack Greinke, who is having a down year.

If the game is truly for the fans, why not let it represent all the fans, and not just the Yankees and Red Sox? Baseball's All-Star Game is a celebration of the game with its best players and some of its nearly-best player or best players on one team. In the end, after injuries and the new rule against pitchers who pitch on Sunday throwing again in the All-Star Game on Tuesday, is it really that terrible to have the 75th best player in the game "snubbed" for the 131st?

In the end, I think of the 11-year old me waiting for Kevin Seitzer to get in the game, even if that visual is as anachronistic as my father listening to the Kansas City A's on the radio. Maybe out there somewhere, there's a kid excited about watch Andrew McCutchen get in the game, even if it's not "fair".

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

Posted on: July 3, 2010 12:23 am
Edited on: July 3, 2010 2:38 am

Andrus, Wells, Rios snubbed in All-Star voting

Elvis Andrus All-Star voting was halted Thursday night, with the most recent vote totals being released Monday and Tuesday. The final results will come out on Sunday, and some of the results will certainly be different than the most recent vote tallies.

However, the latest vote tallies are a great indicator of whom will get the All-Star nod, who will be snubbed and who doesn't belong on the list at all.

Let's take a look at the last-known vote totals for the AL and NL and see what jumps out, with the AL in this article and the NL up next...

In the AL, Mark Teixeira is somehow second in first base voting with 1.86 million votes. Justin Morneau leads with 2.1 million, so the chance is there for Tex to pull it out. However, he has gotten 2010 off to a very slow start and the two players behind Teixeira have had much, much better seasons: Miguel Cabrera and Kevin Youkilis. Simply put: Tex's .234/.345/.413 line prior to Friday play does not even sniff Morneau, Cabrera or Youkilis and he shouldn't be named to the team, let alone start.

Robinson Cano, Evan Longoria and Joe Mauer lead 3B, 2B and C candidates, respectively, by a wide margin -- no complaints there. (But what's with Adrian Beltre fourth with just over 600,000 votes?) Shortstop has Derek Jeter leading Elvis Andrus (pictured) by almost two million votes. Jeter is certainly a deserving All-Star especially with a weak shortstop crop, but Andrus should have gotten more respect.

Jeter: .283/.343/.410, 8 stolen bases, 3 caught stealing, 361 plate appearances, 51 runs, 39 RBI, -1.7 UZR/150 , 2 +/-
Andrus: .292/.374/.332, 22 SB, 9 CS, 344 PA, 55 R, 24 RBI, 5.7 UZR/150, 8 +/-

To recap: Andrus kills Jeter on defense and stolen bases. Their batting averages are similar, but Andrus gets on base a lot more. Jeter has more pop, but is that really enough to beat out Andrus?

The DH has Vladimir Guerrero over a million ahead of second-place DH Hideki Matsui. Vlad leading the DH candidates isn't a shocker, as he's been on fire all year long and deserves the nod. But Matsui over David Ortiz, who hasn't even cracked a million votes? Ortiz has been one of the better power hitters in the game since putting his terrible slump to bed. Blame the Red Sox fans for not coming out in force for this one.

In the outfield, it's tight with Ichiro Suzuki and Josh Hamilton each with 1.9 million votes, but Carl Crawford and Nelson Cruz are nipping on their heels. Nick Swisher, Curtis Granderson and Brett Gardner -- the entire Yankees outfield mind you -- follow in the 5-6-7 spots. Granderson shouldn't even be in the top 10 and Gardner is a reach, but they are there because they play for the Yankees. Torii Hunter, Magglio Ordonez and B.J. Upton round out the top 10 with Vernon Wells a curious 11. And somehow, Alex Rios isn't even in the top 15 despite being one of the best all-around outfielders in the league. The same goes for Shin Soo-Choo.

My personal ballot would mark off Choo, Wells and Suzuki as the starters with Nick Markakis representing the Orioles. I could easily be talked out of Markakis -- he's simply on my ballot as the Orioles representative. But to not have Choo, Wells and Rios at or near the top of the voting leaderboard confirms that this is all just a popularity test. But you already knew that.

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

Posted on: June 13, 2010 1:21 pm
Edited on: June 13, 2010 3:15 pm

Strasmas II: Electric Boogaloo

Stephen Strasburg started Sunday where he left off in his last start, striking out the first batter he faced in his second big-league start. Cleveland's Trevor Crowe was the eight-consecutive batter Strasburg struck out. Shin-Soo Choo followed for Strasburg's ninth strikeout in as many batters faced.

Cleveland's own rookie, Carlos Santana, at least put wood to the ball, lining out to end the first inning.

Second inning: The Russian's cut! He's human. Travis Hafner homers off Strasburg to tie the game at 1. But he has two more strikeouts, so the legend isn't quite dead. Hafner's homer is the only hit so far.

Third inning: More mortality -- no strikeouts, just three boring ground balls. Through three, Strasburg has 38 pitches, 25 strikes. His opponent, David Huff has 39 pitches, 33 strikes, for what it's worth.

Fourth inning: Apparently Adam Dunn doesn't want Stephen Strasburg to ever lose a game. Dunn homers -- like he did in Strasburg's first start -- to give the lead back to the phenom. Strasburg gets Choo again on three pitches -- the second strike was a nasty backdoor pitch and then the big curve for his fifth strikeout of the game. What's special about Strasburg so far, to me, isn't the velocity, it's those other pitches -- and I'd have a feeling Choo would agree. And for those poo-poo'd his debut against Pittsburgh, Cleveland may not have the best offense, but Choo is a professional hitter. Santana goads Strasburg into his first career walk. How about that, a guy who throws 100 who has that kind of control. And as that's written, Strasburg walks Hafner. Things then return to normal, getting Austin Kearns for K No. 6.

Fifth inning: Sir Strasburg doesn't like the mound at Progressive Field. A little delay as they repair his landing spot. So with two outs and a man on first, Trevor Crowe is left trying to bunt for a hit, because it seems like a better chance than actually swinging the bat. Ryan Zimmerman lets him know that's not a sound strategy. 

Sixth inning: Ivan Rodrguez's two-run double gives Strasburg even more of a cushion, and then Ian Desmond made it 6-1 with a two-run triple. Santana gets a bloop single for just the second hit of the day for the Indians. And then, after a couple of balls to Hafner, Strasburg's looking at his landing area again and pitching coach Dan McCatty comes to the mound. And now Jim Rigglemman is out again to talk about the mound and the field crew is out there to work on it. And now Strasburg walks Kearns and that's it for him. Strasburg went 5.1 innings, two hits, five walks, eight strikeouts and a home run. He left the bases loaded, so his line is incomplete. He threw 95 pitches, 52 strikes. He as brilliant through five, but struggled int he sixth. Drew Storen replaced him. Storen got Russell Branyan to pop up for the second out of the inning and strikes out Jhonny Peralta to close the book on Strasburg. 5.1 innings, two hits, one run, five walks, eight strikeouts.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com