Tag:Tim Lincecum
Posted on: June 23, 2011 11:02 am
 

On Deck: Twins look to bounce back



By C. Trent Rosecrans

Slow day in baseball today, with just five games on the schedule, three of those taking place during the day.

START ANOTHER STREAK: The Twins lost their first game in more than a week on Wednesday, falling to the defending World Series champs. Things don't get much easier for Minnesota, facing Tim Lincecum on Thursday. Twins starter Brian Duensing is having a June himself, going 2-1 with a 2.81 ERA this month. The lefty is 1-1 with a 3.98 ERA in 10 interleague starts of his career. The Twins have won 15 of their last 18 games and seven of their last nine on the road. Twins at Giants, 3:45 p.m. ET (Follow live)

ROAD WARRIORS: Your first-place Diamondbacks (yes, you read that right) are more than happy to be on the road and in interleague play. After starting the season 5-13 on the road, the Diamondbacks have won 14 of their last 18 in the road grays. The team is also 6-2 in interleague play so far this season and have Daniel Hudson (8-5, 3.56 ERA) on the mound against a winless Felipe Paulino (0-4, 4.10) in Kansas City as the Diamondbacks seek a sweep over the Royals. Diamondbacks at Royals, 8:10 p.m. ET (Follow live)

Roy OswaltChris CarpenterSTRUGGLING STARTERS: A Roy Oswalt-Chris Carpenter showdown should be a premier pitching matchup. Instead, the two have combined for just one win in their last 15 starts. Oswalt picked up his fourth victory of the season on June 12, snapping a seven-start winless streak, only to start another winless streak in his last outing, last Friday at Seattle. Carpenter's lone victory of the season came more than a month ago on May 10. Like Oswalt, it came against the Cubs, so maybe neither really count. Phillies at Cardinals, 8:15 p.m. ET (Follow live)

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Posted on: June 11, 2011 12:44 pm
Edited on: June 11, 2011 7:03 pm
 

On Deck: Garza/Lee showdown, Pirates see Bay

OD

By Evan Brunell


LeeGarzaPITCHING SHOWDOWN:
One of the 4 p.m. games that we'll be chatting about pits two of the better pitchers going up against each other in Matt Garza and Cliff Lee. Both pitchers are less than impressive when you look at win-loss record (and hopefully the only ones that care about that mark at this point are fantasy baseball players with wins as a category) with Garza checking in at 2-5 for the bumbling Cubs while the Phillies are trying to hang onto first with a 5-5 mark from Cliff Lee. Garza's 4.07 ERA is a major disservice, as his 2.58 xFIP and 10.71 K/9 numbers indicate. Garza is pitching better than he ever has in Tampa, but you wouldn't know it from ERA. Lee, meanwhile, has a similar disparity between ERA and xFIP with a 3.62 ERA and 2.51 xFIP. This is actually a marquee pitching matchup -- you just wouldn't know it on first blush. Cubs at Phillies, 4:10 p.m. ET (Watch live)

RedsGiantsSCUFFLING LEADERS:
The Reds are in danger of slipping to .500 if they lose on Saturday to the Giants and are already five games behind the Cardinals  and now have the Brewers making noise, too. The Reds are too good to let this recent funk last, but the Giants have their own problems. Still in first place up by two games, San Francisco has a lousy offense that has been compounded by injury troubles. The club appears to be on the verge of signing Bill Hall to step in at second base after Freddy Sanchez went down, but he probably won't be on deck for Saturday when Mike Leake, seeking his sixth victory, goes up against Tim Lincecum, also chasing his sixth victory. The similarities end there, as Lincecum is a two-time Cy Young Award winner with a 2.85 ERA while Leake has a 4.63 ERA and was demoted to the minors earlier this season. Reds at Giants, 4:10 p.m. ET (Watch live)

BayCHASE FOR .500: A team going after a .500 record isn't really of interest to the regular fan, sure, but .500 would be a moral victory for the clubs of the Pirates (who haven't reached that mark in 18 years) and Mets (what isn't wrong with the team?). Pittsburgh is just two away from the mark while New York's win will put them at .500 for the first time since May 20. R.A. Dickey, the erstwhile knuckleballer, will toe the mound for New York  while Pittsburgh counters with James McDonald. If the Pirates want to turn their fortunes around, they might want to muster more than singles, as there have been zero extra-base hits by the team in the last two games. Saturday is also a milestone in Pittsburgh of some sort, as the team will finally play against Jason Bay (pictured) at PNC Park for the first time since the slugger was traded to Boston midway through 2008. Mets at Pirates, 7:05 p.m. ET (Watch live)

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Posted on: June 4, 2011 9:52 pm
Edited on: June 5, 2011 5:29 pm
 

Best first-round picks of the last decade



By C. Trent Rosecrans

With the MLB Draft beginning Monday night at 7 p.m. ET, the Eye on Baseball crew is going to look at the best -- and worst -- first-round draft picks by each team in the last 10 years. 

With the way the baseball draft goes, there are plenty of busts in the first round every year, but there are a lot of great players in the game that were drafted in the first round and the supplemental first round. Tomorrow we'll look at the misses, but for today, here are the hits.

Arizona Diamondbacks: Most first overall picks make the majors and many (Alex Rodrgiuez, Ken Griffey, Chipper Jones) find their way to superstardom. Justin Upton may not be a superstar yet, but the first overall pick of the 2005 draft already has one All-Star appearance under his belt and will probably have more to come.

Atlanta Braves: With the 14th pick in the 2007 draft, the Braves took a local kid, outfielder Jason Heyward. Nice pick.

MLB Draft

Baltimore Orioles: Matt Wieters is close to taking this spot, but for now it's still Nick Markakis, who was taken with the seventh overall pick of the 2003 draft out of Young Harris College in Georgia.

Boston Red Sox: The Red Sox had five picks in the first round and the supplemental first round in 2005, and as good as Jacoby Ellsbury and Jed Lowrie are, the pick here is right-hander Clay Buchholz, taken 42nd overall out of Angelina College.

Chicago Cubs: While his name is now a cautionary tale, it's easy to forget just how good Mark Prior was before arm trouble. Drafted with the second pick of the 2001 draft, he won six games in 2002 and 18 in 2003, his best season. Overall, Prior was 42-29 with a 3.51 ERA.

Gordon BeckhamChicago White Sox: Even with his struggles last year and this season, Gordon Beckham has been a productive player for the White Sox after he was taken with the eighth overall pick in the 2008 draft.

Cincinnati Reds: Taken out of high school with the 12th overall pick in 2005, Jay Bruce is the reigning National League Player of the Month and only seems to be getting better at 24. He already has 85 homers in his career, including a National League-best 17 this season.

Cleveland Indians: How bad have the Indians' first-round picks been the last decade? The 18 players taken by Cleveland in the first round and the supplemental first round over the last 10 years have collected just 506 games in the majors, 334 for Cleveland. Lonnie Chisenhall (29th overall in 2008) may eventually be their best in this list, but for right now it's the Orioles' Jeremy Guthrie, who at least has 40 big-league wins.

Colorado Rockies: While the Indians' choice was tough, the Rockies' wasn't -- Troy Tulowitzki was taken with the seventh overall pick in 2005.

Detroit Tigers: With the second pick in 2004, the Tigers took Justin Verlander.

Florida Marlins: The team's best pick of the last decade came in the fourth round of the 2002 draft when it took high school pitcher Josh Johnson, but as far as first-round picks, their best is right-hander Chris Volstad, taken with the 16th pick of the 2005 draft.

Chris BurkeHouston Astros: The Astros didn't have first-round picks in 2003, 2004 and 2007 and haven't had much production from any of them. There's really just two choices, Chris Burke (10th overall, 2001) and Jason Castro (10th overall, 2008). Castro has potential, but is out this season and has played in just 67 big league games, so the pick is Burke, who played in parts of six seasons with three teams, but his 18th-inning walk-off homer (left) to clinch the 2005 NLDS against the Braves is one of the franchise's signature moments.

Kansas City Royals: This choice could be much more difficult in five years, but for now it's pretty easy -- Zack Greinke. The Royals selected him sixth overall in the 2002 draft and he won the American League Cy Young Award in 2009.

Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim: Jered Weaver was the 12th pick of the 2004 draft.

Los Angeles Dodgers: The Dodgers took lefty Clayton Kershaw with the seventh pick of the 2006 draft out of a Texas high school.

Milwaukee Brewers: This could change in a couple of years, but for now, Prince Fielder (seventh overall, 2002) leads Ryan Braun (fifth overall, 2005). Fielder is a free agent this offseason, while Braun is under contract through 2020.

Minnesota Twins: There were those who questioned the pick of hometown boy Joe Mauer with the first pick in the 2001 draft instead of Prior. Not anymore.

New York Mets: Fred Wilpon may not think he's a franchise player, but David Wright is the team's best first-round pick in the last decade, taken with the 38th overall pick in 2001.

New York Yankees: The Yankees have plenty of first-round picks on their roster, although few were their picks. Two key pitchers, starter Phil Hughes (23rd overall in 2004) and reliever Joba Chamberlain (41st overall in 2006), were Yankee picks. The pick here is Chamberlain, who has allowed fewer runs in a similar number of innings and is currently pitching.

Oakland Athletics: A chapter of the book Moneyball focuses on the 2002 MLB Draft and Billy Beane's distaste of drafting high school players. In the book, the team is excited the Brewers take a player they won't touch (Fielder), and the team also doesn't want Zack Greinke, Scott Kazmir, Cole Hamels or Matt Cain -- all high school player. But they get the man they want the most, Nick Swisher at No. 16. It's a good pick, as is Joe Blanton at 24 -- but it's hardly Greinke, Fielder, Hamels or Cain. The team also picked Jeremy Brown, a catcher out of Alabama, and Mark Teahen in the supplemental round. 

Philadelphia Phillies: Another pick from the Moneyball draft, the pick after the A's took Swisher, the Phillies snatched up Hamels, the left-hander from a California high school with the 17th pick.

Pittsburgh Pirates: The 2005 draft featured six players listed as center fielders taken in the first round -- and all six have made the big leagues. The second one taken was the Pirates' Andrew McCutchen with the 11th overall pick. The others were Cameron Maybin (10), Bruce (12), Trevor Crowe (14), Ellsbury (23) and Colby Rasmus (28).

San Diego Padres: The Padres may have had one of the biggest busts of the last decade in Matt Bush, the first overall pick in 2004 draft, but he's not been their only bad pick. The best of the lot was Khalil Greene, taken No. 13 in 2002, who had a promising start of his career, but his troubles with social anxiety disorder drove him from the game. Still, he's the Padres' career leader in homers by a shortstop with 84.

San Francisco Giants: Nine teams passed on the right-hander out of Washington, some scared off by his funky motion and small stature. Tim Lincecum proved them wrong.

Evan LongoriaSeattle Mariners: Adam Jones (37th pick in 2003) played in just 73 games for the Mariners, but was named an All-Star and won a Gold Glove with the Orioles in 2009.

St. Louis Cardinals: With a compensation pick for the Red Sox signing Edgar Renteria, the Cardinals used the 28th pick of the 2005 draft to take Rasmus out of an Alabama High School.

Tampa Bay Rays: Were Luke Hochevar and Greg Reynolds better than Evan Longoria? The Royals and Rockies took those two right-handers with the first two picks of the 2006 draft, leaving Longoria (left) for the Rays.

Texas Rangers: Funny story here -- in 2001 I was working at the Athens Banner-Herald in Georgia and was covering the NCAA Regional in Athens when a Teixeira-led Georgia Tech squad was bounced from the tournament. After his last game, a kid from the student radio station asked Teixeira if he thought his poor showing in the regional would hurt his draft status. The Georgia Tech coach, Danny Hall, took the microphone before Teixeira could answer and said, "No." So did the Rangers, who took him fifth overall.

Toronto Blue Jays: The Blue Jays took lefty Ricky Romero out of Cal State Fullerton with the sixth pick in the 2005 draft.

Washington Nationals: Another pick that could change with the emergence of Stephen Strasburg and Bryce Harper, but that's still several years away because of the fourth pick of the 2005 draft,  Ryan Zimmerman.

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Posted on: June 2, 2011 1:59 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Jimenez dazzles, Drabek falls

Drabek

By Evan Brunell


UpUbaldo Jimenez, Rockies -- In Wednesday's On Deck piece, Jimenez's struggles were documented, as his ERA ranked fourth-worst in baseball among those who were still in the majors and qualified for the ERA title. Well, that ranking just improved as Jimenez dazzled with a complete-game shutout of the Dodgers, stifling them with four hits and no walks with seven whiffs, dropping his ERA under 5.00 to 4.97. That's a major step forward for the righty who is hoping to find the magic that sparked his 2010 run of a 10-1 record.

Francisco Cordero, Reds --
Cordero reached a milestone Wednesday with his 300th overall save, pitching a clean inning with two whiffs against the Brewers. Cordero's having a sublime season so far with a 1.71 ERA and 10 saves, which is surprising coming off his up-and-down 2010, making him a prime target for those who expected Aroldis Chapman to be closing games by now. Jay Bruce and Joey Votto each slammed a two-run home run, one in the seventh and one in the eighth to make Cordero's save possible. The win pushed the Reds to their fourth win in 15 games.

Billy Butler, Royals --
The Royals/Angels game was deadlocked at zero apiece before Billy Butler stepped to the plate with one out in the ninth inning. He then sent fans home happy on a walkoff home run with a two-run job to send the Royals to victory, pushing Los Angeles to .500. But it wasn't actually a homer in the first place, as umpires originally ruled it a double. Good thing too, because Jeff Francouer stopped running on the play and wouldn't have scored had the play been upheld. "I ran out and told (umpire) Fieldin Culbreth, 'I've got no stinking idea where that ball hit,'" Royals manager Ned Yost told the Associated Press. "He said, 'Don't worry about it. We're going to do the right thing right now because I'm not really sure either. We'll go check it.' The replay showed it did make it over that fence and bounced back."

DownKyle Drabek, Blue Jays --
Drabe's fall from grace was only a matter of time, as his 1:1 K/BB ratio going into the game did not portend success. The touted right-hander can eventually emerge as the ace of the staff, but for now, it's clear the 23-year-old still has some work to do. Drabek lasted only two outs of the game, exiting after coughing up three walks and four earned runs to balloon his ERA to 4.69. And as Jeff Sullivan notes, Drabek made some unwanted history, as his strike rate of 54.8 percent would represent the worst rate over the last 12 years in baseball by a pitcher with at least 100 innings to his name. (Drabek has 63 1/3 innings on the year.) That's history you don't want.

Tim Lincecum, Giants --
The Freak was anything but Wednesday, as the Cardinals teed off for five runs in 6 1/3 innings, coughing up 10 hits although he struck out nine and walked zero, so it wasn't all bad. Still, that pushed his ERA to 2.59 after he had shaved it down with a 1.22-ERA May. It looked as if he would head to a loss before the Giants scored one in the top ninth then tacked on two in the 11th to seal the deal. The big blast came from Allan Craig, who had a pinch-hit, two-run home run in the seventh to send the Cardinals up by one.

Alcides Escobar, Royals --
Escobar's 0-for-3 night dropped his OPS to a putrid .497 on the "strength" of a .212/.249/.249 line. He has 41 hits in 193 trips to the plate and only seven extra-base hits, all doubles. Still, Escobar will get plenty of playing time as K.C. loves his defensive work. There's something to be said for shipping him to Triple-A and allowing him to gain confidence against lesser pitchers, but Escobar has plenty of time logged in the bigs and at some point, needs to start producing. To be fair to him, he made a crucial defensive play with the bases loaded in the eighth to preserve the tie.

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Posted on: May 27, 2011 5:30 pm
Edited on: May 27, 2011 5:44 pm
 

On Deck: Bruce streaking, Reds slumping



By C. Trent Rosecrans
 

Jay BruceSTREAKING AND SLUMPING: Jay Bruce may be the hottest player in the majors, but his team may be the coldest. Since Dusty Baker gave him a day off to help him get it back together on May 18, Bruce is hitting .486/.526/1.057 with six home runs and 14 RBI. His team lost the game without him and has gone 1-7 with him in eight games since. The Reds have fallen from first place in the National League Central to third, four games behind the Cardinals and a game-and-a-half behind Milwaukee. Reds at Braves, 7:35 p.m. ET (Watch live)

Tim LinecumShaun MarcumMATCHUP OF THE NIGHT: Eli Whiteside may be catching Tim Lincecum, but it shouldn't hurt Lincecum. It won't help the team's offense, though. San Francisco has an OPS of .671, better than only four teams in the National League. The good news for San Francisco -- that's still better than two other teams in the offensively challenged National League West. You know what team can hit a little bit? Milwaukee. The Brewers are kind of the opposite of the Giants -- the team OPS is .737, good for fourth in the National League as a whole, and also fourth in the National League Central. On the bump for the Brewers is their best import of the season so far, Shaun Marcum. He's 6-1 with a 2.37 ERA as a Brewer. Giants at Brewers, 8:10 p.m. ET (Watch live)

SEARCH FOR FIRST: The Diamondbacks can't take first tonight, but they do have a chance of finding themselves atop the National League West after this weekend. While the division-leading Giants are in Milwaukee, the Diamondbacks face the National League's worst team, the Astros. Arizona starter Daniel Hudson has won five of his last six starts and is 5-5 with a 3.82 ERA overall. Astros starter Brett Myers has allowed five or more runs in three of his last four starts and is 1-4 with a 5.00 ERA overall. Diamondbacks at Astros, 8:05 p.m. ET (Watch live)

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Posted on: May 22, 2011 2:31 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Lincecum, Bautista dominate

Bautista

By Evan Brunell


3 UP

Joel Hanrahan, Pirates
-- Hanrahan nailed down his 13th save by getting through some pressure. He entered the game with two runners on base and no outs in the ninth for the Tigers. Brandon Inge singled, then Hanrahan bounced back to strike out a batter and induce a double play. His ERA drops to 1.66, and it's kind of obvious at this point, especially with Evan Meek's poor season, that the Pirates made the right choice picking Hanrahan to close.

Tim Lincecum, Giants -- Lincecum is appointment viewing. He is one of the greatest pitchers we will ever see pitch in our lifetimes regardless of career timespan, and that was on display Saturday. The Freak went the distance, scattering three hits amongst six strikeouts and no walks, dropping his ERA to 2.06 and inserting himself into the NL ERA leaderboard discussion. Lincecum is able to chew up a lot of innings but is entering crazy-workhorse phase as he's pacing for 252 innings pitched. If he reaches his projections (which is a lot to ask to keep up that kind of sustained dominance), that leaves him with 270 strikeouts. That's, uh, a lot. It's doubtful Lincecum will hit these numbers, but the scary thing is... well, I'm not discounting that he'll hit those numbers.

Jose Bautista, Blue Jays -- What more can you say at this point? Even Bautista himself admits it's ridiculous. "It's always a surprise when you keep hitting home runs," Bautista told the Associated Press. "I'm not surprised about the RBIs or the fact that I'm playing well. Given what happened last year, knowing what I feel like I'm capable of doing, I expected to perform at a high level. I'm doing probably a little bit better than I expected." You think? Bautista blasted two home runs, driving in four with a 3-for-4 night to obliterate the Astros. He's swelled to a 65-homer pace through 133 games. Um, they should totally play him more. And they will, so... am I really making the leap that Bautista could potentially take down Barry Bonds? Like with Lincecum... probably not. But we've already reached ridiculous proportions with Bautista, so why not some more?

3 DOWN

Matt Albers, Red Sox  -- Albers blew it completely for the Red Sox as the seventh-inning-guy (the setup man's assistant, basically) gave up six runs, five earned with just three hits allowed in zero innings. Yep, no out recorded during this mess that also saw two walks. Albers entered the eighth inning with the Sox up 3-1. The game was in control, so manager Terry Francona decided to use the setup man's assistant in the setup role. But Daniel Bard hadn't pitched since Thursday. The Red Sox had been lucky up to that point, getting five innings from Alfredo Aceves in a spot start with one run earned. Then, Dan Wheeler went 1 1/3 strong, showing that he may be ready to contribute now that he's healed from his injury. Rich Hill, the sidearming lefty, got two strikeouts (albeit with a hit allowed) and that set up for an easy Bard-to-Papelbon finish. But instead, Albers. At least the Red Sox got to take a look at new reliever Franklin Morales, who was intriguing enough in his two innings of relief.

Jon Garland, Dodgers -- Garland didn't do well against his former team, giving up seven runs and 11 hits in 3 2/3 innings. With just one walk allowed and two whiffs, it's clear nothing was working for him. Garland was pretty decent in his previous five starts, with one other hiccup coming on April 15, when he made his first start. The kind of pitcher he is, he still has a few clunkers in store.

Adan Dunn, White Sox -- Alexi Ramirez, Paul Konerko and A.J. Pierzynski all had nice days against Garland. Adam Dunn missed on the fun with four strikeouts and a walk. He struck out swinging in the first with a man on second, to end the third with none on, walked to load the bases in the bottom fourth in a sequence that would eventually see a run scored, whiffing in the sixth with men on first and second and another in the bottom eighth with a man on second. On one hand, nice to work that walk and contribute in a way that Adam Dunn is known for. But that other stuff he's known for was quite prominent on the day.

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Posted on: May 21, 2011 11:36 am
 

On Deck: Scherzer goes for 7 wins

On Deck

By Evan Brunell


LincecumAndersonPITCHER'S DUEL: There's a nice matchup going on down the Bay as Oakland's Brett Anderson will square off against Tim Lincecum of the Giants. Anderson, considered one of the best young left-handed starters in the game, has a 3.30 ERA and will seek to right the fortunes of his team -- losers of three in a row -- and himself, with a 5.68 ERA over his last four starts after kicking the season off with a 1.56 ERA. Lincecum, meanwhile, took a 21-inning scoreless streak into Monday's game with the Rockies but walked six (a career high). He's always been a fantastic pitcher in interleague play, so this could be a good opportunity for The Freak to put that start behind him. Athletics at Giants, 7: 10 p.m. ET (Watch live)

MetsMATCHING UP: With a win Saturday, the Mets will boast a 23-22 record. The vaulting above .500 will be impressive, but it will also match the Mets with the Yankees for most wins by a New York team, as the Yanks have a 23-20 mark after losing to their neighbors Friday night. Chris Capuano will take the mound for the Mets, and it's tough to imagine the Yankees won't feast. Junkballing left-handers pitching to an AL East team? You saw what Doug Davis went through against the Red Sox Friday night. Hard to think Capuano won't be in store for the same treatment. The Yanks, meanwhile, counter with A.J. Burnett, who has an ERA under 4.00 -- just under, at 3.99. The Yankees really hope Burnett can right the sinking ship and avoid a sixth straight home loss. Mets at Yankees, 7:10 p.m. ET (Watch live)

ScherzerCHASING THE LEAD: Max Scherzer, owner of a pristine 6-0 record, will seek his league-leading seventh win Saturday against the Pirates. (In other words, it's a lock.) You won't find any of us here at Eye on Baseball putting any value into a pitcher's win-loss record, but for entertainment purposes, someone going for the league lead in wins with zero losses is pretty cool. Scherzer will take his 2.81 ERA up against a flagging Pirates offense that will likely have Pedro Alvarez to the disabled list by the time the game opens up. That will make the task that much harder for Kevin Correia, he of a 3.97 ERA which is far lower than many expected. Tigers at Pirates, 7: 05 p.m. ET (Watch live)

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Posted on: April 18, 2011 10:08 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 10:57 pm
 

Lincecum loses no-no, still ties franchise record

By Matt Snyder

Giants ace Tim Lincecum had a no-hitter through 6 1/3 innings, but Carlos Gonzalez broke up the no-hit bid with one out in the seventh. Lincecum actually kind of ran out of gas after we first posted the no-hitter watch. If there were a such thing as a jinx, maybe you could blame that on us. He ended up leaving after 7 2/3 innings, having only allowed three hits, one earned run and one walk. He struck out 10 hitters, the 29th time in his young career he's punched out at least 10 batters -- tying Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson for the Giants franchise record. Mathewson started 552 games for the Giants. Monday night was Lincecum's 126th start.

Despite losing the no-hitter and shutout, it was still obviously a very impressive outing. Lincecum did it in one of the best hitter's parks in the majors and against one of the top offenses.

Coors Field was second in home runs and first in runs scored in the majors last season.

The Rockies entered the game third in the NL in runs scored, tied for second in home runs and tied for second in on-base percentage.

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Category: MLB
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com