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Tag:Carlos Zambrano
Posted on: July 1, 2011 2:08 pm
Edited on: July 1, 2011 3:15 pm
 

Cubs place Zambrano on disabled list

ZambranoBy Evan Brunell

The Cubs placed Carlos Zambrano on the 15-day disabled list with a back injury, recalling reliever Kerry Wood.

Zambrano left Thursday's start without registering an out in the second after complaining of soreness in his lower back. He underwent an MRI, the results of which have not been released. Given Zambrano was moving around just fine in tossing out the first pitch for a softball team later that night, plus scuttling away from a foul ball (click for video).

The move is likely precautionary more than anything, as Z was due to make just two starts before the All-Star break, which adds additional days of rest for Zambrano, who previously hit the DL in 2009 with back soreness. Zambrano had righted the ship as of late, with a 4.34 ERA on the season. Over his two prior starts to Thursday, he had tossed 15 innings, giving up five earned runs which translates to a 3.00 ERA.

MLB.com reports that journeyman Ramon Ortiz will replace Big Z in the rotation. Chicago was a bit unlucky with the injury as they had just designated Doug Davis for assignment on Wednesday, and he is unable to return to fill in the breach. Ortiz will pitch for his seventh major-league club (seven in the last eight years), all the more notable given he did not pitch in the majors in 2008 and '09.

Last season, Ortiz made two starts and 14 bullpen appearances for the Dodgers, posting a 6.30 ERA. Down on the farm this year, the 38-year-old made 15 starts for the Cubs' Triple-A affiliate, posting a 4.44 ERA, hardly inspiring. His 1.9 walks per nine innings plus 7.1 K/9 rate do offer some optimism. Despite that, the Cubs will eagerly await Z's return so they can bump Ortiz.

Ortiz will make his Cubs debut on Tuesday against the Nationals.

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Posted on: June 30, 2011 3:21 pm
Edited on: June 30, 2011 8:57 pm
 

Cubs' Zambrano leaves in 2nd inning

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Carlos ZambranoCubs starter Carlos Zambrano left Thursday's game in the second inning of Thursday's game against the Giants after what the WGN-TV crew called "lower back soreness."

Zambrano was seen stretching his back in the first inning and then came out of the game after giving up a walk, a bunt single an RBI bloop single to the first three batters of the second inning.

He was replaced by Marcos Mateo who was able to get out of the inning without further damage.

Zambrano is 6-4 with a 4.34 ERA this season. He had allowed two hits and an unearned run, striking out one when he left. He did have an error that led to the one run that scored.

UPDATE: Zambrano went to the hospital to have an MRI, but the Cubs don't believe it's anything serious (MLB.com via Twitter).

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Posted on: June 30, 2011 10:16 am
Edited on: June 30, 2011 11:00 am
 

Pepper: Don't buy me peanuts or Cracker Jack

By C. Trent Rosecrans

BASEBALL TODAY: Matt Snyder joins Lauren Shehadi to talk sweeps week in Major League Baseball, as the Phillies, Yankees and Mets go for sweeps in interleague series today.

BASEBALL FOR EVERYONE: A friend of mine has spent a good 15 years of his professional career around his great love, baseball. He's hoped to share that love with his son, named for his favorite player, Nolan Ryan. The two watch games on TV, but haven't been able to experience the game live.

Nolan hasn't been able to sit in the stands and wish for a foul ball to come his way or walk out of the concourse and see the field, hear the crowd roar as Ichiro Suzuki rounds second on his way to third or hear the pop of a Felix Hernandez fastball.

You see, two years ago, like any other toddler, Nolan ate some peanut butter. Soon, he could't breathe and broke out into hives. His parents loaded him into the car and rushed to the hospital. At one point, his mother decide they couldn't wait any longer and called 911 and they pulled over to the side as an ambulance rushed to their aid, closing the I-5. The paramedics were able to get it under control and doctors told them Nolan wouldn't have lasted much longer.

Nolan was diagnosed with a severe peanut allergy. Since then, they've noticed symptoms in their son if there is even peanut dust in the air. Safeco Field or any stadium was like walking into a poison trap for Nolan. 

Well, that won't have to be the case -- as the Mariners are one of the teams hosting peanut-free games this season, an increasing trend according to this Reuters article. Peanut allergies have doubled over the last decade, and nobody is sure why.

Five times a season, the Tigers offer peanut-free suites at discount prices, the next is Sunday against the Giants and all 70 seats are sold, the Detroit News reports. That's a good sign and hopefully encourages more of this.

PHILLIES GOOD: OK, this is hardly breaking news, but the Phillies' rotation is really, really good -- and that's even without Roy Oswalt.

David Hale of the News-Journal does the math for us, the current five starters in the rotation -- Roy Halladay, Cliff Lee, Cole Hamels, Vance Worley and Kyle Kendrick -- are a combined 12-3 with a 1.33 ERA in June with hitters managing just a .194 batting average against. WIth Halladay, Lee and Worley starting this month, the Phillies have gone 13-0.

BLAME BUD: While Bud Selig is 100 percent right to want Frank McCourt out as the Dodgers' owner, Yahoo!'s Jeff Passan writes that it's Selig's fault McCourt is in this position to begin with. Instead of finding the best owner for the team in 2004, Selig went with someone who would be on his side.

EXTENSION FOR HARDY: Orioles shortstop J.J. Hardy is on several team's trade wishlist, but he may not be going anywhere. The Orioles have reached out to Hardy's agent to talk about an extension. Hardy is a free agent after the season. [Baltimore Sun]

NO FIRE SALE: After the Cubs released Doug Davis, general manager Jim Hendry met with the media and assured them there would be no "fire sale." While nobody wants the bloated contracts of Alfonso Soriano or Carlos Zambrano, Hendry insinuated he wouldn't trade the likes of Carlos Marmol or Ryan Dempster. [Daily Herald]

NO FIRE SALE… YET: The Dodgers haven't started "substantive" trade talks yet, but could begin doing so after the break, ESPN's Buster Olney tweets.

ZIMMERMAN'S CHANGES: Nationals third baseman Ryan Zimmerman has struggled after rebuilding his throwing mechanics during a season, including allowing the game-winning run with a throwing error on Wednesday. But Zimmerman is convinced he's doing the right thing and it'll pay off in the end. [Washington Post]

WOOD CLOSER: The Cubs could get reliever Kerry Wood back in time for this weekend's series with the White Sox, CSNChicago.com's Patrick Mooney tweets.

ROENICKE, GREINKE MEET: Brewers manager Ron Roenicke met with right-hander Zack Greinke to "clear the air" after Roenicke felt some of his postgame comments were misinterpreted by the media after Greinke's two-inning start against the Yankees. [Milwaukee Journal Sentinel]

BUCHHOLZ OUT PAST BREAK: After throwing a bullpen Tuesday, Boston right-hander Clay Buchholz said he won't make his next start and could be out until after the All-Star break. Buchholz is dealing with a muscle strain in his back. [Boston Herald]

STRASBURG'S MECHANICS: Stephen Strasburg is back throwing off a mound, but his mechanics look the same, some observers say. Does he need a change? Sports Illustrated's Will Carroll says he doesn't know (and if Will doesn't know, I certainly don't), but it would be wise for the Nationals to look into some biomechanics analysis to make sure his mechanics weren't the reason for his arm injury.

SWISH BEING SWISH: Nick Swisher said his recent turnaround on the field has allowed him to be himself in the clubhouse. [Wall Street Journal]

ECKSTEIN NOT RETIRED: Former Angels (among other teams) shortstop David Eckstein says he's not retired, he's just choosing not to play. There are teams that would be interested in the game's leader of grit, but isn't sure if he wants to return. He sounds like he just needs to be wined and dined in the right way and he'd return. [Los Angeles Times]

NAME GAME: Just as Hall of Famer Mickey Mantle was responsible for Pete Rose's nickname, "Charlie Hustle," another Hall of Famer hung the moniker "Donnie Baseball" on Don Mattingly. Mattingly said Kirby Puckett gets credit for the nickname. [MLB.com]

NAME CHANGE: Remember the old XFL and Rod "He Hate Me" Smart? The CPBL -- the Chinese Professional Baseball League of Taiwan -- is apparently trying some sort of similar name-changing gimmick with its foreign players. One of those is former Royal Dan Reichert who is now Robert 38. [FanGraphs.com]

DODGERS DREAM TEAM: Steve Garvey has put together what he calls a "Dream Team" to buy the Dodgers, including another former Dodger, Orel Hershiser. [SportsRadioInterviews.com]

DIFFERENT DERBY: The Midwest League featured a different type of home run derby, which featured a hitting contest with more than 50 targets and prizes, including a dunk tank. Really, though, the biggest improvement over the big-league version is the absence of Chris Berman. [Benjamin Hill]

BUTCH'S TIRADE: Former big-leaguer Butch Hobson is now a manager in an Independent League, but his tirade from the other night is certainly worthy of the majors. Check him out has he does a combination of Lloyd McClendon and Terrell Owens. [h/t ItsAlwaysSunnyInDetroit.com]

MASCOT FAIL: Is that a sock or are you just happy to see me? Check out this independent league mascot in Amarillo, Texas. Yep. That's not good. [h/t Big League Stew]

BRING A PACKED LUNCH: I've always wanted to go see a game on one of the Wrigley Field rooftops, and I'd still like to -- I'm just not sure I would eat anything they have. Several rooftop businesses failed their health inspections recently. [Chicago Tribune]

CONGRATS CHONE: FanGraphs.com looks at the worst players in baseball based on 2010 and 2011 -- with Mariners infielder Chone Figgins edging Brewers shortstop Yuniesky Betancourt for the title.

CIVIL WAR-STYLE GAME: If you're in Savannah, Ga., this weekend, you have plenty of entertainment and dining options, but how about checking out some baseball at a Civil War fort? Fort Pulaski will host a game Sunday featuring rules from 1860. [Connect Savannah]

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: June 27, 2011 7:09 pm
Edited on: June 27, 2011 7:22 pm
 

Rockies looking at starting pitching market

Sanchez

By Evan Brunell

The Rockies were supposed to have a deep rotation with Ubaldo Jimenez, Jorge De La Rosa and Jhoulys Chacin all playing integral roles with Jason Hammel and Aaron Cook serving as capable back-of-the-rotation starters.

Except Jimenez has been touch-and-go, De La Rosa was lost to Tommy John surgery earlier in the season and despite Hammel's strong 4.13 ERA, his peripherals have taken a step back. That's required Cook and Juan Nicasio to play more prominent roles and to no one's surprise, they aren't quite delivering. That's led Colorado to start poking around the starting pitching market, the Denver Post reports.

If Cook and Nicasio can turn their seasons around, Rockies GM Dan O'Dowd could dial back his pursuit of a starter, but that's unlikely. The problem facing Colorado is that the market is thin. There are many teams still in the hunt for a postseason spot which narrows the pool of candidates. That jacks up the prices of pitchers who could be traded.

The Post names Wandy Rodriguez and Brett Myers as two pitchers the Astros will discuss. Affecting Houston's flexibility is the fact that new owner Jim Crane is not expected to take over the team by the trade deadline. That's a tough job for GM Ed Wade. The Astros need to rebuild, but can the club really engineer a rebuilding effort before Crane officially takes over?

Carlos Zambrano remains perpetually available, but the most attractive pitcher on the market has to be Anibal Sanchez. While the 27-year-old isn't available just yet, the thinking is that he could be traded if the Marlins continue sinking into the abyss. The right-hander makes $3.7 million and will enter his final year of arbitration after the season. No wonder he's available from the tightfisted Marlins club.

If Sanchez does indeed become available, he'll likely be the best pitcher available, more so than Rodriguez. While shoulder issues have plagued Sanchez over his career, he's also posted a 2.62 ERA over 16 starts and made a full 32 starts last season with a 3.55 ERA. His health may be a risk, but he's got 300 1/3 innings over the last year and a half that speaks to his recent durability. The chance to acquire a frontline ace is rare, and Sanchez is pitching like one this season. There won't be any shortage of contenders, and the Yankees especially would likely love to get their hands on the ex-Red Sox prospect.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: June 24, 2011 8:02 pm
Edited on: June 25, 2011 5:25 pm
 

With rebuild on way, who could Cubs trade?

Soriano

By Evan Brunell


The Cubs are gearing up for trade season, as GM Jim Hendry and his staff plan to determine the team's future leading up to the trade deadline. The Chicago Tribune says that Chicago will start taking bids on overpriced or underachieving players, as Hendry continues his third rebuild, although he could be out of a job once the season ends.

With those parameters in mind, who could the Cubs deal?

Kosuke Fukudome, right fielder
Original contract:
4 years, $48 million
Contract remaining (includes 2011):
1 year, $13.5 million

Fukudome is enjoying his most productive season and has gotten better with each of his four years in the majors. He's playing center field on Friday for the first time since 2009, which tells you the Cubs are trying to keep his bat in the lineup. He still doesn't hit for much power, but that doesn't matter when you have a .400 OBP. Even better is the fact he is no longer a platoon player against left-handed pitching.

Chance of being traded: Fukudome has never really seemed to fit in Chicago, although his disappointing production to start is partly to blame. The Cubs project to have an Alfonso Soriano - Brett Jackson - Marlon Byrd outfield next season, so Fukudome would appear to be the odd man out. There are several teams in demand of an outfielder and it will be hard to do much worse than Fukudome in production, salary and cost to acquire.

John Grabow, reliever
Original contract:
2 years, $7.5 million
Contract remaining: 1 year, $4.8 million

For a team rebuilding, do they really need a reliever tasked with getting left-handers out -- but isn't? Grabow's contract is obviously not a hindrance, but his performance this season isn't up to par. While he's still getting lefties out at a better clip than righties, he hasn't exactly been a lockdown reliever. In 31 innings, Grabow has walked 11 and whiffing 16, posting up a 4.94 ERA and 4.79 xFIP.

Chance of being traded: Grabow isn't getting the job done overall or against left-handers, and the contract is hefty for his (lack of) production.

Carlos Pena, first baseman
Original contract:
1 year, $10 million

Pena isn't really underachieving thanks to his power production, nor is his contract prohibitive, but a .220 batting average is disappointing even if it represents a 24-point increase over 2010. By trading Pena, the Cubs could give Tyler Colvin an extended shot at playing time in the second half, plus gear up for possible runs at Albert Pujols and Prince Fielder. There are teams out there that would welcome Pena's 14 bombs and .350 OBP.

Chance of being traded: Pena will probably stay, as none of the clear contenders other than the Angels appear to have any interest or need of a first baseman. If Washington somehow stays hot and inserts itself in the postseason race, they could use Pena as Adam LaRoche is now lost for the season due to injury. Washington actually coveted Pena over LaRoche, but the former Ray opted for Chicago.

Aramis Ramirez, third baseman
Original contract:
5 years, $75 million
Contract remaining: 1 year, $14.6 million, plus $16 million club option ($2 million buyout)

Ramirez has a no-trade clause and has already said he won't allow a trade out of Chicago, but he could always change his tune based on where he would be traded or just by flat-out changing his mind. After all, as Alfonso Soriano said recently, why would you block a trade if the team wants you out? Ramirez had a brutal first half last season before recovering in the second half. He hasn't been much better this season.

Chance of being traded: Unless a team is really desperate and the Cubs agree to cover the buyout plus some of his current deal (fat chance), Ramirez is staying.

Alfonso Soriano, left field
Original contract:
8 years, $136 million
Contract remaining: 4 years, $72 million

Soriano's 2009 is looking more and more like an aberration -- at least for now. That's good, but he still hasn't reached the level of play he flashed in his first two years with the Cubs. The 35-year-old is a liability on defense, is showing regression in plate discipline without much difference in contact levels and is just overall a massive risk for a team to take on.

Chance of being traded: Unless Soriano is part of another bad contract trade (for Barry Zito?), he's going to be finishing out his deal. How this contract is going to look in two years is a scary thought.

Carlos Zambrano, starting pitcher
Original contract:
5 years, $91.5 million
Contract remaining: 2 years, $38.875 million, plus $19.25 million vesting player option

Out of all the players on the list, Zambrano looks the most appetizing. Unfortunately, it's almost by default. Big Z has just one year after this remaining on his deal and it's a long shot he will get that player option to vest as he has to finish in the top four of Cy Young Award voting next season to trigger it. But as everyone knows, he's quite a hothead and is too erratic and inconsistent in his pitching. His 4.50 ERA won't draw any fans, although he's always capable of ripping off a dominating stretch as everyone witnessed in his final 11 starts of 2010.

Chance of being traded: Teams are always in need of pitching, so Zambrano might be able to find a new home by July 31. The odds are that he stays and is part of the rumor mill during the offseason.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.


Posted on: June 21, 2011 9:54 am
Edited on: June 21, 2011 6:53 pm
 

Pepper: Pujols' injury keeping him in St. Louis?

By C. Trent Rosecrans

BASEBALL TODAY: Well, just who is that handsome man joining Lauren Shehadi today? Why, it's me. Hear me ramble about Josh Outman, Dillon Gee and the Marlins in today's Baseball Today.

Cubs TO PASS ON PUJOLS: There are questions about whether the Cubs can even afford to go after Albert Pujols, but the Chicago Sun-Times' Gordon Wittenmyer speculates that Pujols' wrist injury could keep the Cubs from even entering the sweepstakes for the three-time MVP.

Although Pujols has been incredibly durable throughout his career, the injury he suffered Sunday could send red flags to teams considering the long-term investment that Pujols will require. Pujols will likely be looking for the security of a long deal, one that could be the final contract of his career. With concerns about his health, the Ricketts family may just have the excuse they were looking for as to why the Cubs can't lure Pujols from St. Louis.
It could also be nothing; it could be a blip on Pujols' career -- but at this age, you have to consider how long you can be saddled with a declining player. The Cubs have been hamstrung by contracts in the past (see Alfonso Soriano, Carlos Zambrano, Milton Bradley) and a decline triggered by injuries and aided by age can even happen to the game's best players (Ken Griffey Jr.).

There'll still be a market for Pujols after the season, that's for sure. But it'll be interesting to see what kind of markdown there will be following Sunday's injury.

Or, perhaps, this spurs the Cardinals and Pujols to reconsider signing an extension during the season, as Jeff Passan of Yahoo! urges both sides to consider.

Either way, the injury may hurt the Cardinals in the short term but help keep Pujols in St. Louis for the rest of his career.

M'S LEADER: In St. Louis, Brendan Ryan's energy and personality was seen as an annoyance to Tony La Russa. In Seattle, it's a positive, as the shortstop has emerged as a team leader for the surprising Mariners. [Seattle Times]

HOLD FOR FULD: And yet another chapter in the legend of Sam Fuld. While Fuld's numbers have dropped from his hot start, he helped out the Rays in another way Monday -- on the mound. Really, Fuld warming up for the eighth inning isn't as much a testament to Fuld as it is manager Joe Maddon. The Rays needed more time to warm up lefty Cesar Ramos and since Fuld had already entered the game in the pitcher's spot, he didn't have to throw a pitch in the eighth but did take up enough time to allow Ramos to get ready to pitch. [St. Petersburg Times]

NEXT PROSPECT UP: 'Tis the season for prospect call-ups, and the next one may be the Pirates' Alex Presley, the team's 2010 Minor Leaguer Player of the Year who's hitting .332/.382/.506 with eight home runs in Triple-A. Pirates GM Neal Huntington said if the Pirates weren't in the stretch of games in American League parks, Presley would already be with the big club. [Pittsburgh Post-Gazette]

PASSING OVERBAY: Pirates manager Clint Hurdle said first baseman Lyle Overbay won't start during the team's series with the Orioles to work on his hitting. Garrett Jones started at first in Overbay's place Monday. Overbay is 4-for-30 in his last 11 games, dropping his season line to .228/.307/.353. Hurdle said Overbay may still be used to pinch-hit or as part of a double switch, but Jones will start the next two games. [MLB.com]


NL CATCHES A BREAK: While the National League gets pounded by the American League in interleague play, the senior circuit may catch a break in the All-Star Game. The way the Tigers' rotation shakes out, Justin Verlander would pitch on the Sunday before the July 12 game in Phoenix, making him ineligible to pitch in the All-Star Game two days later. [MLB.com]

INSIDE THE BASEBALL STUDIO: In one of the great, "I wish I would have thought of that" features of recent years, Patrick Cain of FanGraphs.com asks baseball players actual questions from James Lipton on Inside the Actor's Studio. His first one is with Reds starter Bronson Arroyo -- I will say, it'll be interesting to see how many guys go along with this. Bronson's one of those who will answer any question -- and give you great answers. Anyway, bravo Patrick, bravo. 

JOEY BALLGAME?: Had the Reds not taken Joey Votto in the second round of the 2002 draft, the Yankees were ready to snap up the reigning National League MVP. Former Yankee scout Dick Groch was in Votto's living room on draft day waiting for the Yankees to take him. It wasn't quite that close, though (not like, say, the Reds skipping Derek Jeter to take Chad Mottola in 1992), as the Reds selected Votto with the 44th overall pick. The Yankees didn't have a pick until 71 after losing their first-round pick by signing Jason Giambi as a free agent in 2001. So, even if the Reds had passed on Votto, we might be saying the same thing about whatever team picked him up between picks 45 and 70. [ESPNNewYork]

RAYS WOES: There was some positive baseball attendance news from this past weekend, but it wasn't coming from Tampa Bay. The Rays are second-to-last in attendance, yet have the most affordable tickets in professional sports, according to an ESPN the Magazine. [Tampa Tribune]

COFFEY RUN: Nationals reliever Todd Coffey has sprinted in from the bullpen his entire career. At the Nationals' annual Dream Foundation gala on Saturday night, Coffey made his entrance at a full-on sprint -- in a tuxedo. [Washington Post]

RICKEY A LINK TO THE A'S PAST: Rickey Henderson is working as a roving instructor in the Oakland minor league system. San Francisco manager Bruce Bochy remembers how beloved an older Rickey was in San Diego, while the San Francisco Chronicle's Gwynn Knapp says Rickey is a link to the team's successful past. Rickey being Rickey can't but help Rickie's brother, Jemile Weeks, and the rest of the A's. 

HUGHES' ROAD BACK: Coming off an impressive start for short-season Staten Island on Sunday, Yankees right-hander Phil Hughes will make another start Friday for Double-A Trenton. [Trentonian]

Mets MESS: The Mets owners fired back at Irving Picard, the trustee overseeing the Bernie Madoff bankruptcy case, in their motion to dismiss the $1 billion lawsuit filed against them. [New York Daily News]

CANADIAN HALL: One of my all-time favorite baseball cards was the Topps Tom Henke All-Star card from 1988. I'm not sure why it always amused me so much, but I'm sure it had to do with the glasses. Still, the glasses often overshadowed one of the best pitchers of the 80s. Henke was inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame this past weekend. [National Post]

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: June 17, 2011 1:28 pm
Edited on: June 17, 2011 4:51 pm
 

Yankees scout Zambrano; could deal for righty

By Evan Brunell

With trade season kicking into gear and the Chicago Cubs inching closer and closer to irrelevancy, teams still in the postseason hunt are starting to scout Cubs players. The Yankees are no exception and are thought to be taking a serious look Carlos Zambrano, ESPN Chicago reports.

The Yankees had several scouts watch Zambrano pitch on the most recent 10-game road trip. These scouts weren't doing due diligence for the upcoming Yankees-Cubs series as New York uses video for advance scouting. No, these were top advisers to GM Brian Cashman, so the interest is real. Also helping matters in greasing a Zambrano-to-New-York trade is the fact that Big Z's pitching coach for his first nine years in the majors, Larry Rothschild, is now the Yankees' pitching coach. Rothschild jumped to the Big Apple before the 2011 season.

Zambrano has a 4.59 ERA on the season in 96 innings, punching out 67 and walking 35. That's improved command that Zambrano hasn't displayed since 2008, but his strikeout rate is just 6.4 K/9, also 2008-type numbers; he punched out just over eight per nine innings in the last two seasons. His ERA is a bit misleading, as it was at 3.98 just two starts ago; in addition, his FIP (similar to ERA, except it strips out all effect defense and other factors have on a pitcher's numbers) for the season is at 3.83.

There's $27 million left on Zambrano's contract, which the Yankees would have no problem absorbing if it meant giving up less in a trade. The righty does have a no-trade clause, but back on June 6, ESPN Chicago quoted a friend of Zambrano's saying, "At this point Carlos would probably let the Cubs trade him to Siberia."

Some Yankees evaluators prefer Ryan Dempster to Zambrano -- who wouldn't? -- but the Cubs are not believed to be interested in dealing Dempster. All told, a trade for Zambrano by the Yankees remains, at the very least, an intriguing option.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.



Posted on: June 15, 2011 4:22 pm
Edited on: June 15, 2011 4:32 pm
 

On Deck: AL Central Showdown, Round 2



By C. Trent Rosecrans

Central showdown: Detroit took round one of the three-game series between the Tigers and Indians, giving the home team a one-game lead in the division. Tonight, the Indians have their top starter on the mound, but he's been anything but an ace of late, going 0-5 with an 8.49 ERA in his last six starts. Meanwhile, Detroit's Brad Penny is 3-0 in four starts against the AL Central this season, but he hasn't faced Cleveland. Penny has just one win in his last four starts. Indians at Tigers, 7:05 p.m. ET (Follow live here)

Roy HalladayAnibal SanchezMatchup of the night: The first game of today's day-night doubleheader in Philly was a bit of a laugher following the Phillies' six-run third en route to an 8-1 victory, but the nightcap shouldn't be a repeat with the pitching matchup of Roy Halladay vs. Anibal Sanchez. Halladay, well, is one of the game's premier pitchers, coming into the game 9-3 with a 2.39 ERA. Sanchez is having a good season so far, going 6-1 with a 3.06 ERA and for all of Florida's struggles, the Marlins have won eight of his 13 starts. Marlins at Phillies, 7:05 p.m. ET (Follow live here)

Streaking the other way: The Brewers' losses to the Cubs in the first two games of the teams' four-game series marked Milwaukee's first losses in consecutive games since it's seven-game losing streak from April 30-May 6, a streak of 35 games without back-to-back losses. They'll have to beat Carlos Zambrano, who beat the Brewers on April 8 and is 13-8 with a 3.73 ERA in 32 games against Milwaukee. Chris Narveson (3-4, 4.32 ERA) is on the mound for the Brewers. Brewers at Cubs, 8:05 p.m. ET (Follow live here)

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com