Tag:Shaun Marcum
Posted on: June 17, 2011 10:21 pm
Edited on: June 17, 2011 11:03 pm
 

Marcum leaves early with strained hip flexor

By Matt Snyder

Brewers starting pitcher Shaun Marcum left after only one inning of work Friday night in Boston. He did throw 44 pitches and labored just to get through the frame, but that's still an early exit. Several hours later, we now know why. Marcum left with a left hip flexor strain (Tom Haudricourt via Twitter). Marcum will be evaluated Saturday, so until then we don't really know much about the injury.

If Marcum's forced to miss any amount of time for the Brewers, it's a huge loss. The 29-year-old right-hander entered Friday 7-2 with a 2.68 ERA, 1.02 WHIP and 83 strikeouts in 90 2/3 innings. Assuming he is healthy, he's probably on his way to a first All-Star Game appearance and has been the Brewers' top pitcher so far this season -- though Yovani Gallardo and Zack Greinke would be the two in the mix for the "ace" title.

The Brewers lost 10-4 to the Red Sox, but still hold a one-game lead in the NL Central, as the Cardinals lost their seventh consecutive game Friday night.

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Category: MLB
Posted on: June 12, 2011 10:13 am
Edited on: June 13, 2011 4:04 pm
 

On Deck: Changes atop Central leaderboards?



By C. Trent Rosecrans

CENTRAL SHOWDOWN: After taking the first two games of their series, the Brewers could take first place in the National League Central with a victory over the Cardinals at Miller Park. Milwaukee's Shaun Marcum takes on St. Louis' Jake Westbrook as the Brewers trail the Cardinals by just a half-game in the standings. Westbrook has won his last four decisions, while Marcum hasn't won in his last four, even though he allowed just two hits in six innings his last time out, Tuesday against the Mets. Cardinals at Brewers, 2:10 p.m. ET (Follow live scoring)

FINAL DAY IN FIRST? Having dropped their last three and eight of their last nine, the Indians have fallen into a virtual tie for first place in the American League Central with the Tigers, leading Detroit by just percentage points. Cleveland starter Josh Tomlin has seen his ERA rise nearly a run from 2.74 to 3.71 with his last two starts, allowing six earned runs in six innings in a victory over the Blue Jays and doing the same in a loss to the Twins. He faces the Yankees' Freddy Garcia, who was knocked around in his last start. However, the Tigers need to solve Felix Hernandez to either take first or keep pace with the Indians. Indians at Yankees, 1:05 p.m. ET (Follow live scoring) and Mariners at Tigers, 1:05 p.m. ET (Follow live scoring)

ENCORE: In his big-league debut, Florida's Brad Hand allowed just one hit in six innings against the Braves, striking out six. However, the one hit Hand allowed was a solo home run by Atlanta's Alex Gonzalez in a tough-luck 1-0 loss to the Braves. Hand gets another chance at a victory, facing Daniel Hudson (6-5, 3.98 ERA) and the Diamondbacks. Diamondbacks at Marlins, 1:10 p.m. ET (Follow live scoring)


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Posted on: May 27, 2011 5:30 pm
Edited on: May 27, 2011 5:44 pm
 

On Deck: Bruce streaking, Reds slumping



By C. Trent Rosecrans
 

Jay BruceSTREAKING AND SLUMPING: Jay Bruce may be the hottest player in the majors, but his team may be the coldest. Since Dusty Baker gave him a day off to help him get it back together on May 18, Bruce is hitting .486/.526/1.057 with six home runs and 14 RBI. His team lost the game without him and has gone 1-7 with him in eight games since. The Reds have fallen from first place in the National League Central to third, four games behind the Cardinals and a game-and-a-half behind Milwaukee. Reds at Braves, 7:35 p.m. ET (Watch live)

Tim LinecumShaun MarcumMATCHUP OF THE NIGHT: Eli Whiteside may be catching Tim Lincecum, but it shouldn't hurt Lincecum. It won't help the team's offense, though. San Francisco has an OPS of .671, better than only four teams in the National League. The good news for San Francisco -- that's still better than two other teams in the offensively challenged National League West. You know what team can hit a little bit? Milwaukee. The Brewers are kind of the opposite of the Giants -- the team OPS is .737, good for fourth in the National League as a whole, and also fourth in the National League Central. On the bump for the Brewers is their best import of the season so far, Shaun Marcum. He's 6-1 with a 2.37 ERA as a Brewer. Giants at Brewers, 8:10 p.m. ET (Watch live)

SEARCH FOR FIRST: The Diamondbacks can't take first tonight, but they do have a chance of finding themselves atop the National League West after this weekend. While the division-leading Giants are in Milwaukee, the Diamondbacks face the National League's worst team, the Astros. Arizona starter Daniel Hudson has won five of his last six starts and is 5-5 with a 3.82 ERA overall. Astros starter Brett Myers has allowed five or more runs in three of his last four starts and is 1-4 with a 5.00 ERA overall. Diamondbacks at Astros, 8:05 p.m. ET (Watch live)

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Posted on: May 5, 2011 5:48 pm
 

On Deck: 4 games, 3 good matchups

Shaun Marcum


By C. Trent Rosecrans


With eight of the day's 12 games starting before a regular 7 p.m. start time, there's not the full compliment of on-deck choices, but luckily the night games feature three pretty good pitching matchups… and the Rangers and Mariners.

Stopper needed -- The Brewers have lost five in a row, including two yesterday in Atlanta, and are now four games under .500 at 13-17. Luckily for them, Shaun Marcum is on the mound. Marcum was the last Brewers pitcher to earn a victory, last Friday at Houston. Marcum is 3-1 with a 2.21 ERA and faced Brandon Beachy (1-1, 3.47 ERA). Brewers at Braves, 7:10 p.m. ET

If it weren't for bad luck… -- Nationals starter John Lannan has a 3.93 ERA in his three losses, and actually has a better WHIP in his losses (1.364) than in his two wins (1.600). In his last game, he allowed just six hits and two runs in 6 2/3 innings, but walked in a run in the seventh, losing the game 2-1 to the Giants. And tonight he faces Roy Halladay. Nationals at Phillies, 7:05 p.m. ET

Daddy done good -- Since his wife gave birth, the Diamondbacks' Ian Kennedy has allowed just three runs and nine hits in 16 2/3 innings, limiting batters to a .148 batting average and striking out 16. He's facing Colorado's Jason Hammel, who is 3-1 with a 3.23 ERA. Rockies at Diamondbacks, 9:40 p.m. ET

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Posted on: April 19, 2011 12:52 pm
Edited on: April 19, 2011 12:53 pm
 

Brewers place Marcum on bereavement list

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Shaun MarcumThe Brewers have placed right-hander Shaun Marcum on the bereavement list.

Marcum, 29, is leaving the club to be with his father, who is having heart surgery.

The team has called up right-handed reliever Mike McClendon from Triple-A Nashville to take his place on the roster. McClendon has appeared in three games for the Sounds, allowing four hits and no runs in 6 1/3 innings. He's struck out four and walked one.

Marcum started on Monday, so he could easily return by Sunday, which would be his next turn in the rotation with Thursday's off day for the Brewers. Marcum allowed five hits and an unearned run in a no-decision in Milwaukee's 12-inning victory over the Phillies.

Players on the bereavement list must miss a minimum of three games and a maximum of seven.

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Posted on: April 19, 2011 1:24 am
Edited on: April 20, 2011 1:13 am
 

3 up, 3 down for 4/18: That's gold, Jerry

By Matt Snyder

3UP

Jerry Sands, Dodgers. Going 1-3 isn't exactly setting the world on fire, but Sands made an impact in his first major-league game. He doubled in his first at-bat and then hit a sacrifice fly next time up. The significance there is that the Dodgers had gotten just two RBI from left field all season, and Sands had needed two plate appearances to get halfway home. He made enough of an impact that Tim Hudson threw a pitch behind him next at-bat -- Ted Lilly retaliated next inning by doing the same to Nate McLouth and both benches were warned.

Felipe Lopez, Rays. Greeted with mass mockey in the Twitter world for being a cleanup hitter, Lopez quieted the critics for one night by going 3-4 with a double, home run, two runs and three RBI. He's raised his triple slash (batting average, on-base percentage, slugging percentage) lines to .316/.350/.553. And the Rays won, giving them a 6-1 record since that dreadful 1-8 start.

Kevin Correia, Pirates. Picked up off the scrap heap by the Pirates after a disastrous 2010 season, Correia hurled a complete game Monday against the division-leading Reds. He now has a 2.48 ERA through 29 innings. And don't look now, but the Pirates -- after having taken two of three from the Reds -- are only a game out. Of course, it's a four-way tie at 8-8, but still a game out and tied for second place. I'm sure Pirates fans will take it.

3DOWN

Esmil Rogers, Rockies. The 25 year old had gotten off to a nice start to 2011, sporting a 2.77 ERA through two starts. So much for that. He was absolutely torched by the Giants Monday night. In only three innings, Rogers allowed six hits, two walks and eight earned runs. In the first inning, he gave up back-to-back home runs to Pat Burrell and Nate Schierholtz -- the latter of which was a 450-plus foot moonshot to the upper tank. Needless to say, Rogers wasn't fooling anyone Monday.

Ricky Romero, Blue Jays. The pitching matchup seemed to favor the Jays, as Romero was the opening day starter and the Red Sox were running Dice-K out there. Instead, they seemed to reverse roles. Romero couldn't make it through five, giving up eight hits and five earned runs. The worst part, though, was Romero's lack of command. He walked five guys and it took 109 pitches just to complete 4 1/3 innings.

Win as a short-term stat. Carlos Zambrano, Tim Stauffer and Shaun Marcum combined to throw 21 scoreless innings, yet none of them came away with a win. Zambrano was especially impressive, working eight shutout innings and striking out 10 batters for the first time since his no-hitter in September of 2008. But, wait, he didn't get the win! Gimme a break.

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Posted on: April 9, 2011 12:50 pm
 

Pepper: Appreciating Manny's talent

Ramirez

By Evan Brunell

MORE MANNY: Stop me if you've heard this before, but Joe Posnanski has written a great story. And as you may have gathered by now, it's about Manny Ramirez. Here's Poz:

In my own romantic view of baseball and the world, I tended to see Manny as baseball’s Mozart — an often vile personality who did one thing so beautifully that you could not turn away. ... [I]t was clear that these tough old baseball men who had no respect at all for the way Ramirez treated the game were almost absurdly awed by his talent. They talked of games he would play with pitchers during spring training to set them up later in the year. They talked of adjustments he would make pitch-to-pitch that were so remarkable they could only compare it to chess grandmasters. Bill James ... insisted that Manny Ramirez would purposely get into 3-2 counts with a runner on first so that the runner would be on the move with the pitch and could then score on the double MannyBManny planned to hit.

There's no question that Manny's legacy is stained beyond repair. He's effectively failed three drug tests now, and we're all left to wonder just how long this has been going on. But despite steroids, Manny was a revelation. After all, how many people took steroids to get ahead and how many turned out like Manny? While there's no excuse for Ramirez's actions, it's always been clear that he had an incredible, uncanny ability to hit, both mentally and physically. Those talents come along once in a generation and while Ramirez deserves every ounce of blame for sullying his magical talent, you can't help but marvel at what he's done in the game. (Sports Illustrated)

OWNERS NARROWED: The Mets have narrowed their search for a new minority owner to eight candidates. "They are very happy with the numbers they're seeing. There's a range - the low end is marginally acceptable and the high end is very acceptable," a source said of the Wilpons, who are expected to bring in the new owner by July. (New York Daily News)

ROTATION QUESTIONS: Shaun Marcum seems as if he will be able to make his next start on Tuesday, so Marco Estrada appears ticketed for the bullpen. (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel)

LOVING BASEBALL: The president of Harvard University takes to the newspaper pages to write about why she loves baseball. (Philly.com)

UP, UP AND AWAY: For the first time in his life, Brandon Belt's father stepped onto a plane, all to watch his son play a game in San Francisco. Darrell and wife live in Texas. (San Jose Mercury News)

PLANE SCARE: Tony La Russa and four players were flying to a charity event for La Russa when their plane's cabin failed to pressurize. The plane returned to the airport and did not climb above 10,000 feet. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

ESCOBAR IMPROVING: Yunel Escobar is taking encouraging steps back from a mild concussion suffered Wednesday. He could be back in the lineup as early as Sunday, but new concussion guidelines means he must undergo a final round of testing Saturday before he can take the field. (MLB.com)

RAMOS WINS JOB: Wilson Ramos will become the full-time starting catcher in Washington as Ivan Rodriguez's role is phased back. Don't be surprised to see Pudge eventually traded. (MLB.com)

ALZHEIMER'S: No matter who you are or what you did, no one deserves the agony of Alzheimer's. Yet, that's what Stan Musial is battling as a new biography of Stan the Man details. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

NO MORE HAT FOR LONGORIA: The New Era commercial with Evan Longoria losing his hat was rather popular last season, but this year New Era is going forward with Alec Baldwin from 30 Rock and John Krasinski from The Office, creating another solid commercial. (Big League Stew)

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Posted on: March 29, 2011 9:55 am
 

Pepper: Battered Brewers breath sigh of relief



By Matt Snyder


With Zack Greinke on the shelf, the Brewers badly need Shaun Marcum -- who missed his previous spring start with shoulder soreness and has some injury history -- to come out of camp healthy. He threw four innings Monday in his last spring outing and felt fine. (Brewers blog )

So that's the good news.

The bad news is the Brewers have been injury-riddled this spring -- they'll start with five players on the disabled list -- and it's exposed the fragile thin layer of major-league talent they have.

There is certainly reason for optimism in Milwaukee, because they have some really good players. They can hit the ball, have good starting pitching -- so long as everyone is healthy, that is -- and what appears to be a capable closer. But when you're trading for Sergio Mitre and Nyjer Morgan in the last few days of spring to shore up depth, that's hardly a flawless team. Injuries can bury this team, the spring should merely serve as a warning.

With the Reds' injury woes, Adam Wainwright going down and Cubs having obvious flaws, this seems like a race that will be determined by the team with the best luck in terms of health. And the Brewers are already starting off on the wrong foot, even if Marcum felt fine Monday night.

SAVING CASHNER:
The Cubs correctly named Andrew Cashner the fifth member of the starting rotation over the former albatross, Carlos Silva. There are concerns with Cashner's workload, however, as he's never thrown more than 111 1/3 innings in a season. As a full-time starter, he should be expected to go over 150. The Cubs have pointed out they will "constantly" monitor his load this season, in terms of pitches and innings, to ensure the long-term health of their former first-rounder. (Chicago Sun-Times )

PEREZ PUKES, IS PEEVED: So Indians closer Chris Perez threw up on the back-end of the mound in the ninth inning of a spring game Monday (Jordan Bastian via Twitter), but then threw out a tweet himself about it, saying, "all right, enough of all this Perez threw up bs, I had low blood sugar and was dizzy, and only water came up."

THE AMAZING ECKSTEINS: I'm not even going to try and do this justice. It's too long and too good. Just read the whole thing. David Eckstein's family has donated five kidneys to each other and another six more are likely to be needed. David hasn't taken a turn yet, but he's "on deck." (The Post Game )

PRIOR DETERMINED: Mark Prior was demoted all the way to Class-A after a spring that saw him put up a 1.17 ERA in 7 2/3 innings of work. He still feels like he's going to help the Yankees at some point this season, and manager Joe Girardi said, "I think he's got a pretty good shot." (ESPN New York )

OH JOSE: Jose Canseco did some nice work on Twitter Monday. Let's see ... he said ESPN is owned by Major League Baseball, so they lie. "You will never know the real truth is you keep listening to the media." (That one was weird for me because I have never, ever been told what I can or cannot write by anyone). And the cherry on top, this gem: "Just remember the media is write 20 percent of 50 percent of the time." That one was aptly followed by him accusing other people of being ignorant. This all came on the heels of the news that Canseco pulled a bait-and-switch at a charity boxing event. Of course, Canseco's whole reason for the tirade was that he wanted to see if anyone was smart enough to figure out what actually happened. And it's all the media's fault. The funny thing is, Twitter is a media that gives Canseco a forum to tell his side. Don't tell us to guess what happened. Don't take a few days to reveal what happened, as it looks like you're cooking up a story, Jose. If there's a different truth, just tell it. But that's the problem, isn't it? (Jose Canseco via Twitter)

MOST DEPRESSED? A website put together a list of the most depressed baseball cities among the 18 teams that haven't won the World Series in the past 20 years. Oddly enough, Washington D.C. checked in at the top. These types of things are pretty immeasurable, really, but I guess it's entertaining enough to look at this point. We're just killing time until opening day anyway by now. (via Ultimate Astros )

MATUSZ STRUCK, STILL OPTIMISTIC:
Orioles starting pitcher Brian Matusz was throwing a simulated game when he was struck in his left biceps by a line drive, forcing him to stop his session well early. It's fortunately just a bruise, as the Orioles aren't even going to go through precautionary X-Rays. He's had a rough spring, but still remains confident for the regular season. (MASN.com )

SALT RIVER FIELDS FOREVER: The Diamondbacks and Rockies shared the new Salt River Fields facility this spring and it has been all the rage from pretty much everyone who has seen the place. The attendance has shown the popularity, as the place has drawn pretty staggering numbers. The D-Backs have drawn over 189,000 fans, averaging 11,161 per game. The number is almost double last season's spring attendance for the Snakes. The Rockies have similar figures, bringing in 10,485 fans per game, just about double last season's number. The facility has set all kinds of attendance records, with the Diamondbacks ranking first in spring attendance and the Rockies checking in at No. 3 -- the Yankees were second. (MLB.com )

NO BRACKETS FOR YOU: With the gambling accusations against former clubhouse manager Charlie Samuels, the Mets have refrained from running any NCAA basketball tournament bracket competitions. Manager Terry Collins said there was no specific mandate to avoid it, but everyone just thought it would be a bad idea. They must have known how things were going to shake out, huh? (Newsday )

ON-DECK ACCOUNT: Remember Aaron Guiel? He played for the Royals from 2002-2006 and then a little bit for the Yankees late in '06. Well he plays in Japan now, and he was on deck in a NPB game in Yokohama when the big earthquake happened. He described the event from his point of view to Canadian Baseball Network .

LEYLAND ON 'PLAYER X:' By now everyone's surely heard of ESPN the Magazine's "Player X," in which an anonymous player writes about the sport in which he plays. The latest baseball entry, "Player X" took on Miguel Cabrera, specifically wondering why he doesn't pay someone to drive him when he's out drinking. Tigers manager Jim Leyland didn't care for the column, saying: “To me that’s a gutless (jerk) that doesn’t put his name to it. If somebody would have said, ‘Hey, this is Jim Leyland and this is what I say, he should do this or this, then that’s fine. But when you (another expletive) hide behind somebody else’s expense, that’s chicken (expletive) to me." (Detroit Free-Press ) I can see the logic in that. Since my name is on this, I'll ask the same question, though: How do any players ever get a DUI? Miguel Cabrera makes $20 million a year. Why can't he -- or anyone else in the league who has gotten (or will get) a DUI -- pay someone something like $50,000 a year to be his driver? It would make things easier on everyone -- provide a job to someone, avoid the questions of alcoholism, keep guys out of jail, etc. I just don't get it.

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