Tag:Blue JAys
Posted on: November 1, 2011 6:04 pm
Edited on: November 1, 2011 7:27 pm
 

Blue Jays' Tony LaCava turns down Orioles GM job

LaCava

By Evan Brunell


The Orioles' search for a general manager will continue after Blue Jays assistant GM Tony LaCava declined an offer to take over the Orioles.

“I'm working in a great place, a job that I love. It’s just as simple as that," LaCava told the Baltimore Sun by way of explanation."I really, really treasure my relationship with [Toronto] general manager, Alex Anthopoulos, and I really want to see this through with him."

This is a surprise, as Toronto was readying for LaCava's departure. The 50-year-old was meeting Orioles owner Peter Angelos for the first time on Monday, likely discussing the terms of his employment, the Baltimore Sun wrote. The Orioles were not doing a second round of interviews, so the fact LaCava was back in town and meeting with Angelos spoke volumes. He must not have liked what he heard.

Baltimore's GM job is not exactly seen as a plum job in baseball. The O's play in a very difficult division and arguably are the worst team in the division as far as resources are concerned, whether financial, organizationally, or major- and minor-league talent. In addition, Angelos is a meddling owner who still hasn't learned that the O's have struggled since the mid-1990s because of his over-involvement.

LaCava, for his part, tried to deflect that aspect of turning down the job by telling the Sun, “This was about the Toronto Blue Jays more than it is anything about the Orioles. ... They were classy in everything they did."

But this is a man that has waited about a decade for a GM job. There are only 30 GM jobs in the league and the fact LaCava turned down what would be his first GM job speaks volumes.

The O's have only interviewed three other candidates. One was Jerry DiPoto, who was hired as the Angels GM last week. The other two are Baltimore director of player development John Stockstill and Dodgers assistant GM De Jon Watson. The Orioles may re-open the field to interview candidates, especially now that the World Series is over. Stockstill isn't a well-known name and while Watson's name has surfaced in recent seasons as a potential GM candidate, he hasn't been a popular name. LaCava, of the three remaining candidates, was the clear top dog. MASN says Baltimore could interview Rangers' senior director of player personnel, A.J. Preller. Hometown candidate Thad Levine, who is Texas' assistant GM, could also receive consideration.

Unfortunately, it appears things are only backsliding in Baltimore. Ex-GM Andy MacPhail was able to wrest more control from Angelos than any other GM had, and for a while there, it looked like it was paying off. However, the last two years saw the organization stall, if not regress, in its progress and MacPhail chose to leave the organization despite Angelos' attempts for him to stay. The way the process has gone to interview a new GM, it appears as if what power MacPhail had was a one-time thing only and Baltimore is back to looking for someone to do Angelos' bidding.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeonBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 1, 2011 4:35 pm
Edited on: November 1, 2011 10:20 pm
 

Team-by-team AL free agency outlooks



By Matt Snyder


With open free agency set to hit us at 12:01 a.m. Thursday, it's worth taking a quick look at what every single team is going to be looking for. We've already done detailed breakdowns in the R.I.P. series, so here are some quick hitters for the American League:

Baltimore Orioles | R.I.P.
Needs: Could use a corner infielder, depending upon where they want to play Mark Reynolds (including DH). Pitching, starting and in relief.
Money to spend? They should have a decent amount. Between Derrek Lee, Vladimir Guerrero, Mike Gonzalez, Koji Uehara and Cesar Izturis, that's roughly $25 million coming off the books from the beginning of last season. Some arbitration raises are coming, but we'll see how much owner Peter Angelos wants to spend. The Orioles have already raised payroll about $20 million since 2008. Don't count out a run at Prince Fielder or some other big name.

Boston Red Sox | R.I.P.
Needs: Pitching, right field.
Money to spend? Will new GM Ben Cherington be more careful on big free agent deals after seeing some colossal failures in recent years? It's hard to tell, but if the Red Sox let both David Ortiz and Jonathan Papelbon walk, they'll be able to spend. The two combined to make over $24 million last year. J.D. Drew's $14 million is gone just as Jason Varitek and Tim Wakefield are free agents. A few arbitration raises should still leave the Red Sox about $30 million short of last season's payroll. So there's room to play.

New York Yankees | R.I.P.
Needs: Pitching, pitching, pitching
Money to spend? With Jorge Posada's hefty contract coming off the books, yes, you can expect the Yankees have money to spend. Do they go large and land C.J. Wilson? I'd guess there are serious discussions about doing so. He's left-handed, which is a great fit for Yankee Stadium. Maybe Mark Buehrle is a fall back and posting for Yu Darvish is entirely possible. One thing is for sure: Getting CC Sabathia nailed down before free agency began was huge.

More Free Agency
Position rankings
Tampa Bay Rays | R.I.P.
Needs: Catcher, first baseman, shortstop, bullpen help
Money to spend? Not much. The situation in Tampa Bay is dire, so if the Rays are really looking to shore up that many positions via free agency, it's going to have to be on the cheap. And they might even have to trade James Shields to do so. Trading B.J. Upton is a no-brainer in order to save money. In dealing those two, they could plug Desmond Jennings in center and Matt Moore in the rotation and then fill the holes cheaply with guys like Johnny Damon and Casey Kotchman (which they did last season).

Toronto Blue Jays | R.I.P.
Needs: All kinds of pitching, second base.
Money to spend? The belief is they have a lot of money to spend between this offseason and next. Do they make a big splash now or wait? They could make a run at Prince Fielder or David Ortiz, but the offense doesn't need near as much help as the pitching -- plus, with Edwin Encarnacion coming back 1B and DH seem to be filled. They will probably hit on a closer like Jonathan Papelbon or Ryan Madson. As for the second base crop, it's pretty thin. Maybe Ramon Santiago or Jamey Carroll? If they really wanted to go for it, they could move Brett Lawrie back to second base and go after Aramis Ramirez, but that's not happening.

Chicago White Sox | R.I.P.
Needs: To get younger
Money to spend? Not much. The White Sox had a huge payroll last season and got nothing to show for it. Paul Konerko, Adam Dunn, Alex Rios and Jake Peavy will make over $55 million combined and there don't appear to be any areas where a quick fix would make the White Sox a ton better than last year. Instead, they should stay away from free agency and instead start trading veterans to stock a barren farm system.

Cleveland Indians | R.I.P.
Needs: catcher or first base (depending on where they play Carlos Santana), left field (Michael Brantley likely moves to center with Grady Sizemore gone)
Money to spend? The Indians have a lot of good, young talent but it's all already arrived at the big-league level (or been traded away). So they're ready to make a move in the Central, as evidenced by trading for veteran Derek Lowe. There's some extra revenue from the increased attendance in 2011, but they still can't come close to affording Prince Fielder or Albert Pujols. Maybe Carlos Pena? He's a good defensive first baseman and hit 28 homers with 74 RBI and an .879 OPS if you lop off his dreadful start in 2011 (that listed stat line began May 3). If not Pena, Casey Kotchman is a decent fall back.

Detroit Tigers | R.I.P.
Needs: Second base and third base (or shortstop, with Jhonny Peralta shifting positions).
Money to spend? With some big contracts (like Magglio Ordonez and Carlos Guillen) coming off the books and a revenue stream from a season that saw the Tigers hit the ALCS, you can bet they'll be spending. Jose Reyes or Aramis Ramirez would work well, but it seems like a top-of-the-order guy makes more sense, considering Jim Leyland was forced to keep trotting strikeout machine Austin Jackson out in the leadoff spot and the Tigers already have Miguel Cabrera and Victor Martinez in the middle. Also, the Tigers could also go cheap in the infield and grab someone like Michael Cuddyer for right field. We'll see.

Kansas City Royals | R.I.P.
Needs: Starting pitching, relief pitching, bench depth
Money to spend? The Royals haven't yet made their move in the AL Central, so revenues haven't greatly increased just yet. They'll be able to spend some money, but mostly the type that can land spare parts while the Royals wait on the young wave to thrive. Reports have indicated general manager Dayton Moore wants to trade some of the Royals' many coveted prospects for a good starting pitcher, so expect K.C. to be more active in hot stove trade talk than in major free agency signings.

Minnesota Twins | R.I.P.
Needs: Closer, setup men, corner outfielders and to stay healthy
Money to spend? If the Twins bring back both Jason Kubel and Michael Cuddyer, they'll be a bit strapped for cash. If not, they'll have plenty to spend, as those two leaving along with Joe Nathan and Matt Capps frees up lots of money. Expect the Twins to be aggressive in seeking relief pitching help, even possibly willing to trade other pieces to shore up the back-end of the bullpen.

Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim | R.I.P.
Needs: Catcher (hmm, if only they didn't trade a certain postseason star), pitching depth
Money to spend? Nope, they're pretty much on lockdown, as owner Arte Moreno has said the payroll will decrease -- and they're already saddled with lots of huge veteran contracts. Even if they could find takers for some of the overpaid veterans, they'd have to give significant salary relief. As things stand, the Angels in 2012 probably greatly resemble the Angels of 2011.

Oakland Athletics | R.I.P.
Needs: An entire outfield and third base.
Money to spend? The A's have over $23 million in salary coming off the books, but the question is if Billy Beane attacks things in a similar manner to how he did last year with the offense. Several modest one-year contracts were handed out. Why not instead go young with Michael Taylor, Chris Carter and Brandon Allen while using the free agent money on one bigger bat (Aramis Ramirez? Carlos Beltran?)? The problem there lies in convincing a major free agent to play in Oakland, so the guess is Beane again signs a few cheaper guys like Josh Willingham and Hideki Matsui last season.

Seattle Mariners | R.I.P.
Needs: Pitching depth, offensive firepower.
Money to spend? There's a modest amount of money leaving the payroll while Ichiro is signed for $18 million in 2012 before he's done. So the Mariners could actually backload deals if they want to make a huge splash. Could they get crazy and go after two big offensive names? They've done so in the past (the Adrian Beltre and Richie Sexson signings). Expect to hear the Mariners in rumors for Prince Fielder and Jose Reyes, and probably trickling on down to the likes of Carlos Beltran and Jimmy Rollins. Now, whether or not they can convince any of those guys to sign, we'll see.

Texas Rangers | R.I.P.
Needs: Bullpen depth
Money to spend? A modest amount. It's likely the Rangers let C.J. Wilson walk and fill in the rotation either in-house (Neftali Feliz, Alexi Ogando, Scott Feldman) or by signing Japanese phenom Yu Darvish. From there, the Rangers could make Mike Adams the new closer and focus on setup men, or go after a free agent closer like Jonathan Papelbon or Ryan Madson. Keep in mind, the Rangers don't have to change much, considering they were one strike away from a World Series title twice and the overwhelming majority of the team is returning intact. Plus, the revenues from going to two consecutive World Series will give them the ability to increase the payroll should they wish.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: October 31, 2011 10:43 pm
Edited on: October 31, 2011 10:58 pm
 

Monday brings plethora of option decisions

By Evan Brunell

As baseball readies for free agency, numerous decisions on options are being made. Those either free up players to hit the market or tie them to their 2011 club for one more season. Sunday's list is right here. Let's take a look at what happened Monday...

AMERICAN LEAGUE
NATIONAL LEAGUE
View the free-agent tracker here.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeonBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: October 31, 2011 10:02 pm
Edited on: October 31, 2011 10:03 pm
 

Blue Jays bring Encarnacion back, dump Rauch

Encarnacion

By Evan Brunell


The Blue Jays have declined their club option on reliever Jon Rauch, but will bring DH Edwin Encarnacion back.

Rauch was one of several who tried to close games out for the Jays, a team that had trouble finding that stopper. Rauch wasn't quite the man, despite notching 11 saves. The righty allowed 11 homers after giving up just three in 2010, finishing the season out with a 4.85 ERA in 52 innings. His season was cut short by knee surgery in September, but pitched well enough to qualify as a Type B free agent. This may have been what led to declining the $3.75 million option on Rauch, which is a reasonable price. The Jays are one team that tries to collect as many draft picks as possible, and with Rauch fetching back a compensatory pick should (once) he signs elsewhere, it likely made more sense to Toronto to grab a different unspectacular middle reliever in order to perhaps draft the next great Blue Jay.

Encarnacion's return, meanwhile, jams up first base and DH, which could complicate any chance of getting any slugger who plays one of these positions. But bringing Encarnacion back for $3.5 million was a no-brainer. It wasn't before June 5, when the righty woke up with a .243/.275/.342 line, but netted three hits that night and played the rest of 2011 at a .286/.359/.505 clip, hammering 16 homers in 370 plate appearances. The Jays seem to have finally given up on Encarnacion at third, so he's limited to first and DH, although the club could stick him in left field a few times next season. Toronto has Adam Lind, Travis Snider and Eric Thames all vying for at-bats in varying degrees between first, left and DH, so Encarnacion will have to fight for playing time barring a trade.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeonBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: October 26, 2011 10:10 pm
Edited on: October 26, 2011 10:12 pm
 

Blue Jays could make run at David Ortiz

OrtizBy Evan Brunell

Could Big Papi be headed north of the border?

The Boston Herald writes that the Blue Jays "will not rule out" going after David Ortiz.

The Red Sox slugger is a free agent, coming off a bounceback year that saw him crack 29 homers and hit .309/.398/.554. While Ortiz isn't expected to get a lucrative contract, especially at age 35, he should end up with a two-year deal worth around $20-$25 million in free agency. That is well within Toronto's budget, which is looking for a left-handed complement to Jose Bautista. Ortiz would certainly fit the bill and give the club some serious thump in advance of the team trying to make a move in the division.

Ortiz knows the Blue Jays manager, John Farrell, from his time in Boston as a pitching coach and has always enjoyed Rogers Centre, where the Jays call home. Excluding Boston's Fenway Park, the lefty has slugged more homers in Rogers Centre than any other stadium, going deep 29 times and slashing .270/.357/.597 in the park. However, again, Ortiz is 35 and that might not fit with Toronto, whose window of opportunity is likely at least one more year away. Plus, Papi would be stuck at DH and prevent Toronto from cycling other players through the position. In addition, it would mean that one of Adam Lind, Travis Snider and Eric Thames would be squeezed out of playing time.

After the Red Sox's historic collapse, Ortiz was quoted as saying he was tired of dealing with the drama in Boston, but later said he wanted to return to the team. It's likely that he will, and new GM Ben Cherington said that he wouldn't rule out Papi re-upping with Boston during the five-day window of exclusivity teams have with their free agents following the World Series.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeonBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: October 26, 2011 2:12 pm
Edited on: October 26, 2011 4:41 pm
 

Free-agent postion rankings: Thin crop at 2B

Brandon Phillips

By C. Trent Rosecrans


For all free agency moves, check out the CBSSports.com free agency tracker.

Second base is hardly a marquee position -- there are some good players at the position, but at its core, it's a position of deficiencies. Second basemen generally aren't good enough defensively to play shortstop, or hit well enough to be a third baseman or outfielder. That's not to say there aren't some great players who play the position like Dustin Pedroia and Chase Utley, but it's not a marquee position, and it's even less so in this free agent market.

Brandon Phillips1. Brandon Phillips: If the Reds were to decide against exercising Phillips' $12 million option, he'd certainly be in demand. But that's not happening. Reds general manager Walt Jocketty has said he's planning on picking up Phillips' option, while Phillips prefers an extension. Phillips has said the Reds simply picking up the option on his contract would be a slap in the face -- but maybe one day I can be slapped in the face for $12 million. Phillips said the Reds won't get the "homeboy hookup" (otherwise known as the "hometown discount") in any extension talk. So while Phillips will be in a Reds uniform on opening day, the end of the season and beyond, that may be a question.
Possible teams: Reds

Jamey Carroll2. Jamey Carroll: Yep, Jamey Carroll is number two on this list -- which should tell you as much as you need to know about the remaining 11 names on this list. Carroll is a fine player, but nothing more than that. He hit .290/.359/.347 for the Dodgers this season and hasn't hit a home run since 2009. He did put up a .383 on-base percentage as a leadoff man, something that could make him much more attractive to potential suitors. Carroll could be a good second baseman (or shortstop) for somebody, but he's not exactly the type of player that's going to turn around the team or get a fanbase fired up.
Possible teams: Dodgers, White Sox, Royals, Diamondbacks, Rockies

Jerry Hairston Jr.3. Jerry Hairston Jr.: Hairston is one of the more versatile players in the game and also had a very good postseason, so good that someone may consider him an everyday player. Hairston played second, third, shortstop, left field and center field last season, but started each of the NLCS games at third base. He played 45 games for the Brewers and 75 for the Nationals in 2011, hitting .270/.344/.383 with five home runs overall.
Possible teams: Brewers, Rockies, Diamondbacks, Cardinals, Mets, Royals

Ramon Santiago4. Ramon Santiago: Santiago could play shortstop as well, increasing his value. This year was the first year he played mostly second base, starting 40 games at second and 22 at shortstop for the Tigers. Still, he doesn't exactly project as a first-division starter at either spot. He hit .260/.311/.384, not too far off his average in his 10 seasons in the big leagues with the Tigers and Mariners. He's most likely a utility infielder at this point in his career.
Possible teams: Twins, White Sox, Diamondbacks, Padres, Dodgers

Mark Ellis5. Mark Ellis: Ellis certainly earned brownie points for teams watching from afar when he gracefully stepped aside for the arrival of second baseman Jemile Weeks in Oakland and was then traded to Colorado. Ellis, a good defensive second baseman, struggled offensively in Oakland before the trade but hit quite a bit better in Colorado (imagine that). Ellis is likely to return to Colorado.
Possibile teams: Rockies, Diamondbacks, Dodgers

Aaron Hill6. Aaron Hill: The Diamondbacks have options for the next two seasons on Hill, but there's close to zero chance the team will pay him $8 million for next season. Still, Arizona has expressed interest in bringing back Hill, whom the Diamondbacks got in a change of scenery trade with the Blue Jays. Hill hit .315/.386/.492 with two homers in 33 games for the Diamondbacks after hitting just .225/.270/.313 for the Blue Jays.
Possible teams: Diamondbacks, Blue Jays, Cardinals

Aaron Miles7. Aaron Miles: After his disastrous turn in Chicago, Miles has rebounded pretty well the last two seasons. For the Dodgers in 2011, Miles hit .275/.314/.346 in 136 games. Miles will be 35 next season. The Dodgers have expressed some interest in bringing him back. Miles made $500,000 last season and should get a little bump, but don't look for anyone giving him a long-term deal.
Possible teams: 
Dodgers, Cardinals, Nationals

Jack Wilson8. Jack Wilson: Wilson finished last season with the Braves, playing shortstop and third base. he played mostly second base for the Mariners to start the season, but that was because the team had Brendan Ryan at short. Wilson, who has never had much of a bat, may be entering the stage of his career where he can serve as a late-inning defensive replacement at any of the infield positions.
Possible teams: White Sox, Royals, Brewers, Dodgers, Cardinals

Carlos Guillen9. Carlos Guillen: Let's just say Guillen will take a pay cut in 2012 after his four-year, $48 million contract with the Tigers has run out. In those four seasons, the Tigers got a .266/.345/421 hitter with 30 home runs and 12 stolen bases. At 35 in 2011, Guillen hit .232/.265/.368, playing second base and first base in just 28 games.
Possible teams: Blue Jays, Cardinals, Rockies, retirement

Kelly Johnson10. Kelly Johnson: Johnson was the other half of the Blue Jays-Diamondbacks underachiever swap. And like Hill, he responded well in his new home, hitting .270/.364/.417 in 33 games in Toronto, while hitting .209/.287/.412 with 18 homers in 114 games with Arizona. The Blue Jays are likely to offer Johnson arbitration, so he can take it or hit the free agent market. He's likely on the borderline between Type A and Type B, if a Type A, he'd almost be forced to take arbitration because his value on the free agent market would take a huge hit if a team had to give up a draft pick. But the class of second basemen is so weak, he may be able to go anyway. It's an interesting situation.
Possible teams: Blue Jays, Diamondbacks, Cardinals, Royals, Dodgers

Nick Punto11. Nick Punto: Punto hit .27 8/.388/.421 in a bounce-back year for the Cardinals, but was limited to just 166 plate appearances, so take that with a grain of salt. Punto's no longer an everyday player (if he ever really was), but is instead a utility player and there's always a place for that. He does add defensive value at most spots he plays, so there will be some demand.
Possible teams: Cardinals, White Sox, Mets, Nationals, Dodgers, Padres

Craig Counsell12. Craig Counsell: After the NLCS loss to the Cardinals, the Brewers utility man said he wasn't whether he'd return for a 17th season, but he'd certainly listen to offers. "When you're hitting .170 and you're 41 years old, you question yourself, there's no doubt," Counsell told me after the Brewers' loss to the Cardinals. It's a good question. He's had a very good career, but he did hit just .178/.280/.223 and tied a big league record with a 45 at-bat hitless streak.
Possible teams: Brewers, Diamondbacks, retirement

Jose Lopez13. Jose Lopez: The Marlins out righted Lopez to the minors in July, before calling him back up in August. With the Rockies and Marlins in 2011, he hit a combined .216/.245/.373.He did hit .273/.296/.597 with six home runs in 32 games (16 starts) after being called back up. He played third, second and first base. An All-Star in 2006 with the Mariners, Lopez will likely sign a minor-league contract to get into camp with someone, but he's no team's idea of an answer to any question other than who is on the travel roster for a split squad game.
Possible teams:
Nationals, Dodgers, Padres, White Sox, Royals, Mets

Free-agent position rankings: C | 1B | 2B | SS | 3B | OF | DH | SP | RP

Free-agent overall rankings: Position players | Pitchers

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: October 25, 2011 6:38 pm
Edited on: October 25, 2011 8:20 pm
 

Report: Boston unlikely to hire a current manager

Ben CheringtonBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Although there have been whispers about the Red Sox trying to hire Toronto manager John Farrrell to replace departed manager Terry Francona, the Boston Herald reports that it's a "longshot" the Red Sox would hire a current manager.

The Blue Jays changed a policy allowing its employees to interview for any opening, meaning Farrell won't be a candidate in Boston. But if the team isn't going to hire a sitting manager, that means the Rays' Joe Maddon, Padres' Bud Black and Indians' Manny Acta are out as well.

The Herald lists the Blue Jays' Don Wakamatsu, Dodgers' Tim Wallach, Indians' Sandy Alomar Jr., Phillies' Pete Mackanin, Brewers' Dale Sveum and Yankees' Tony Pena as possible candidates. Of those names, only Wakamatsu and Pena have held full-time managerial positions before. Mackanin has twice been an interim manager.

During his news conference on Tuesday, new Red Sox general manager Ben Cherington told reporters he expects to begin interview soon and has a list of candidates. He did say the team would like previous managerial experience, but wouldn't require it.

"Previous managerial experience would be a benefit, but we're not going to put ourselves in a box by requiring that," Cherington said. "We'll certainly consider those that have previous managerial experience, but also those who don't. We need the right person. I don't think we can afford to put ourselves in any sort of box in our effort to find the right person."

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: October 25, 2011 1:15 pm
Edited on: October 25, 2011 3:32 pm
 

Jays amend policy to prevent Farrell to Red Sox

FarrellBy Evan Brunell

In light of recent rumors that could have had Toronto manager John Farrell moving to a similar position with the Red Sox, the Blue Jays have altered their policy dealing with organizational change, the team said in a statement courtesy MLB.com.

"Due to the distraction caused by media speculation regarding our employee permission policy, the Toronto Blue Jays have amended their policy and will not grant permission for lateral moves," GM Alex Anthopoulous and president Paul Beeston said in a joint statement.

Previously, Toronto had no restrictions on anyone interviewing for another job in an organization, including lateral moves. Now, Toronto will not allow lateral moves, which cuts off Farrell's ability to become Sox skipper. Unless, as Angels broadcaster Victor Rojas jokes, the Red Sox name him "president of clubhouse operations," a joke as to how ex-Red Sox GM Theo Epstein became president of baseball operations in Chicago, instead of simply president.

Anthopolous later told Sportsnet.ca that the change wasn't made to combat the Red Sox specifically, but was also used to address future rumors on Farrell -- if not himself.

"Because of the way the policy was set up, we'll always be open to rumors and speculation and, ultimately, it has become a distraction for the club," he said. "In terms of fear to lose someone to a lateral move, there isn't a fear because again, I point back to what the policy is going forward. There's no fear at all because we have a policy in place."

Beeston told Anthopoulous that the previous policy, which allowed anyone to interview for any job at any time, "wasn't working," so a new policy was drawn up. It will allow the club to refer to the policy moving forward and not get into specifics, as well as avoid e-mails, which he said inundated the club over the last couple days following a Boston Globe report that Farrell might be hired as the new Sox manager.

Farrell addressed reports of moving to the Red Sox on Monday, saying he was "focused right now on preparing for what is best for the Blue Jays in 2012."

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeonBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com