Tag:Stephen Strasburg
Posted on: November 29, 2010 12:50 pm
Edited on: November 29, 2010 4:09 pm
 

Rookie all-stars announced


Topps announced its annual rookie all-star team Monday, and it's a pretty nice-looking lineup. It was a good year for rookies.

1B: Gaby Sanchez, Marlins
2B: Neil Walker, Pirates
3B: Danny Valencia, Twins
SS: Starlin Castro, Cubs
OF: Austin Jackson, Tigers
OF: Michael Stanton, Marlins
OF: Jason Heyward, Braves
C: Buster Posey, Giants
RHP: Stephen Strasburg, Nationals
LHP: Jaime Garcia, Cardinals
RP: Neftali Feliz, Rangers

-- David Andriesen

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: November 15, 2010 2:22 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 11:36 am
 

Feliz, Posey win Rookie honors

Buster Posey Rangers closer Neftali Feliz and Giants catcher Buster Posey are your Rookies of the Year. No surprise, really.

The only question about today's results was which deserving National League rookie would win. Buster Posey ended up winning, taking the award over Atlanta's Jason Heyward.

While I would have voted for Heyward, I have zero problem with Posey winning. Both were incredible. What strikes me as interesting is the voting results, as Posey won comfortably, getting 20 of the 32 first-place votes and finishing with a total of 129 points. Heyward got nine first-place votes and 107 total points. I honestly thought it would be closer.

Three voters didn't vote for either, one voter went with Cardinals starter Jaime Garcia, while two voted for Gaby Sanchez.

The American League spread was about the same, as the National League. Feliz received 20 first-place votes and finished with 122 points. Tigers center fielder Austin Jackson finished second, with eight first-place votes and 98 total points. Twins third baseman Danny Valencia was third.

Pedro Feliz The difference, as discussed last week, was the caliber of candidates in both leagues. Feliz had a good year, but he's a closer, and that's a different role. Just for the record, let's look at the stats from the American League Rookie of the Year:

69 1/3 IP, 43 H, 21 R, 21 ER, 18 BB, 71 K, 2.73 ERA, .880 WHIP

Not bad numbers. Now let's look at a rookie in the National League who didn't garner a single vote.

68 IP, 56 H, 25 R, 22 ER, 17 BB, 92 K, 2.91 ERA, 1.074 WHIP

How about that? How did that guy not even get considered for the National League Rookie of the Year?

That's because he got hurt -- and he was a starter.

Stephen Strasburg made just 12 starts, but still pitched nearly as many innings as Feliz, who was the Rangers' closer. He didn't have 40 saves.

That said, Feliz definitely deserved the award.

The voting:
National League (points)
Buster Posey 129
Jason Heyward 107
Jaime Garcia 24
Gaby Sanchez 18
Neil Walker 3
Starlin Castro 3
Ike Davis 2
Jose Tabata 1
Jonny Venters 1

American League
Neftali Feliz 122
Austin Jackson 98
Danny Valencia 12
Wade Davis 11
John Jaso 3
Brandon Boesch 3
Brian Matusz 3

The National League Cy Young Award will be announced tomorrow.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 6, 2010 3:19 pm
 

Seriously, there's live baseball on tonight

Dustin Ackley
Don't tell the guys over at the college football blog I told you this, but you really don't have to watch college football today. There's actual live baseball on TV. Good baseball, even.

The Arizona Fall League Rising Stars Game is on MLB Network at 9 p.m. Eastern. The Arizona Fall League is where organizations send their best prospects, and Rising Stars is essentially the AFL all-star game, so there are some serious players on the rosters. In 2010, 28 of the 50 players on last year's Rising Stars rosters played in the majors, including Stephen Strasburg, Buster Posey (sorry, World Champion Buster Posey), Mike Leake and Starlin Castro.

There are 19 former first-round picks on the rosters this year, including 2009 overall No. 2 Dustin Ackley (pictured) of the Mariners and former Top 5 picks Eric Hosmer (Royals), Josh Vitters (Cubs) and Tony Sanchez (Pirates).

The scheduled starting pitchers are the Royals' Mike Montgomery and the Yankees' Manny Banuelos. If you want to check out whether any of your team's prospects are playing, complete rosters can be found here.

-- David Andriesen

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: October 26, 2010 4:46 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 11:25 am
 

Nationals changing uniform

Stephen Strasburg The Washington Nationals are expected to fix their mis-matched uniforms, unveiling a unified look on Nov. 10, according to the Dan Steinberg of the Washington Post.

The Nationals will show off three new styles of uniforms, Steinberg writes.

The problem with the Nationals goes way back -- where originally the team wanted a block W on their hat, but Major League Baseball insisted on the Senators-style cursive W as a link to the past. Not that it wasn't a good choice, it's one of the better lids in baseball, it's just that it didn't match the blocky font used on the rest of the home uniform.

Steinberg reports the block Nationals on the home jersey will be replaced. The road uniform (at least the gray jersey) was more unified, with a script "Washington" across the chest. The red third jersey had the blocky DC logo.

More importantly for the Nationals, all your Strasburg jerseys will be out of date and you'll need new ones. So step right up and get ready for them to change again once Bryce Hunter makes his debut and sells a ton of the next style of jersey.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: October 8, 2010 12:56 am
Edited on: October 8, 2010 3:00 pm
 

R.I.P. Nationals: Strasburg goes down to injury

RIP As the sports world waits for the crowning of a champion, 22 other teams are busy preparing for spring training. What went wrong for these teams, and what does 2011 hold? MLB Facts and Rumors here at CBS Sports will be answering those questions through all of October. Remember Strasmas? Well, the Washington Nationals got some coal.

It's not often a team with 90-plus losses has something to look forward to, but the Nationals sure do: 2011 being over.

You see, when 2012 opens, the Nationals will have phenom ace Stephen Strasburg fully healthy, likely with a few late-season 2011 rehab starts under his belt and a young team ready to go after the division.

Until then? More losing in the nation's capital.

WHAT WENT WRONG

The team lost 93 games. A lot went wrong. The most notable, as is to no one's surprise, is Stephen Strasburg getting knocked out for about a year with Tommy John surgery. Of course, if Rob Dibble had his way, Strasburg would probably have pitched every remaining game of the Nats after first suffering the injury.

Now that the obligatory Dibble insult is out of the way, what else went wrong? Ivan Rodriguez, Adam Kennedy and Cristian Guzman all struggled with OPS' south of .700, dragging down the Nats' offense. On the pitching side, only Livan Hernandez and Strasburg had ERAs under 4.00. The other five who received at least 13 starts? 4.65 (John Lannan), 5.13 (Craig Stammen), 5.15 (Luis Atilano), 5.56 (Scott Olsen) and 6.60 (Jason Marquis). Yikes.

Unfortunately, the GM in Mike Rizzo is responsible for a colossal mistake in not trading Adam Dunn. Many teams were hot to trot over the lefty, with even the White Sox striking to acquire Edwin Jackson because it was thought the Nats were interested in the starter. No trade was achieved because Rizzo felt that the offers weren't commensurate with what he could get in compensation draft picks. Alas, there is no guarantee the Nats end up with a first-rounder, and it is a large step to say that someone yet to be drafted holds that much value over someone in the system, already signed, with the bonus out of the way.

Stephen Strasburg WHAT WENT RIGHT

Although Strasburg's (photo, right) injury definitely belongs in the "wrong" column, it also belongs in the "right" one as well. Why? Because Strasburg zipped through the minors and unveiled a filthy arsenal once he hit the majors with a fastball sniffing 100 and an absolutely devastating arsenal of breaking pitches. Washington has a Cy Young contender for years.

If Strasburg is looking for hope to return from TJ surgery, he can check out Jordan Zimmermann, who made 10 rehab starts in the minors after going under the knife last season. He made seven starts down the stretch and showed enough that the potential he displayed when he first came up is still there.

The Nats astutely picked up closer Matt Capps for a bargain in free agency, saw him excel as a closer and flipped him for the catcher of the future in Wilson Ramos -- all while promoting their own stud prospect reliever in Drew Storen, who proved he can close for years to come. Speaking of the bullpen, Tyler Clippard and Sean Burnett pretty much came from nowhere to establish what should be a nice bullpen for the Nats in 2011. Miguel Batista, a veteran journeyman, also had what figures to be his last quality year.

Mike Morse, a Quad-A player, pounded 15 home runs in 266 at-bats, and the Nats may have suddenly found a new power-hitter which will ease the sting of the eventual loss of Adam Dunn.

Lastly, no "what went right" selection is complete without the ageless Livan Hernandez, who improbably finished with a 3.66 ERA, tossing 211 2/3 innings at 35. Swan song? Probably, given he stumbled in the second half. Still awesome.

HELP ON THE WAY

The Nationals already promoted Storen and Ramos, so they technically don't belong here, but bear with me. The 22-year-old Storen, as previously mentioned, is Washington's closer of the future while Ramos figures to split time with Pudge behind the dish in 2011. There's another catcher actually on the way as well in Jesus Flores, a Rule 5 pick all the way back in 2007.

Unfortunately, Flores missed all of 2010 and most of 2009 due to injury, but he could eventually give the Nats an incredible tandem in Flores and Ramos. And the team has a top catching prospect down on the farm in Derek Norris. Now that's depth. (But ask the Rangers how much their vaunted catching depth worked out for them this season.)

Danny Espinosa also saw late-season action for the Nats, but impressed along with fellow preseason top prospect Ian Desmond, who manned short. Espinosa will slot in at second and give the Nats an exciting, young double play combo.
 
Adam Dunn EXPECTATIONS FOR 2011

The Nats have reached the point where they can tentatively start expecting to contend. That means a 90-loss season won't be accepted in 2011 and would certainly spell the demise of skipper Jim Riggleman, even sans Strasburg. Although the free-agent machinations of the team (especially to replace Dunn) will go along way towards managing expectations.

The team won't harbor any illusions that the squad can finish .500, even if Dunn returns, but finishing in the neighborhood of 77-85 figures to be the goal behind the scenes.

SUGGESTIONS FOR 2011

The Nationals seem pretty set on moving on from Adam Dunn (photo, right) due to his horrendous defense and skyrocketing contract. One player the Nats may want to peek at is Carlos Pena, coming off a year where he hit below the Mendoza Line. He has proven, however, that he can hit significantly better than that. (His career average is .241 -- wouldn't exactly call that good, but a darn sight better than .196.) And the power is certainly still there, something Washington needs. Pena is also gifted with the glove. So let's see: down season making him cheap, power and a good glove. Works for me.

The team also needs to figure out its rotation. Right now, Hernandez, Zimmermann, Lannan and Marquis figure to take up the first four spots. Stammen and Atilano could fight for the No. 5 spot but the team could really use a solid free-agent option who is long on leadership but a little long in the tooth as well to depress his price. What the Nats need to do is avoid multi-year deals, though -- there wasn't ever any reason to hand Marquis two years, and there won't be a reason to hand someone like Kevin Millwood two years. Stick to one year deals around $6-8 million, and the Nats can find someone just fine.

2011 PREDICTION

While Rizzo seems like a solid general manager, his track record is less than stellar. Combine that with the loss of Strasburg, and the Nationals seem headed to another 90-loss season in 2011. Check back in 2012, though.

Check out the rest of the R.I.P. reports here.

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .



Posted on: September 28, 2010 5:01 pm
Edited on: September 28, 2010 5:37 pm
 

Strasburg says recovery is 'boring'

Stephen Strasburg Nationals pitcher Stephen Strasburg held a conference call reporters on Tuesday, updating his status since having Tommy John surgery on Sept. 3.

Strasburg said with his time off, he's returned to class and hopes to get his degree from San Diego State, which would be great if this whole baseball thing doesn't work out.

As for his recovery, he said he hasn't been too surprised by anything.

"The more boring it is, the better," he said, according to Mark Zuckerman of NatsInsider.com .

Strasburg said he's been watching the Nationals and it's tough to watch the team struggle without him. Still, he feels his rookie year was a success.

"A great season," he said. "It's unfortunate for this to happen. But I was out there. I stirred up the baseball world well enough to have more people become Nats fans. And I know they're going to be there when I come back in a year."

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .

Category: MLB
Posted on: September 21, 2010 12:54 pm
 

Strasburg underground in recovery

Stephen Strasburg Stephen Strasburg has gone from everywhere to nowhere -- shying away from everyone, including his pitching coach.

"[Strasburg] called me the other day when I was on the way to the ballpark. But I missed it, and when I went to call him back, he didn't answer again," Nationals pitching coach Steve McCatty told the Washington Post . "Maybe I should take a hint."

The Post 's Dave Sheinin has a good story on trying to get in touch with Strasburg for a story and the pitcher's quest for privacy.

Strasburg has traded texts with reliever Drew Storen, but that's about all the contact he's had with the Nationals since his season-ending surgery earlier this month. And it's fine with the Nationals.

"We had to tell ourselves he'd be back in 12 months, and now it's 11," team president Stan Kasten -- who hasn't talked to Strasburg, either -- said.

Anyway, it's a good read. It doesn't mean much, Strasburg doesn't need to be around the team during his rehab and it doesn't really matter if he's close to his teammates or not. But because of who he is, his recovery will be of interest to the media and fans.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .

Posted on: August 27, 2010 7:44 pm
 

Dibble defends Strasburg, himself

On Monday, Rob Dibble went on Sirius XM MLB Network Radio and said Stephen Strasburg that he should "suck it up" and continue pitching through pain.

Rob Dibble Friday, after Strasburg was diagnosed with serious arm trouble, Dibble took time from his "vacation " to backpedal. From the Washington Post 's D.C. Sports Bog , here's how Dibble tried to defend himself:
"He's an absolute animal when he's on the field," Dibble said. "And to take my comments from Monday, my comments were made about a healthy, 100 percent, strong, strapping kid. And it was more so directed as a pep talk, it was never directed towards Stephen in general, it was more my own opinion. So on a baseball only, year-round show, on MLB Network Radio, it was more baseball-generated jargon by myself, my partner and the listeners.

"Now, to have someone transcribe that, twist it and say Dibble's telling Strasburg to suck it up, that wasn't the gist of the conversation. And to have sick individuals twist it to try to make me look bad, that's fine. You can hate on me all you want.

"But now there's a bunch of sick individuals in cyberspace that are deriving some kind of sick pleasure from this injury to this young man. This young man doesn't deserve any of that. He doesn't even deserve to have me in the same breath. What he deserves is people to just understand that it's a devastating injury to any athlete, especially one of his caliber."
I'm not sure if Dibble understands that a transcription is just writing down what he said -- and he said that Strasburg should "suck it up." It was much easier back in his day as a player to play the "I was misquoted" game, but when you're part of the media and your words can live forever on the internet, you should be aware of the power that they have.

His defense was that he was talking as if Strasburg was "100 percent, strong, strapping kid" -- but he wasn't 100 percent, that's why he had been put on the disabled list. As the Nationals' color commentator, he should know this as well as anyone. No, instead it was another of the macho attempts to tell thers how much tougher it was for him "back in the day." It's funny how so many in the media get accused for being "jealous" of athletes, while the former athletes are often more jealous because they didn't play in a time when they could make as much money.

To think that people are happy because it proves Dibble wrong says quite a bit about Dibble's self-centered worldview. If anyone is actually happy about Strasburg's injury, it's because they're sick and twisted -- not because it "proves" anything about a TV commentator.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .



 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com