Tag:White Sox
Posted on: October 22, 2011 3:28 pm
Edited on: October 24, 2011 4:51 pm
 

Free-agent position rankings: Papelbon leads RP



By C. Trent Rosecrans
 

With the free agent reliever market, it always seems to be buyer-beware, but every year teams overspend for closers and setup men. While not exactly a bumper crop this year, there are some good arms available, even if the top closers would all prefer to stay with their current teams. Still, we all know those preferences can go out the window when a higher offer comes.

Jonathan Papelbon1. Jonathan Papelbon: After a disappointing 2010, Papelbon returned to form in 2011, despite recording his lowest save total (31) since becoming the Red Sox closer. Not only was his ERA (2.94) down from 2010, he had his best strikeout rate (12.2 per nine innings) since 2007 and lowest walk rate (1.40 per nine innings) since 2008. His xFIP was 2.16, the lowest of his career. At 31, he's still an elite closer and the best available on the market. The Red Sox had been said to be interested in bringing him back and they still have the payroll to absorb a high-priced closer. Still, don't expect Papelbon to take a home-town discount.
Possible teams:  Red Sox, Cubs, Angels, Phillies

Heath Bell2. Heath Bell: When the Padres decided not to trade Bell during the season, it appeared he would be staying in San Diego. However, when the season ended with Bell not getting an extension, things became less sure. Now, Jed Hoyer is off to the Cubs and Josh Byrnes is in as the new GM. With this much change, things could easily change for Bell, who has said all along he'd prefer to stay in San Diego. The Padres may prefer to spend their money elsewhere. Bell is 34, but coming off his third straight 40-save season. One thing that could be troubling for a team is his falling strikeout rate. After striking out 10.2 per nine innings in 2009 and 11.1 in 2010, he struck out a career-low 7.3 per nine innings in 2011. His strikeout-to-walk ration was a career-low 2.43, although that was due to the lower strikeout numbers instead of more walks. Any team considering spending big money on him will have to seriously think about his age and if he's worth what he may command based on gaudy save numbers. He's also been aided by pitching at spacious Petco Park. The Padres may decide they don't need an All-Star closer and their money could be better spent elsewhere. Bell has said he would accept arbitration if offered.
Possible teams: Padres, Cardinals, Phillies, Mets, Orioles

Ryan Madson3. Ryan Madson: After several attempts earlier in his career to serve as a closer, Madson finally showed the ability to close out games in 2011, finishing with 32 saves in 34 opportunities. He's said he'd prefer to stay in Philadelphia, but that's easy to say during the season. A Scott Boras client, the Nationals have to be considered in the mix for Madson, who struck out 62 batters in 60 2/3 innings, while walking just 16 batters.
Possible teams: Phillies, Nationals, Red Sox

Jose Valverde4. Jose Valverde: The Tigers hold a $9 million club option on Valverde, which is pretty reasonable for a guy who led the majors with 49 saves and didn't blow a single save all season. Valverde's last outing was far from ideal, allowing four earned runs in 1 1/3 innings of Game 4 of the ALCS, but he's still an elite closer (if not exactly the most comfortable guy to watch). Valverde would command big bucks on the open market, but it seems highly unlikely he'll be there.
Possible teams: Tigers

Francisco Cordero5. Francisco Cordero: The Reds probably won't pick up his $12 million option, but he could still stay a Red. Cordero's been a stabilizing influence on the Reds bullpen in his four years in Cincinnati, but for a team like the Reds, it makes little sense to have a closer as the highest-paid player. Reds general manager Walt Jocketty and Cordero have both publicly said they'd like to work out an extension for him to stay in Cincinnati. It's similar to what the Reds did with Bronson Arroyo last offseason. The team is moving Aroldis Chapman to the rotation, so there's no real in-house candidate to fill in for Cordero if he leaves, so it makes sense to work out a deal. That said, someone could still pop in and make a bigger offer. The Brewers thought they had a deal with Cordero before he left for the Reds, so history could repeat itself.
Possible teams: Reds, Nationals, Mets, Orioles, Blue Jays

Francisco Rodriguez6. Francisco Rodriguez: After being traded to the Brewers, Rodriguez was not used as the team's closer, and said as a free agent, he'd like the opportunity to close again. That's not going to come in Milwaukee, where John Axford has established himself as the Brewers closer. However, after the Brewers' loss in the NLCS, owner Mark Attanasio made sure to point out just how important Rodriguez was to the team's bullpen and how much the club appreciated what he brought to the team. Although he's clearly not going to be the closer in Milwaukee, money talks -- and enough money and he may decide he can set up Axford. Sure, he spoke of being frustrated about not closing in Milwaukee during the year, but seeing the market could open his mind to other propositions.
Possible teams: Brewers, Cardinals, Orioles, Nationals, Phillies

Kyle Farnsworth7. Kyle Farnsworth: Fransworth more than lived up to his one-year deal last season, rewarding the Rays for taking a chance on him with 25 saves and a 2.18 ERA. He struck out 51 in 57 2/3 inning and had a career-best 0.988 WHIP and also his lowest walk rate of his career (1.9 BB/9). He made $2.6 million last season and the Rays have a $3.3 million club option (with a $650,000 buyout). It's basically a no-brainer to pick it up. Even if he doesn't repeat his 2011 numbers, he has the type of arm some team will want at the deadline to fortify a bullpen.
Possible teams: Rays, Mets, Marlins

Joe Nathan8. Joe Nathan: It's unlikely the Twins pick up Nathan's $12.5 million option -- that's just too rich for a guy pitching in just 48 games after missing the entire 2010 season because of Tommy John surgery. Still, both the Twins and Nathan are said to have interest in the closer returning to Minnesota. The 36-year-old has 260 of his 261 career saves in a Twins uniform and it's hard to imagine the two sides not working something out.
Possible teams: Twins

Kerry Wood9. Kerry Wood: The 34-year-old has already said he will either return to the Cubs in 2012 or retire. Count on the former. Wood was steady in the bullpen in 2011, striking out 57 in 51 innings and also showed no need to be the closer. Steady set-up men are something every team needs, and the Cubs as much as any other team. Wood took a below-market deal to return to the Cubs last season, earning just $1.5 million, and he may be open to doing it again. If so, it seems like a no-brainer to bring him back.
Possible teams: Cubs, retirement

Jeremy Affeldt10. Jeremy Affeldt: Affeldt is a left-handed reliever, but he's not just a left-handed specialist. Sure, his numbers against lefties are better (they hit just .144/.206/.200 against him), but he can also stay in and do a good job against right-handers. That versatility adds to his value on the mariet. He's been part of the very good Giants bullpen and expect him to stay there. San Francisco has a $5 million option on him after he earned $4.5 each of the past two seasons. He's earned the pay bump with his solid numbers. If the Giants don't exercise his option, they'll likely work out a multi-year deal with the team.
Possible teams: Giants

Jonathan Broxton11. Jonathan Broxton: Coming off a disappointing 2010, the hard-throwing right-hander appeared in just 14 games and underwent arthroscopic surgery on his right elbow in September to remove a bone spur and loose bodies. Once an All-Star, Broxton's first year of free agency will likely end with a one-year, incentive-laden contract. Broxton is just 27, but if he's no longer throwing 99 mph, what exactly is his worth? It's unlikely he'll get a job as a closer, but will have the opportunity to prove himself in the spring. The Dodgers appear ready to wash their hands of Broxton, despite the right-hander's statements he'd like to return.
Possible teams: Anyone but the Dodgers

Arthur Rhodes12. Arthur Rhodes: Rhodes has said he wants to pitch one more season and then retire. Rhodes has pitched for nine clubs in his career, including two this season -- the Cardinals and Rangers. While disappointing in Texas, Rhodes has rebounded with the Cardinals after being designated for assignment by the Rangers. Tony La Russa loves playing matchups, so it wouldn't be a shock to see him stay in St. Louis. 
Possible teams: Cardinals, Reds, Cubs, Orioles, Blue Jays

Jon Rauch13. Jon Rauch: Rauch had 11 saves for the Blue Jays, pitching in 53 games for the Blue Jays this season. Toronto has a $3.75 million option on the 6-foot-10 right-hander, which is affordable enough. Rauch gave up 11 home runs, the most he's allowed since 2008. While a former closer, he's not exactly anyone's idea of a closer going forward. 
Possible teams: Blue Jays, Twins, Braves, Nationals

Darren Oliver14. Darren Oliver: The 41-year-old left-hander has said he'd like to pitch one more year. His 2011 proves he can still do it, appearing in 61 games and putting up a 2.29 ERA. His splits against left-handers and right-handers weren't too far off, with only his strikeout rates really spiking against lefties. He had 23 strikeouts of lefties in 94 plate appearances and 21 against right-handers in 121 plate appearances. Righties had an OPS of .594 against him, lefties .587. He's spent 10 of his 18 seasons in Texas in three stints. It seems like a perfect fit for him to return.
Possible teams: Rangers, Cardinals

Jason Frasor15. Jason Frasor: The White Sox hold a $3.75 million option for 2012, but the right-hander struggled after being part of the trade that sent him to his hometown at the trade deadline. Frasor was part of the massive three-team trade that sent Colby Rasmus to the Blue Jays and Edwin Jackson, Marc Rzepczynski and Octavio Dotel to St. Louis. In 20 appearances for the White Sox, he had a 5.09 ERA, but did strike out more than a batter an inning (20 strikeouts in 17 2/3 innings). He had a 2.98 ERA in 44 appearances for the Blue Jays. 
Possible teams: White Sox, Blue Jays, Diamondbacks

Brad Lidge16. Brad Lidge: The Phillies declined a $12.5 million option on their former closer, giving him a $1.5 million buyout. Lidge missed most of the season with a shoulder strain, but did pitch well upon his return, putting up just a 1.40 ERA in 25 appearances, striking out 23 in 19 1/3 innings. Lidge has said he's open to returning as a set-up man, but it appears his days of closing for the Phillies are done, even with Ryan Madson as a free agent. Still, Philadelphia needed several closers to get through the season and having Lidge back could be a good backup plan. Neither side has ruled out a return for Lidge at Citizen's Bank Park.
Possible teams: Phillies, Orioles, Dodgers, Angels

Dan Wheeler17. Dan Wheeler: The Red Sox hold a $3 million option on the right-hander who will be 34 next season. After coming over from the Rays, Wheeler put up a 4.38 ERA out of the Red Sox bullpen. Wheeler spent some time on the disabled list with  a calf strain and then was unavailable down the stretch with forearm stiffness. His health will be major issue Boston's decision to bring him back. If deemed healthy, it would seem he'd have a good chance of returning to the Red Sox. Wheeler had a better xFIP (3.71) than ERA, with a high BABIP (batting average on balls in play) than he did in either of the past three seasons (.272).
Possible teams: Red Sox, Phillies, Cardinals, Dodgers, Angels

Frank Francisco18. Frank Francisco: Francisco is a Type B free agent, and the Blue Jays will likely offer him arbitration. The 32-year-old right-hander came over in the Mike Napoli trade and picked up 17 saves for the Blue Jays, putting up a 3.55 ERA in 54 games. He struck out 53 in 50 2/3 innings, walking 18. He's not exactly anyone's first choice for a closer, but he could go into a camp and compete for that job, or at least be a fill-in while some team's closer is injured.
Possible teams: Blue Jays, Nationals, Astros, Padres, Phillies

Chad Qualls19. Chad Qualls: San Diego is expected to decline the $6 million option on Qualls. Qualls appeared in 77 games for the Padres in 2011, putting up a 3.51 ERA in San Diego. The Padres are reportedly interested in bringing him back, just not at $6 million. He thrived at Petco Park, earning a 2.09 ERA at home and 5.05 on the road, so it's not a stretch to expect that he would have interest in returning to the Padres.
Possible teams: Padres, Diamondbacks, Nationals, Angels

Matt Capps20. Matt Capps: Just 28, the right-hander is a former closer for the Pirates, Nationals and Twins, but saw his strikeout rate (4.7 per nine innings) and fastball velocity (92.9 mph) drop this year and his ERA rise to 4.25, hardly the way you want to enter free agency. Capps made $7.15 million last season, earning 15 saves for Minnesota. He'll take a pay cut in 2012, likely signing another one-year deal, hoping to re-establish his worth. 
Possible teams: all of them

Free-agent position rankings: C | 1B | 2B | SS | 3B | OF | DH | SP | RP

Free-agent overall rankings: Position players | Pitchers

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: October 21, 2011 4:48 pm
 

Players association announces award nominees

By C. Trent Rosecrans

For those who love to debate awards selections, the players association has announced its finalist for the Players Choice Awards, voted on by the players. The winners will be announced Nov. 3 on MLB Network.

So, because you can't wait, here are your nominees:

American League
Outstanding player: Jose Bautista (Blue Jays), Adrian Gonzalez (Red Sox), Curtis Granderson (Yankees)
Outstanding pitcher: James Shields (Rays), Justin Verlander (Tigers), Jered Weaver (Angels)
Outstanding rookie: Jeremy Hellickson (Rays), Eric Hosmer (Royals), Mark Trumbo (Angels)
Comeback player: Bartolo Colon (Yankees), Jacony Ellsbury (Red Sox), Casey Kotchman (Rays)

National League
Outstanding player: Ryan Braun (Brewers), Matt Kemp (Dodgers), Justin Upton (Diamondbacks)
Outstanding pitcher: Roy Halladay (Phillies), Ian Kennedy (Diamondbacks), Clayton Kershow (Dodgers)
Outstanding rookie: Freddie Freeman (Braves), Craig Kimbrel (Braves), Vance Worley (Phillies)
Comeback player: Lance Berkman (Cardinals), Jose Reyes (Mets), Ryan Vogelsong (Giants)

Overall
Player of the Year: Gonzalez, Granderson, Verlander
Man of the Year: Paul Konerko (White Sox), Adam Wainwright (Cardinals), Michael Young (Rangers)

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: October 21, 2011 2:25 pm
 

Braves name Greg Walker hitting coach

Greg WalkerBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Former White Sox hitting coach Greg Walker will become the Braves' third hitting coach in the last three years, the team announced on Friday.

Former hitting coach Larry Parrish was fired after one year following the Braves' September collapse.

Walker is a Georgia native who spent the last 8 1/2 seasons as the Chicago hitting coach. He resigned after the 2011 season.

"I realized my shelf life, or whatever you want to call it, in Chicago was over," Walker said. "We had a good run there, but it became obvious there was time for a change. I felt like it was time to move on. When the Braves job came open, it was obviously one I would covet.

Scott Fletcher will serve as Walker's assistant, preparing advanced scouting reports before each series. He will replace an advance scout, doing all the work off of computer instead of an advance scout on the road.

"It's someone to help out daily on the field and do more advance work, so you can do more in-game and in-series adjustments because you have someone in the clubhouse who is familiar with the adjustments the other team is making as opposed to having your advance scout in the next season," Braves general manager Frank Wren said.

Fletcher has also known Jason Heyward since the Braves' outfielder was 12 years old, when Fletcher's son was on the same team as Heyward.

Walker said he's always used an assistant hitting coach, even if that person didn't have that same title.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: October 18, 2011 10:20 am
 

Guillen fires back at White Sox pitching coach

Ozzie GuillenBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Chicago just can't quit Ozzie Guillen.

And can you blame him? If you're a columnist, just call him up and you've got a story (I can't quit him, either). The latest has the Marlins manager lashing out at his former pitching coach, Don Cooper. Two weeks ago Cooper said he signed an extension with the White Sox without Guillen getting a deal because Guillen allegedly told management to "let (the coaches) sweat" when asked by general manager Ken Williams about extensions.

Guillen lashed back on Monday, talking to the Chicago Sun-Times' Joe Cowley, saying, "Cooper needs to look in the mirror. He didn't back-stab me. I know who he is. He back-stabbed his fellow coaches, the guys he worked with for years. You got family? That's fine. Everyone does. We all knew Coop was Kenny's (expletive deleted, but suffice to say it refers to a gender of canine).

"Look, Coop is not a good coach; he's a great coach. But Coop is Coop. He doesn't worry about anyone; he worries about himself. I stuck up for my coaches like a (expletive deleted, but it's two words, the first being mother).

"I told [the White Sox] I want to keep my coaching staff, and I never lied to the media. I talked to Jerry Reinsdorf maybe five times [about extensions for the coaches]. The reason I was so comfortable with the Sox was the coaches. Let them sweat it out? Coop was Kenny's guy, and my staff knew that. We all know what he really is."

Guillen did say he was happy for the White Sox and new manager Robin Ventura -- "the Sox picked the right guy," he told Cowley.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: October 12, 2011 5:29 pm
Edited on: October 12, 2011 5:40 pm
 

Pierzynski has had beers during games, too

By Matt Snyder

OK, maybe we need to start going with Beergate or something, to make it easier to reference. But the revelation earlier Wednesday that several Red Sox pitchers drank beer in the clubhouse during games has spawned several side stories, including that White Sox catcher A.J. Pierzynski believes sometimes you just need a beer. He said as much on the "Dan Patrick Show" Wednesday, when asked if he'd ever had beer during games (via ChicagoTribune.com):
“Yes, absolutely I have before,” Pierzynski said. ”Sometimes you’re just really struggling and you just say, ‘Hey, you know what, I need something to calm me down and let’s have a beer.’ A couple of us will do it together, and sometimes it works out."

"It's just, sometimes you just need a rally beer. If you’re in extra innings and you’re in about the 15th inning and you really need to get going again, that sometimes works for you."
No word on whether or not the beer is what makes Pierzynski just so darn mean -- remember, he was voted the "meanest" player in baseball -- but it's a bit surprising to hear about someone drinking while still playing. I wasn't near as taken aback by the Red Sox pitchers drinking on days when they aren't pitching as I was with the fact that they didn't seem to want to support teammates or keep up with a training regimen, but the Pierzynski comments would bother me a bit if I were a White Sox executive.

Then again, they did win the World Series in 2005, like the Red Sox did in 2004 and 2007. Maybe the Cubs need to get some beer down to the clubhouse.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: October 11, 2011 1:00 pm
Edited on: October 11, 2011 1:08 pm
 

White Sox considered Konerko for manager job

By Matt Snyder

Within the past few weeks, the White Sox let manager Ozzie Guillen go and then hired former third baseman Robin Ventura to be the new manager. We knew this. What we didn't know is who exactly general manager Kenny Williams considered for a manager before eventually deciding on Ventura. One name he considered is a shocker: First baseman Paul Konerko.

Yes, current first baseman Paul Konerko. Williams told reporters Tuesday he mulled it over and decided he'd rather Konerko just focus on playing -- also noting he never spoke to Konerko about the thought (Scott Merkin via Twitter).

White Sox coverage
The Ventura hire was very unpopular in the Chicago media, so I can't imagine the uproar this would have caused. There hasn't been a player-manager since Pete Rose did so for the Reds back from 1984-86.

Konerko, 35, is a five-time All-Star and a great baseball man. He's played in the majors since 1997 and has been with the White Sox since 1999. There's no question he eventually be an asset in the dugout for someone as a coach or manager, if he wants to take that path with his post-playing career. But there's a reason there hasn't been a player-manager for 25 years. Being a player and being a manager are two entirely different full-time jobs and giving one man both of those is just too much.

In fairness to Williams, "considering" someone and thinking seriously about hiring him are not synonymous. It's just amusing Konerko was even a consideration -- and quite the compliment to the veteran as well.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: October 11, 2011 9:48 am
 

Remembering Ventura's grand slam single

By Matt Snyder

Aside from Albert Pujols reminding everyone he's still Albert Pujols, the big story in baseball Monday night was Nelson Cruz's walk-off grand slam giving the Rangers a 2-0 lead in the ALCS. Cruz's blast was the first walk-off grand slam in MLB postseason history.

And, if you're like me, your reaction to hearing that news was: "No, that's not true ... oh, wait ... that is right."

Because in the 1999 NLCS, Mets third baseman Robin Ventura came to bat with the bases loaded in the bottom of the 15th inning in Shea Stadium with a tie game. And he hit a Kevin McGlinchy pitch over the right-center field wall to beat the Braves. It wouldn't be a technical grand slam, however, because Ventura's teammates mobbed him before he could reach second base. Thus, the official scorebook says it was a walk-off single. Ventura only got one RBI for it.

Here's the highlight, via MLB.com:



It's funny, two weeks ago Ventura hadn't been in the news in ages, other than for someone to mock him for being used as Nolan Ryan's punching bag once upon a time. All of a sudden, he's the White Sox manager and we get to reminisce about his grand slam that wasn't.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: October 6, 2011 4:51 pm
Edited on: October 6, 2011 7:44 pm
 

Robin Ventura named White Sox manager

Ventura

By Evan Brunell

The White Sox announced Thursday they have named Robin Ventura as their new manager.

"When I rejoined the White Sox this June, I said this was my baseball home and that part of me never left the White Sox organization," Ventura said in a team release announcing the hire.  

"My family and I are thrilled to be returning to Chicago.  Managing a Major League Baseball team is a tremendous honor.  It’s also an opportunity and a challenge.

"I am excited to begin my career as a manager surrounded by former teammates, staff, media and White Sox fans I know very well.  I already am looking forward to talking to our players, to this offseason and to getting things underway at spring training next February."

Ventura (pictured, left, with ex-manager Ozzie Guillen) becomes the club's 38th manager and beats out Rays bench coach Dave Martinez among other potential candidates. Martinez was considered a lock for the job, and Ventura's hiring comes as a big surprise; the only coaching experience he has had is as hitting coach for his children's high school baseball team in Arroyo Grande, Calif., he said in an interview with the Omaha World-Herald in June.

More White Sox coverage
"When I met with the media as our season ended, I identified one person at the very top of my managerial list," GM Kenny Williams said in a team release.  "I wanted someone who met very specific criteria centered around his leadership abilities. Robin Ventura was that man. His baseball knowledge and expertise, his professionalism, his familiarity with the White Sox and Chicago and his outstanding character make him absolutely the right person to lead our clubhouse and this organization into the seasons ahead."

Ventura is very familiar with the White Sox, having spent 10 years with the team starting in 1989. In a 16-year MLB career, he played under such luminaries as Jeff Torborg, Bobby Valentine and Joe Torre. "I ran the gamut on different styles and smart baseball men," he said, adding that he wants players who are willing to be accountable for their actions.

Ventura finished his career with a .267/.362/.444 line in 2,079 plate appearances with 294 home runs, retiring after the 2004 season. He's most famous for his on-field fight with Nolan Ryan that delivered an iconic picture of Ryan gripping Ventura in a headlock. Ryan is currently the CEO of the Texas Rangers, who will play in the ALCS on Friday. He had previously served as a broadcaster with ESPN, appearing at times on ESPNU and also serving as analyst during the College World Series. He has also been special adviser to the director of player development for the White Sox since June, working under former manager Buddy Bell who was considered a strong contender for the job before he declined to be considered. The former third baseman, who made two All-Star teams and won six Gold Gloves, was asked earlier this year in an ESPN chat how he felt about a coaching career.

"I'm happy right now, I have four kids at home," he wrote. "It's nice to be around for that. I do stuff with ESPN. Coaching is a big commitment, and some people just think you can be a guest celebrity coach, and that's not what it is. Lot of work. Happy doing what I'm doing."

Well, apparently Ventura's ready for the commitment of being the White Sox manager. He admitted to being surprised when approached about the position by Bell and Williams, but quickly warmed to the idea.

"I think there is a challenge there, getting back into the game," he said in a conference call.  "I do have a passion for it. I do have a passion for this team and this city. I'm not one to really back away from a lot of things. ...The passion is there to do it, I was asked to do it. I'm honored."

Williams, for his part, explained how they convinced Ventura it would be a good move.

"Needless to say he was a little surprised and little apprehensive," Williams said. "We had to explain to him exactly what the support system would be and exactly what our expectations were at the start. I was very clear with him that I do not expect him to be Tony La Russa on day one. In our estimation the fit is such that all of that will come together and we will ultimately be better off down the line that we could be if -- in my opinion -- we went in a different direction."

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeonBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com