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Tag:Nationals
Posted on: June 8, 2010 5:33 pm
Edited on: October 19, 2010 11:38 am
 

The extras for tonight's show

The Pirates have tabbed these nine meant to walk the plank versus Stephen Strasburg.

Andrew McCutchen cf
Neil Walker 2b
Lastings Milledge lf
Garrett Jones 1b
Delwyn Young rf
Andy LaRoche 3b
Ronny Cedeno ss
Jason Jaramillo c
Jeff Karstens rhp


Everyone will be watching how these batters do tonight, but nobody will be paying too much attention to them -- just what their results tell us about Strasburg.

In the end, one of these nine will tell their kids he was the first to be struck out by Strasburg, another may say he had the fist hit and yet another could be the first to hit a home run off the most hyped pitcher in a generation.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans





Posted on: June 8, 2010 4:32 pm
 

Strasburg mania


Bits and pieces from the Stras-os-phere ... er, Strasburbia ... er, nevermind. Bits and pieces about the Nationals' Stephen Strasburg:

  • A Strasburg baseball card sold on eBay last weekend for $16,403. Yes, really. Bowman has a series called “chrome superfractor,” and produces just one card for each player. Superfractor cards only pop up at a rate of one per 11,000 packs.
  • The Washington Post is running a Strasburg haiku contest .

  • His old college coach will be among the 25 friends and family in Strasburg's section. Which is notable, because his old college coach is Hall of Famer Tony Gwynn .
  • Jim Lackritz, associate dean of the college of business at San Diego State, where Strasburg played in college, estimates in this CNBC item that tonight's debut will net the Nationals $1.56 million. That's more than 10 percent of his record signing bonus, recovered in one night.
-- David Andriesen, CBSSports.com
Category: MLB
Posted on: June 8, 2010 4:22 pm
Edited on: October 19, 2010 11:24 am
 

Harper among Golden Spikes finalists

Last night's No. 1 pick, Bryce Harper, is up for another honor, although one much less lucritive: the Golden Spikes Award, givien to the nation's top collegiate player.

Harper is one of five finalists, and the only junior college player honored.

The other four players named as finalists by USA Baseball are Central Florida infielder/outfielder Chris Duffy, Miami catcher Yasmani Grandal, left-hander Drew Pomeranz of Ole Miss and Florida Gulf Coast lefty Chris Sale. Duffy is the only one not to be drafted in the first 13 picks.

Pomeranz went fifth overall to the Indians, Grandal 12th to Cincinnati and Sale 13th to White Sox.

Keeping with the siliness of the era, USA Baseball is opening up voting to fans at www.GoldenSpikesAward.com .

-- C. Trent Rosecrans


Posted on: June 8, 2010 12:39 pm
Edited on: June 8, 2010 12:42 pm
 

Solis, Allie lead Round 2

The Nationals have selected left-hander Sammy Solis of the University of San Diego with the first pick in the second round of the draft.

With the second pick, the Pirates took one of the most intriguing prospects, strong-armed right-hander Stetson Allie out of Ohio's St. Edward High School.

University of Texas right-hander Brandon Workman, who might have dropped due to reports he was looking for a big signing bonus, was finally taken at No. 57 by the Red Sox.

-- David Andriesen, CBSSports.com


Posted on: June 8, 2010 11:20 am
 

Four Boras clients in top seven picks

In case you're curious about the signability of your team's top pick, Sports Agent Blog has a list of representatives for the 50 players taken on the first day of the draft.

Scott Boras represents four of the top seven picks: Top pick Bryce Harper (C/OF, Nationals), No. 3 Manny Machado (SS, Orioles), No. 4 Christian Colon (SS, Royals) and No. 7 Matt Harvey (RHP, Mets). Boras is expected to seek a signing bonus for Harper in excess of the record $15.1 million he got top pick Stephen Strasburg minutes before last year's deadline.

-- David Andriesen, CBSSports.com

Category: MLB
Posted on: June 8, 2010 10:03 am
 

Happy Strasburg Day!


The day phenom David Clyde made his major league debut for the Rangers, Tom Vandergriff, the mayor of Arlington, said, "From now on, time here shall be marked from June 27, 1973."

Now that's pressure. Clyde, just 19 days out of high school, held his own in the most hyperbolically promoted debut in major league history, and went on to an undistinguished career. The Washington Nationals, like the 1973 Rangers a transplant franchise struggling to put fans in the seats, are hoping to get a more lasting impact from Stephen Strasburg, who, in case you hadn't heard, makes his major league debut tonight against the Pirates.

More than 200 media members are expected to be on hand at Nationals Park, which is lucky on most nights to get that many fans (exaggeration alert!). The Nationals are selling standing-room tickets, and even those are being sold at a premium online.

"He needs to take a step back, take a deep breath and kind of soak in the moment because you only debut once in your career. It's a special day for him, also," general manager Mike Rizzo told The Associated Press .

Strasburg is certainly ready. He went 7-2 with a 1.30 ERA and 65 strikeouts in 55 1/3 innings in Double-A and Triple-A. In fact, you might wonder what took the Nationals so long to call up the right-hander. Murray Chass got Washington president Stan Kasten to acknowledge that "one of the factors" in the timing was controlling Strasburg's service time.

By delaying a player's debut six weeks or so, a team keeps the player from being credited with a full year of major league service time in his first season. Down the line, it delays the player's eligibility for salary arbitration and free agency. The Nationals can now control Strasburg for seven seasons, rather than six, before risking losing him to free agency.

It's a common practice and doesn't violate labor laws. That doesn't mean the players' union is happy about it.

"We are paying attention to that and I would expect arbitration eligibility will be an issue in collective bargaining," union head Michael Weiner told Chass. "It has become so obvious."

The game, which starts at 7:05 EDT, will be shown on MLB Network with Bob Costas, Jim Kaat and John Smoltz in the booth.

-- David Andriesen, CBSSports.com

Category: MLB
Posted on: June 7, 2010 7:29 pm
Edited on: October 19, 2010 11:31 am
 

No guarantee with top pick

It was spring of 2007 and the Cincinnati Reds had three players in the clubhouse who had been taken with the first overall pick in the MLB Draft -- and at the time, they represented anything but a common path.

Ken Griffey Jr. was the ideal -- picked No. 1 out of Cincinnati Moeller High School, Griffey was in the big leagues less than two years later.

Also in that clubhouse was Paul Wilson, the top pick in 1994, who had a long, if not distinguished Major League career ravaged by an arm injury.

And then there was the 1999 1-1: Josh Hamilton. At the time, he was little more than a curiosity, the ultimate cautionary tale, promise derailed by a mixture of injuries and addiction.

Since then, Hamilton has bounced back to become an All-Star and Wilson and Griffey have retired.

As for top picks, in 2016, Griffey will become the first 1-1 since the draft was started in 1965 to be enshrined in Cooperstown, N.Y. Since Rick Monday was the first No. 1 pick in 1965, only 19 of those players taken have been All-Stars. Along with Griffey, it appears Chipper Jones (1990) and Alex Rodriguez (1993) will make it to the Hall of Fame, and Joe Mauer (2001) certainly looks to have that potential at this point.

Bryce Harper is the 46th first overall pick, and there's no guarantee he'll be what Washington Nationals fans expect.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

Posted on: June 7, 2010 9:31 am
 

Getting ready for draft day

Welcome to the CBSSports.com MLB Facts and Rumors blog. Go ahead and bookmark us now, because this is going to be an indispensable stop for any baseball fan.

Today is a light schedule on the scoreboard – nine games on the docket – but it's one of the biggest days on the baseball calendar. The First-Year Player Draft, the culmination of a year's work for hundreds of scouts and executives, gets under way tonight in Secaucus, N.J.

For the second year, the draft will be televised live, in its entirety, on MLB Network . The preview show starts at 6, with the first pick set for about 7:15 p.m. EDT.

Also for the second consecutive year, the Washington Nationals will be picking first. On the eve of the highly anticipated debut of last year's No. 1, right-hander Stephen Strasburg , the Nationals are expected to make Bryce Harper the top pick in 2010. Harper is a left-handed catcher/outfielder with phenomenal power – he batted .443 with 31 home runs and 98 RBI in 66 games this season for the College of Southern Nevada. And he's just 17. Here's some background on Harper and the buzz surrounding him from Tom Verducci of Sports Illustrated.

Here is the complete draft order, and SI.com and mymlbdraft.com have mock drafts up.

Even the best mock drafts usually bear little resemblance to what actually happens beyond the first few picks. And even after the picks are made, it's usually years before a draft can be assessed.

Sometimes you take Steve Chilcott No.1 when you could have had Reggie Jackson . Sometimes you get Albert Pujols in the 19th round. For all the work that goes into it, baseball's draft is ultimately an uncertain enterprise. Don't get too excited about the supposed sure thing your team drafts in the first round today, and have fun learning about their other picks and perhaps identifying a Mike Piazza (round 62 in 1988) in the rough.





Category: MLB
 
 
 
 
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