Tag:Jim Thome
Posted on: August 18, 2010 7:53 pm
 

Guillen goes off... again

Ozzie Guillen What's a day without an Ozzie Guillen rant?

Today's topic? Jim Thome, who hit a two-run walkoff homer on Tuesday against his old club.

The Chicago Tribune 's Mark Gonzalez has highlights of the reported 13-minute tirade.

Here's the basics:
"For all those people there saying it was my fault about Jim Thome, yes it's my fault," Guillen said. "If those people don't like that, [bleep] them."

Guillen reminded reporters that it was Thome who waived his no-trade clause on Aug. 31 to accept a trade to the Los Angeles Dodgers and that he's getting more playing time with the Twins recently only because slugger Justin Morneau has been sidelined since July 8 because of a concussion.

"I'm not afraid," Guillen said. "I can care less what people think. We're in second place. When Jim Thome was here, we finished third three times out of four years (actually two third-place finishes and one fourth-place ending). We went to one playoff because he hit a home run to go to the playoffs.

"Listen, I don't make that decision, we made that decision. It was hard for me to do this. A lot of people in Chicago talk about Jim Thome. How about J.D.? I think Jermaine Dye did more stuff for the Chicago White Sox than Jim Thome did, with all my respect to Jimbo.

"What's going on here? I don't get it. Why do people forget about J.D.? People don't even talk about J.D. at all. If Thome was a better player than J.D. for the White Sox, that's the answer. J.D.'s not playing for the Twins."
What's more, Guillen said the fact the game went to extra innings wasn't because his team fought back, nope, it's because Ron Gardenhire took out starter Scott Baker, who gave up four runs in 4 2/3 innings.
"That's Gardenhire's fault for bringing those guys [Jon Rauch, Matt Capps] into pitch," Guillen said. "He should have left that guy in that started the game and then we're still playing. I'm not running away from anybody. I don't run from anybody because I sleep very well last night, I played golf this morning. I didn't change anything. I rode my bike, go to sleep and as soon as I'm done with [this game] I'm going to go back to sleep. Same stuff." Same stuff, different day. But it's still mighty entertaining.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.
Posted on: August 18, 2010 5:13 pm
Edited on: August 18, 2010 5:26 pm
 

Jim Thome is aging nicely

Jim Thome
Jim Thome's walk-off homer against his old team Tuesday night was the 12th game-ending blast of his career, tying a major-league record. And he's in some pretty nice company, Hall of Fame members all: Jimmie Foxx, Mickey Mantle, Stan Musial, Frank Robinson and Babe Ruth.

But the Twins slugger isn't just collecting records by virtue of longevity. Less than two weeks shy of his 40th birthday, Thome is having a serious season. How serious? Check out the best OPS (on-base plus slugging) seasons ever for a player 39 or older:

1. Barry Bonds 1.422
2. Ted Williams 1.096
3. Bonds 1.045
4. Hank Aaron 1.045
5. Williams 1.042
6. Bonds .999
7. Thome .985
8. Babe Ruth .985
9. Stan Musial .924
10. Moises Alou .923

If you throw out the three seasons by Bonds, assuming that he had some artificial help in his later years, that leaves your top three as Ted, Hank and Thome. That's how good Thome has been this year. A heck of a signing by the Twins for $1.5 million.

-- David Andriesen

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

Category: MLB
Tags: Jim Thome, Twins
 
Posted on: August 1, 2010 10:28 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 12:28 pm
 

Trade market still open


Adam Dunn Everyone refers to the last day of July as the "trade deadline" even if it's not exactly accurate. It's officially the "non-waiver trade deadline" and that first part may not roll off the tongue, but it's important. It's the reason why one of the most speculated-about players at the deadline, Adam Dunn, told me July 31 "doesn't mean [anything]" to him.

Dunn should know, in the last year of a two-year deal, Dunn's movement will be speculated upon throughout the next month. He also knows from experience, two years ago the Reds traded him to Arizona after the non-waiver trade deadline.

Waivers are certainly a complication, but deals still get done until the end of the month, when a player has to be on the roster to be eligible for the postseason. So how does it work?

First, most teams put most -- if not all -- their players through the waiver process since you don't have to give up a player who is claimed, you can just pull him off waivers.

Unclaimed players can be traded to any team. Claimed players can be kept, traded or just handed over to the claiming team for nothing but salary relief. That's what happened last year when the Blue Jays put him on waivers, the White Sox claimed him and Toronto was happy to shed his remaining five years for $59.7 million on his contract. So, if some team wanted to claim Carlos Zambrano or Kosuke Fukudome or Alfonso Soriano, the Cubs would likely dance for joy. But that's unlikely to happen (even though I would have said the same thing a year ago about Rios).

Now, if just one team claims a player, he can be dealt only to that team. If more than one team claims a player, he can be traded to the team with the worst record in his league that claims him. If no team in the same league claims the player, but more than one team in the other league claims him, he can be traded to the team with the worst record.

So now with the process out of the way, it's good to keep in mind that this isn't an unusual process. Last season Scott Kazmir, Jim Thome, Carl Pavano, Alex Gonzalez, Brad Penny, Aubrey Huff, Billy Wagner, Jon Garland and Ivan Rodriguez. So who could that be this year?

Obviously, Dunn is still out there. He realizes the real trade deadline is at the end of this month, not the beginning. If the Nationals can't agree to an extension, the Nationals need to get something for Dunn. Based on many of the rumors that were out there, it was hardly surprising he wasn't dealt. Nationals GM Mike Rizzo was asking for the moon and nobody was willing to spend the money to get there. White Sox GM Kenny Williams hasn't exactly hidden his desire for Dunn, and a little thing like waivers won't stop him. However, he'll have to hope nearly the rest of the teams pass on the big man, and that's not likely.

The biggest name that could move would be Manny Ramirez. The Dodgers don't know what they're going to get out of him and could shed roughly $7 million. As CBSSports.com senior writer Scott Miller notes , Ramirez has a full no-trade clause, but would likely waive that to go to the American League and DH. If the White Sox can't get Dunn, Ramirez may be a solid backup option -- albeit a bit expensive.

Andy LaRoche Diamondbacks first baseman Adam LaRoche has a mutual option for 2011 that increases to $9.5 million if he's traded, though the buyout remains at $1.5 million. Kelly Johnson may not get through waivers, but could still be traded. He's arbitration eligible after the season.

The Royals would certainly love for another team to take Jose Guillen and what's left of the $12 million salary for this season. Guillen is a free agent after the season.

Mike Lowell is still -- sorta -- with the Red Sox, but would likely sail through waivers because he's owed the remainder of his $12 million salary this season and nobody's quite sure what they'll get out of him.

The reliever market didn't see much action on Saturday, but Toronto's Kevin Gregg, Seattle's David Aardsma and Colorado's Joe Beimel could be moved before the end of this month.

As for starters, Colorado's Aaron Cook is signed for $9.25 million next season with a mutual option of $11 million in 2012 and a $0.5 million buyout. His annual salary increases by $1 million for each season.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

Posted on: July 3, 2010 6:37 pm
Edited on: July 3, 2010 7:41 pm
 

Thome cracks top 10 on homer list


Jim Thome Entering the top 10 in career home runs seems like it should be a bigger deal than it was on Saturday.

Sure, there was a standing ovation, a curtain call and the rest as Jim Thome tied Harmon Killebrew for 10th place with a second-inning home run off of Tampa's Wade Davis and then passed him in his next at-bat, in the fourth inning with his 574th career home run.

It's an amazing feat, 574 home runs is an amazing number when put in its historical perspective -- but in recent history, it seems like just another record going down.

It was just nine years ago when Mark McGwire passed Killebrew for the fifth spot. Since then five others -- Barry Bonds, Sammy Sosa, Ken Griffey Jr., Alex Rodriguez and now Thome have jumped over Killebrew, and Manny Ramirez needs just 20 more to do the same.

I know records are meant to be broken and all that crap, but don't they lose something when they're broken over and over -- and when Sammy Sosa is involved?

Jimmie Foxx is now 17th on the all-time home run list, and somehow that seems wrong. Eddie Matthews isn't in the top 20.

And it's a shame that Thome, who by all accounts did things the right way and is a decent person, has his accomplishment overshadowed by making it such a common occurrence. Thome stands next to Killebrew, both bigger-than-life physical figures, yet gentle Giants.

it seems a combination of steroids, new ballparks, expansion, the designated hitter and emphasis on homers has devalued the career totals. Oh, and Sammy Sosa.

Congrats to Thome, though. It's too bad it's not a bigger deal than it is.

All-time home run leaders
1. Barry Bonds 762
2. Hank Aaron 755
3. Babe Ruth 714
4. Willie Mays 660
5. Ken Griffey Jr. 630
6. Sammy Sosa 609
7. Alex Rodriguez 595
8. Frank Robinson 586
9. Mark McGwire 583
10. Jim Thome 574

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.



Category: MLB
Tags: Jim Thome, Twins
 
Posted on: June 10, 2010 9:40 am
 

Baseball's nice guys

Sports Illustrated surveyed 347 major league players recently, asking them, "Who is the nicest player in the game?"

The winner was Mariners DH Mike Sweeney, with 20 percent of the votes. Sort of ironic that this comes during a season in which the only news Sweeney has made was when he offered to fight any teammates who told a reporter that Ken Griffey Jr. was napping in the clubhouse during a game.

The rest of the Top 5 nice guys: Jim Thome (17 percent), Johnny Damon (5 percent), Derek Jeter (5 percent) and Raul Ibanez (5 percent).

Apparently people get nicer as they age. The average age of the top five is 36.8.

-- David Andriesen

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

 
 
 
 
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