Tag:Oakland Raiders
Posted on: October 23, 2011 10:50 am
 

Campbell found out about Palmer trade on TV

Posted by Will Brinson

When Carson Palmer was traded from the Bengals to the Raiders, we made the argument that the biggest loser in the whole deal was Oakland incumbent Jason Campbell. After all, Hue Jackson's decision to make a play for Palmer essentially sealed Campbell's future by the bay.

Cementing that theory, then, is the news that Campbell found out about the Palmer trade while watching television. In his hospital bed. With his fiancée.

"I was halfway still on pain medicine," Campbell told Bay Area radio station 95.7 The Game. "It was kind of a moment of silence. My fiancée looked at me to see if I was gonna say something. There's different things that go through your mind but you don't want to fill your mind with those thoughts."

Can you imagine how awkward that is? I mean, Campbell's a professional athlete and he's been through a couple Redskins regimes, so the guy knows a thing or two about getting punched in the stomach by a front office.

But the anesthesia on his broken collarbone hadn't even worn off before the Raiders had hauled him out behind the house and thrown his Oakland career in the (metaphorical) dumpster ... without giving him a heads up. And letting him find out in front of his lady.

"I started receiving these text messages and everything about, you know, 'Hey what's going on?' and 'There's been a trade' and everything, and 'They've just given up a first round,' " Campbell said.

Look, the NFL is a cold business. This stuff happens a lot and the Raiders aren't supposed to be sending flowers -- they're supposed to be doing everything in their power to improve their team.

It's just that Campbell, more than most players, has been on the icy receiving end of things over his career and you'd think they could at least give him a heads up that they were calling the dogs off on his career in Oakland.

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Posted on: October 22, 2011 8:14 pm
Edited on: October 22, 2011 9:29 pm
 

Hue: Palmer throwing 'like you wouldn't believe'

Posted by Will Brinson



Ever since Oakland sent (potentially) two first-round picks to Cincinnati in order to acquire Carson Palmer, there's been a fierce debate about whether or not they paid too much.

One of the reasons for concern is that many a pundit believes Palmer lost some the zing off his throw. An elbow surgery injury in 2008 coincides with the last time he averaged more than seven yards per attempt as well an obvious decline in production; his numbers in 2009 and 2010 aren't close to his 2005 and 2006 numbers, when he was arguably one of the best quarterbacks in the NFL.

But Hue Jackson, the man who green-lit the deal to acquire Palmer, isn't trying to hear any of that business. In fact, he says Palmer's slinging the rock around like it was the good old days.


The Kansas City Chiefs will battle the Oakland Raiders this Sunday at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum. Which team has the advantage? NFL.com's Pat Kirwan joins Jason Horowitz to preview this AFC West matchup. Watch the game at 4:05 PM ET on CBS.

"You’ve got to be kidding me," Jackson said about the speculation that Palmer lost strength and velocity. "He’s throwing the ball like you wouldn’t believe. Trust me, if he’s out there -- I mean, we wouldn’t have signed him if he couldn’t throw.

"I get surprised at those kinds of questions because I would never put the guy on the team or [trade] draft picks like that if he couldn’t throw the ball or he could not do or be what I think he has the potential to be."

Palmer to the Raiders


Of course, everyone else is surprised because it seemed obvious that Palmer's skills declined after his elbow injury. And because Jackson gave up big-time draft picks in order to land him.

It might not matter; Palmer's an upgrade over Kyle Boller if he goes under the knife tomorrow. And as bad as everyone feels for Jason Campbell, Palmer's an upgrade over him too, even though he missed the first six weeks of the season.

But none of that is important -- Palmer can throw for 4,000 yards, or he can throw for 400, but if the Raiders don't make the playoffs this year or next, after giving up the pair of picks they did, then they lost the deal.

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Posted on: October 21, 2011 4:30 pm
Edited on: October 21, 2011 5:03 pm
 

Report: Carson Palmer may not start for Raiders

The Raiders could feature some combination of Palmer, Boller and Pryor Sunday against the Chiefs(AP)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

CBSSports.com's Clark Judge was in the minority a day ago, when he didn't believe that Carson Palmer would start immediately for the Raiders after almost a year on the couch and just a week of practice. "It just seems as if starting a quarterback who hasn't played in over nine months, has no history with your team or his teammates and isn't in football shape isn't such a smart idea," he wrote.

A day later, Judge looks pretty smart because as it turns out, Palmer might not be under center when Raiders host the Chiefs Sunday.

Palmer to the Raiders

"I'm 95 percent sure he is not going to play," a source close to the situation told ESPN's Adam Schefter Friday afternoon. "Practicing Wednesday and Thursday, he felt he's not ready to make those high-velocity throws yet. Maybe they could decide something at the last minute, but I don't think he's going to play."

According to the NFL Network's Steve Wyche, Kyle Boller will start instead of Palmer.

It was those "high-velocity throws" that most troubled Palmer's skeptics. The former first-overall pick had lost considerable arm strength since suffering an elbow injury during the 2008 season but as recently as Thursday, one Raiders beat reporter said that Palmer's "sideline throws arrive in a hurry, and with plenty of zip."

But as we mentioned at the time, any questions about arm strength will linger until Palmer has to make a stick throw under pressure during a game.

Raiders head coach Hue Jackson hinted during a Friday radio appearance that the game plan could feature multiple quarterbacks. And according to the Oakland Tribune's Jerry McDonald, Kyle Boller, who replaced Jason Campbell last week, took first-team snaps to open Friday's practice.

McDonald added that "Jackson indicated he could reach a decision on whether Boller or Carson Palmer would start against the Chiefs on Friday, but that’s unlikely to happen in an open forum. He said he’d probably make the call while having his weekly 'Irish coffee' Friday evening. Chances are, that means the only people who find out are the CBS TV production crew on Saturday."

Perhaps giving more credence to the notion that more than one quarterback will play Sunday: rookie Terrelle Pryor has also taken first-team reps this week.


The Kansas City Chiefs will battle the Oakland Raiders this Sunday at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum. Which team has the advantage? NFL.com's Pat Kirwan joins Jason Horowitz to preview this AFC West matchup. Watch the game at 4:05 PM ET on CBS. Also: don't forget to check out the Pregame: Chiefs-Raiders edition.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're at it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: October 21, 2011 10:43 am
 

Pick-6 Podcast: Previewing the NFL, Week 7

Posted by Will Brinson & Ryan Wilson

We never imaged there'd be a storyline that would overtake Tim Tebow's first start of the season, but the Raiders traded for Carson Palmer this week, going all-in on the 2011 season.

So we lead with Palmer and his new team facing the Chiefs, then talk about Tebow facing the Dolphins in Miami where he will be honored at halftime (seriously), before turning our attention to other first-time starters this season: John Beck replaces Rex Grossman in Washington, and rookie Christian Ponder takes over for Donovan McNabb in Minnesota.

We also preview the rest of the Week 7 action before having weekly guest Paul Bessire of PredictionMachine.com stop by to offer up some expert advice on -- you guessed it -- accurately predicting this week's winners. 

Talking starts ... now.

Just hit the play button below to listen (and did we mention that you should subscribe to the podcast via iTunes?). If you can't listen to the podcast below, download it here. And if you'd like to keep working while listening in your browser, pop that puppy out in a new tab here.


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Posted on: October 21, 2011 10:01 am
Edited on: October 21, 2011 10:03 am
 

Report: Carson Palmer took pay cut with Raiders

It may not look like it above, but everybody's happy ... for now. (AP/US PRESSWIRE)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

Plenty of people (us included) thought that two first-round picks* was a steep price to pay for a quarterback who has been on his couch for eight months, and was last considered elite in 2005.

But Carson Palmer is now an Oakland Raider, and despite just a week of practice, he appears set to start against the Chiefs Sunday. And, yes, two first-rounders for a 31-year-old QB whose best days seemed behind him reeks of desperation, but Palmer's completely healthy, and he even took a pay cut to play for Oakland. Not so much because he's a swell guy and was willing to do anything to get out of Cincinnati (though that may have had something to do with it), but because Palmer's deal, as currently written, wasn't going to fit under the Raiders' salary cap.

Under his old contract (the one that would pay him $118 million and so incensed Bengals fans when Palmer "retired"), Palmer was set to earn $11.5 million. He instead restructured his contract and took a $5 million pay cut this season, an NFLPA source told ESPN's Adam Schefter Thursday.


The Kansas City Chiefs will battle the Oakland Raiders this Sunday at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum. Which team has the advantage? NFL.com's Pat Kirwan joins Jason Horowitz to preview this AFC West matchup. Watch the game at 4:05 PM ET on CBS. Also: don't forget to check out the Pregame: Chiefs-Raiders edition.

More details via Schefter's report: "They did guarantee $5 million of his $12.5 million salary next season, but nobody thought the Raiders would have parted ways with him when they surrendered two draft picks to the Bengals. Palmer is scheduled to make $12.5 million next season, $13 million in 2013 and $15 million in 2014. But Palmer will make $5 million less this season."

* Technically, the Raiders got Palmer for a 2012 first-round pick and a 2013 second-rounder that would become a first-rounder if Oakland makes the AFC title game this postseason.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're at it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: October 20, 2011 5:59 pm
 

Carson Palmer 'has plenty of zip on his throws'

Carson Palmer and Kyle Boller at Raiders practice Wednesday. (US PRESSWIRE)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

If we're to believe Raiders offensive coordinator Al Saunders, Carson Palmer, less than a week out of retirement, will start Sunday against the Chiefs "as long as he's breathing."

CBSSports.com's Clark Judge isn't buying it, primarily because "It just seems as if starting a quarterback who hasn't played in over nine months, has no history with your team or his teammates and isn't in football shape isn't such a smart idea."

Palmer to the Raiders
We'll know one way or the other Sunday afternoon, but for now the discussion remains if a) the Palmer we'll see will be a better rested version of the 2010 quarterback who appeared skittish, or b) a reinvented Palmer more closely resembling his 2005 self, when he was one of the league's best QBs.

CBSSports.com's Pete Prisco thinks it'll be the latter.

NFL Network's Albert Breer talked to former NFL quarterback Ken O'Brien, who's been working with Palmer during his retirement/holdout, and let's just say O'Brien was impressed with what he saw.

"He's healthy as a horse," O'Brien told Breer. "I just helped him get through drills. And from where he was, he had to get healthy after the end of the season. That's the good part of the layoff. He rested his body up. … Everyone wants to be in top shape, but when you have an injury inside of you, with ligaments or cartilage, that takes time to heal, no matter how strong or muscular you feel."

After the issues about being in shape and learning a new offense, there were also concerns about Palmer's arm strength. He came into the league with a cannon, and after 2008 elbow surgery, he left looking more like Chad Pennington (slight exaggeration, but everybody can agree that he had lost a few MPH's off his fastball).

"If everything else is equal, he has all the talent in the world to do whatever he wants to," O'Brien said. "Talent and desire is not an issue. It might've been a dysfunctional situation he was in, or being injured, where he didn't have as much success of late. And being healthy certainly helps. He can do everything he wants to do physically now, and that's exciting.

"Add to that, he and Hue have history together. Hue knows what to do, he's an exceptionally smart coach. Carson will fit right in, where they were looking for an answer. You can't just get guys like him."


The Kansas City Chiefs will battle the Oakland Raiders this Sunday at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum. Which team has the advantage? NFL.com's Pat Kirwan joins Jason Horowitz to preview this AFC West matchup. Watch the game at 4:05 PM ET on CBS.

Not without giving up two first-round picks, anyway. With just a handful of practices with his new team, Palmer has looked every bit the franchise quarterback. Any questions about his arm strength will linger until he has to make a stick throw under pressure during a game, but for now, the reassuring tweets of Raiders beat reporter Steve Corkran will have to do (from Thursday's practice): "Palmer sideline throws arrive in a hurry, plenty of zip on his throws."

If you still have doubts, here's Saunders, upon first viewing Palmer on the Raiders' practice field Wednesday. “He walked out on the field yesterday and everybody kind of looked at everybody and said, ‘You know what? This is a real quarterback,’” he said. “That was the comment made by a couple people as they watched him throw. It just depends on how quickly he feels comfortable in what we’re doing and that shouldn’t take too long.”

Hardly a ringing endorsement for Kyle Boller (which he must be used to at this stage of his career), but that's sort of the point. You don't mortgage the franchise for a slight upgrade from your backup. That said, just how good Palmer will be -- and if he's worth what the Raiders gave up to get him -- remains to be seen.

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Posted on: October 19, 2011 4:29 pm
 

Podcast: Week 7 Film Room breakdown

Posted by Will Brinson & Ryan Wilson

Week 7's on the horizon, which means it's time to hit the film room with Andy Benoit.

This week, we break down Jets/Chargers (you can read the Film Room post here) and Raiders/Chiefs (you can read that Film Room post here).

Plus, Andy and Will talk about the recent Carson Palmer trade, whether the Redskins should start John Beck or Rex Grossman, if the Vikings are smart rolling with Christian Ponder, how Tim Tebow will do in his 2011 starting debut in a "road game" against the Dolphins plus much, much more.

Just hit the play button below to listen (and did we mention that you should subscribe to the podcast via iTunes?). If you can't listen to the podcast below, download it here. And if you'd like to keep working while listening in your browser, pop that puppy out in a new tab here.


For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're at it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: October 19, 2011 3:05 pm
 

Film Room: Raiders vs. Chiefs preview

Posted by Eye on Football Analyst Andy Benoit



Imagine you get sick. You call your girlfriend to tell her that you’re sorry but you’re not going to be able to go with her to the ski resort this weekend. She says that’s no problem, she’ll just go with one of her friends. But when she scrolls through her contacts, she realizes she doesn’t have any friends nearby who are good skiers.

So, she calls to tell you to get well soon and also that she’s going to the ski resort with that guy her cousin knows from the gym. Oh, and the guy and her are moving in together after the trip but can the two of you still be friends? You can’t help but realize that if you’d never gotten sick, your girlfriend would not have started thinking about someone else.

If you can imagine this, then you can imagine how Jason Campbell is probably feeling right now. Let’s examine Jason Campbell’s Carson Palmer’s 4-2 Raiders as they head into their matchup against a Chiefs club that has won two straight coming off its bye but has been rocked by injuries and turmoil.


[Raiders vs. Chiefs PreGame]

1. The Decision
Forty-three million over four years, along with a first-and either first-or-second-round pick in exchange for a quarterback who became inconsistent after a slew of injuries and failed to manage the oversized personalities infiltrating his locker room and huddle in Cincinnati? That’s a steep price – probably too steep, in fact.

But you can understand the Raiders’ logic in going for a potential franchise quarterback. Like the skiing girlfriend, they’re attracted to strong-armed prototypes and are looking for a ring.

The Raiders knew they couldn’t get that ring with Campbell. Caretaking quarterbacks don’t cut it in today’s NFL. Campbell has always been too methodical in his reads and mechanics. He locks onto receivers, which limits what Hue Jackson can do with his gameplans. Campbell is athletic but seems to forget it whenever defenders flash in his face. In short, he has always been exactly what he’ll be when his collarbone heels: a quality backup.
That said, when a team goes all-in like the Raiders have here, they’d better be set in virtually all areas around the quarterback.

So how set are the rest of the Raiders?

2. Pass offense
It’s difficult to gauge Oakland’s passing attack because it has been tailored to hide Campbell’s limitations. But a safe assumption is that with Palmer aboard (whenever he does play), it will become downfield oriented. Darrius Heyward-Bey, Jacoby Ford and Denarius Moore might be the fastest receiving trio in the league. Also, tight end Kevin Boss is not fast, but he’s effective stretching the seams.

Still, speed isn’t everything. The Raiders wideouts all remain raw. Heyward-Bey’s elevated reception total has been partly a function of facing favorable off-coverage. His hands are improved but still not naturally soft. As for Ford, durability and route running can be hit or miss. And Moore? He has done next to nothing since his breakout game at Buffalo.

Still, we’ve seen that (when healthy) these guys can give the Raiders firepower. And because Darren McFadden and fullback Marcel Reese are such dynamic weapons out of the backfield, Hue Jackson can comfortably sacrifice an extra receiver in the formation in order to employ a sixth offensive lineman.

Doing this makes for a better play-action game (a run-oriented team throwing out of a run formation) and also ameliorates right tackle Khalif Barnes’ weakness in pass protection.

3. Run offense
McFadden has blossomed into a legitimate top-five running back. The difference between now and two years ago is he’s staying healthy and has figured out how to get to the perimeter early in the run. That’s important because being such a stiff-hipped, straight-line runner, McFadden doesn’t have the type of agility and lateral burst needed to elude defenders at the line of scrimmage or second level. But he has uncanny speed and acceleration, which, when turned on full blast, make him hard to tackle cleanly.

The Raiders blockers have helped ignite Oakland’s explosive outside run game. Rookie guard Stefan Wisniewski has good movement skills (particularly in short areas) and center Samson Satele has been getting out in front with much greater consistency.

The Raiders also spend a lot of time in six-offensive linemen sets, with the nimble Khalif Barnes serving essentially as a 325-pound blocking tight end. Factor in Michael Bush’s between-the-tackles power and you have the making of a potent, sustainable rushing attack.

4. Defense
When the Raiders don’t surrender big plays they’re tough to trade blows with for four quarters. The defensive line is enormous and athletic, particularly inside where Richard Seymour (future Hall of Famer?) and Tommy Kelly present thundering power augmented by uncommon initial quickness.
The key to creating big plays against Oakland is isolating their linebackers.

Middle linebacker Rolando McClain plays slow (both mentally and physically) and can be exploited. Aaron Curry has only been in town one week, but if his track record from Seattle means anything, he too can be exploited, mainly in space outside the numbers or when forced to cover receivers horizontally. It’s surprising that Curry was handed Quinton Groves' job right away (Groves had been up and down but was getting more comfortable).

The secondary does indeed miss Nnamdi Asomugha, but any secondary would miss Nnamdi Asomugha. Stanford Routt has been adequate on the left side, and the versatile Michael Huff is having the best season of his career. Anytime a team plays predominant man coverage (like the Raiders do), the defensive backs are vulnerable. A pass-rush can help relieve this. The Raiders have great interior rushers but could stand to use a little more speed on the edges.

5. Kansas City’s chances
The question is whether the Chiefs can find some sort of run game without Jamaal Charles. So far, the answer has been no. Don’t expect that to change Sunday; Oakland’s defensive tackles should feast on Kansas City’s struggling interior line.

In the air, teams have been attacking the Raiders defense with play action and rollouts. Matt Cassel has the mobility and arm to make throws on the move (he did so frequently against the Vikings) but that’s usually by circumstance, not design. This is a shotgun passing offense, with success hinging on whether Dwayne Bowe and Steve Breaston can separate from Stanford Routt and DeMarcus Van Dyke (or Chris Johnson or Chimdi Chekwa, should either return from their hamstring injuries).

On the other side of the ball, Tamba Hali is one of the most disruptive players in all the land. He plays with perfect leverage and physically strong quickness in all cardinal directions. The Raiders don’t have anyone who can block him. Hali can’t do it alone, though, which is why Justin Houston needs to play with more decisiveness (tough to ask of a rookie sometimes). Kansas City’s secondary misses Eric Berry but has two physical corners (Brandon Carr and Brandon Flowers) who can compensate, especially against raw wideouts.

Key matchup to watch: Darren McFadden against Derrick Johnson. Speed on speed.

So who will win? Check our NFL expert picks for all Week 7 games

Follow @Andy_Benoit on Twitter or contact him at Andy.Benoit-at-NFLTouchdown.com.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com