Tag:Free Agents
Posted on: July 15, 2011 1:40 pm
Edited on: July 15, 2011 6:10 pm
 

Report: Rookies will get '40-50%' less in 2011

Posted by Will Brinson

At the beginning of the lockout (in the long, long ago), the rookie-wage scale wasn't something too many people worried about. After all, lowering the amount of guaranteed money given to risky rookies was a sensible move for both sides.

The wage scale, however, popped up as an issue in later stages of negotiations. Fortunately, both sides found common ground and, as our own Mike Freeman reported on Thursday, worked out the "basic parameters of a rookie-wage scale proposal."

Those basic parameters, according to ESPN, involve four-year deals for rookies with team options for a fifth year.

There would be an approximate decrease in money to rookies by "40-50" percent, with that money directed to veterans and retired players. But Adam Schefter's report indicates that during the fifth, optioned year the player would receive "a salary equal to the average of the top 10 player salaries" at that player's respective position.

Yes, this is similar to the calculations for the franchise tag and, yes, it gives clubs a reason to re-negotiate with third- and fourth-year players ahead of time if they're performing at an elite level.

Latest on Labor

Picks 11-32 under the reported system would receive a fifth-year salary equal to the average of the No. 3-25 salaries at their respective positions. And, finally, Schefter reports that the money involved would be guaranteed if the fifth-year option was "exercised after the third year" of the deal.

You can argue up-and-down about who won (and who lost; though it's pretty obvious that the rookies did and it's pretty obvious why no one was telling them anything) this area of negotiating, but the truth is that it presents a fair way in which to reward players whose talent shines early in their career without penalizing teams too drastically for a failure to evaluate talent at the top of the draft.

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Posted on: July 15, 2011 9:54 am
Edited on: July 16, 2011 9:17 am
 

Free-agent right of first refusal not an issue

Posted by Will Brinson

As Mike Freeman reported yesterday, the end of the lockout/close of a new CBA is close. Like the "half-yard line" close, thanks to everyone moving past the obstacle that was the rookie-wage scale.

But it still appears, based on various reports from around the web, that there's another issue hanging around in the negotiations: right of first refusal on the big old crop of free agents that will theoretically emerge under the new collective bargaining agreement.

We've covered this particular issue before, and it's an interesting request from the owners. Essentially they want to get a shot at signing the guys who went from restricted to unrestricted status because of the change in the CBA terms.

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We've also been repeatedly told that it ain't happening. (And heard that the owners aren't actually pushing too much on this issue.) It now appears that it's off the table entirely; owners have reportedly decided they won't pursue first-right-of-refusal clauses.

There's good reason for that. By most accounts, the players sacrificed a big chunk of change, in terms of revenue sharing to push this deal along.

The owners have also made sacrifices, and one of those is allowing a group of 500-plus players to "graduate" into free agency earlier than they would have under the the expired CBA rules.

Plus, the owners are the one who put themselves in the position of having this group of players out on the market by opting out of the CBA a few years back. Thus, any leeway from the players on this issue would indeed be a surprise.

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Posted on: June 29, 2010 4:25 pm
 

Some Familiar Names Remain Unsigned


There are some big names still on the market. Most of you know about Terrell Owens. But here’s a rundown of other longtime starters who remain unsigned, with a quick explanation for why.

Arizona OT Mike Gandy: Major liability in pass protection.

Baltimore WR Kelley Washington: Solid No. 4 receiver and special teams contributor. The guess here is he’s demanding too much money.

Carolina G Keydrick Vincent: Hard to explain this one. He was near Pro Bowl caliber as a run-blocker last season.

Chicago DE Adewale Ogunleye: Was slowing down before serious leg injury late last season.

Dallas LT Flozell Adams: At 35, too lumbering to survive on an island in pass protection. (Though it's worth noting that, with the injury to Willie Colon, Adams is reportedly visiting with the Steelers.)

Houston G Chester Pitts: Coming off serious knee injury.

Kansas City S Mike Brown: Struggled making tackles in open space last season.

St. Louis TE Randy McMichael: Attitude is iffy, but not nearly as iffy as his blocking.

San Francisco CB Dre’ Bly: Insiders don’t respect his toughness. Cocky demeanor no longer serves him well.

Seattle CB Ken Lucas: Confidence seems shot after miserable ’09 campaign.

Tennessee LB Keith Bulluck: Teams are just waiting out his ACL recovery. He’ll sign somewhere.


--Andy Benoit

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