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Tag:Joel Dreessen
Posted on: February 25, 2012 2:51 pm
 

2012 NFL Free Agency: Tight End Rankings

Shiancoe leads what is a fairly unimpressive group of free agent tight ends. (US Presswire)
By Josh Katzowitz

Leading up to the start of free agency on March 13, we're compiling the best 2012 NFL free agents by position. These are the tight ends.

Originally for this post, I listed Jermichael Finley for the No. 1 spot on this list. Obviously, he was an easy call, because he was so obviously the best tight end on the market. Now, though, he’s a signed a two-year deal with the Packers worth about $7.5 million per season, and therefore, the free agent tight end class of 2012 suddenly has grown awfully weak (let’s face it, it wasn’t all that great with Finley on top either).

The best tight ends in the game -- guys like New England’s Rob Gronkowski, New Orleans’ Jimmy Graham, San Francisco’s Vernon Davis and Finley -- are safely secure with their respective teams, and those teams who actually are looking for tight ends will have to draw on a list with very few, if any, top-line playmakers. Considering Gronkowski and Graham are helping to redefine the position, that’s not great news. Nevertheless, here we go.

1. Visanthe Shiancoe

Breakdown: Since catching 56 passes for 566 yards and 11 touchdowns when Brett Favre was throwing to him, Shiancoe’s production has decreased the past two seasons, especially in 2011 when he caught 36 passes for 409 yards and three touchdowns. Since he made $4.5 million last season, it doesn’t seem likely the Vikings will re-sign him. Especially since the Vikings seem high on Kyle Rudolph. But unless Favre is planning to return for another season (and let’s face it, we can never rule out this option), the value of Shiancoe isn’t as high as it once was.

Potential Landing Spots: Giants, Browns

2. Martellus Bennett


Breakdown: Though Bennett doesn’t have impressive receiving numbers, that’s not what he’s called upon to do. Instead, he’ll be one of the more valuable tight ends in free agency because he’s top-notch run blocker. Bennett oftentimes is overshadowed by his teammate Jason Witten, but his worth to the Cowboys is evident every time Bennett steps on the field (it also seems evident, though, that Bennett’s time in Dallas is finished). But in order to get paid tons of money, he needs to show he can catch the ball, and that’s something missing from his arsenal at this point.

Potential Landing Spots: Bears, Broncos, Jets, Bengals

3. Joel Dreessen


Breakdown: Dreessen is a solid tight end, and he’s been an important cog for the Texans as quarterback Matt Schaub, receiver Andre Johnson and running back Arian Foster have turned Houston into a consistent top-10 offense in the past three years. He’s not a big-time pass catcher, but he’s a solid run-blocker (as Foster, Ben Tate and Derrick Ward likely would attest). The Texans would like to keep their two tight end set, but assuming Owen Daniels can stay healthy, Dreessen becomes a little more expendable in Houston.
Fred Davis
Potential Landing Spots: Chiefs, Jets, Giants, Texans, Redskins

4. Fred Davis

Breakdown: He’s actually a pretty good candidate to be franchise-tagged by the Redskins (safety LaRon Landry (and his muscles!) is another candidate), and considering he caught 59 passes for 796 yards in 12 games last year in the best season of his career, Davis is a potential emerging star. Unfortunately for Davis, he was suspended for the final four games of the season for a failed drug test, and if he happens to fail another one, he’d be suspended for a year. So, there’s a little bit of a gray cloud following him around, and teams that need a tight end might shy away from a potential off-the-field problem like that.

Potential Landing Spots: Redskins

5. Jeremy Shockey


Breakdown: It was only four years ago when Shockey was considered an elite tight end, good for about 60 catches, 600 yards and six touchdowns per season from 2004-07. He’s been hurt (literally) by injuries, and after the Saints released him in 2010, he was solid enough  last season in Charlotte (though the team did like the toughness he brought to the squad). Shockey has talked about wanting to play in Miami -- he’s also talked apparently about retiring, though it seems like everybody is denying it at that point -- but with Anthony Fasano already entrenched as the Dolphins tight end, Shockey probably would have to be content to play as the No. 2 tight end. He made $4 million last season, and in order to return to the Panthers to play with tight end Greg Olsen, he’d probably have to take a paycut.

Potential Landing Spots: Dolphins, Giants, Panthers
Shockey

6. John Carlson


Breakdown: Carlson missed the entire season with a torn labrum in his shoulder, so there will be plenty of caution surrounding him, even though he’s caught at least 50 passes in two of his first three seasons in the league. Making matters worse, Carlson said in January that he’s not completely healed, estimating that he was only at 90 percent. “Obviously missing the season is not ideal,” he told the Tacoma News Tribune. “But that was the situation I was in. I feel really good. I didn’t beat my body up over the course of the season and my shoulder is repaired.” Carlson is also a solid run-blocker, and he seems like one of those guys who could move into the top-10 of tight ends around the league.

Potential Landing Spots:Seahawks, Rams

7. Jacob Tamme


Breakdown: Like most everybody inside the Indianapolis franchise, Tamme suffered without Peyton Manning around. Playing in place of the injured Dallas Clark, Tamme caught 67 passes for 631 yards and four touchdowns in 2010. Last year, those numbers dropped to 19 for 177 and one. Which obviously is not the kind of season you want to have in a contract year, but it reflects Tamme’s position on the team and, probably, in the league. He’s a solid backup, the No. 2 tight end in a two-tight end set. He has talent, but it’s unclear how much of that was reflected off Manning. He could be a low-risk, somewhat-high reward guy for the right team.

Potential Landing Spots: Colts, Dolphins, Broncos, Bengals

8. Honorable Mention


Unrestricted free agents: Scott Chandler, Reggie Kelly, Daniel Fells
Restricted free agents: None

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Posted on: November 22, 2010 6:24 pm
 

Hot Routes 11.22.10: Week 11 boxscore tidbits

Hot Routes

Posted by Andy Benoit

Did you notice the Giants only had 208 yards of total offense against the Eagles Sunday night?

Justin Tuck had three sacks and was phenomenal in containment outside and against the run.

BenJarvus Green-Ellis racked up 96 yards on 21 carries against the Colts.

Donald Brown had 68 yards on 17 carries, but 36 of those yards came on one good run. Brown was his usual ineffective self for most of the night. J. Mayo (US Presswire)

Jerod Mayo led the Patriots with 15 tackles, though fellow inside linebacker Gary Guyton stood out more. Guyton had nine tackles.

Ryan Fitzpatrick: 21/34, 316 yards, four touchdowns and two interceptions.

Fred Jackson and Cedric Benson both rushed for over 115 yards.

For the second week in a row, the Bills won and Lee Evans caught just two passes. (Not trying to suggest there’s a correlation between the two.) Steve Johnson has become Buffalo’s No. 1 wideout. He had eight catches for 137 yards and three scores against the Bengals.

For the second straight week, Felix Jones gave the Cowboys 51 yards on the ground. That is his second highest rushing output of the season.

Jahvid Best, who is battling a bad foot, had just two yards on three carries. Or maybe it was three yards on two carries. Anyway, he was a non-factor.

Dez Bryant averaged minus-two yards per catch on all of his non-touchdown receptions Sunday.

Very rarely does a DT lead his team in tackles. That’s what Ndamukong Suh did for the Lions (eight stops).

Before leaving with a re-aggravated groin injury, Clinton Portis looked fresh on five carries (32 yards).

Pilloried all week for poor route running, Redskins wideout Joey Galloway caught three passes for 32 yards. That was three more than Randy Moss caught, by the way.

Titans rookie Marc Mariani recorded his second touchdown return of the season (87 yards on a punt).

It came predominantly in garbage time, but Derek Anderson was 25/46 for 295 yards and a touchdown. And Matt Cassel, who raised the bar for garbage time excellence last week, was a sturdy 15/24 for 193 yards and two touchdowns.

Dwayne Bowe caught two touchdowns, giving him a Chiefs record six-straight games with a touchdown. Bowe is on pace for 1,100 yards and 18 TD’s.

Adrian Wilson led the Cardinals with seven tackles after struggling a week ago.

Thanks to the big deficit, Vikings running back Adrian Peterson got only 14 carries Sunday (72 yards). That was only two more carries than the Packers gave Dimitri Nance (37 yards).

Sidney Rice’s debut: three catches, 56 yards.

Clay Matthews added another sack to his records (league-high 11.5 on the season). He also had two tackles for a loss and two hits on the quarterback.

LaDainian Tomlinson still looks fresh. He only managed 36 yards on 12 carries, but he turned in 71 yards on seven receptions.

Joel Dreessen could wind up keeping the starting tight end job even once Owen Daniels is healthy. Dreessen, who is a slightly better blocker than Daniels, caught four passes for 106 yards and a touchdown.

With RT Damien Woody out, the Texans got three sacks (two from Mario Williams) and seven hits on Mark Sanchez.

Pittsburgh held Oakland to 61 yards rushing, which is par for the course for the Steelers this season.

Jason Campbell was 7/19 for 70 yards and a pick before getting benched in the second half. Bruce Gradkowski finished 13/24 for 98 yards and a pick.

Rashard Mendenhall’s 59 yards rushing were just four more yards than Ben Roethlisberger had on the ground.

James Harrison had two sacks, two tackles for a loss and two hits on the quarterback (one of which drew a ridiculous roughing the passer flag)…and those numbers still don’t describe the depth of his impact Sunday.

Joe Flacco had his first 300-yard passing game of the season against the Panthers.

Ray Lewis got his 30th career interception (and took it to the house).

The Jaguars won despite six turnovers (four from David Garrard).

Peyton Hillis was held to 48 yards on 21 carries, though he produced 95 yards on six receptions.

The Jaguars sacked Colt McCoy six times. Six sacks used to be a half-season for Jacksonville.

Interesting: Michael Turner got 28 carries for Atlanta (131 yards) and Jason Snelling got just one.

Who needs Pierre Thomas? Chris Ivory turned in99 yards on 23 carries for the Saints.

Brandon Stokley, Mike Williams and Ben Obomanu all had at least five catches and 75 yards for the Seahawks.

The 49ers generated only 71 yards on the ground against Tampa Bay’s bottom-feeder run defense. Forty five of those yards came from Troy Smith scrambles.

Mike Williams, barely 48 hours removed from a DUI arrest, caught all three passes thrown his way. Williams finished with 54 yards and a touchdown.

Patrick Willis stamped his ticket to Hawaii: two sacks, two tackles for a loss, two QB hits and a team-high 13 tackles.

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Posted on: November 13, 2010 7:54 pm
 

Week 10 injury news and analysis, part III

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Bengals at Colts


Combined, these two teams have a stunning 28 players on their injury lists.

For the Colts, RB Joseph Addai is doubtful with a neck, and though his replacement, Mike Hart, has performed well, he also is on the injury report – questionable with an ankle (he didn’t participate in practice at all this week). He probably won’t play either. Which means that Donald Brown likely will start and get some help from Javarris James.

Another potential problem for Indianapolis is that starting LBs Clint Session and Gary Brackett (toe) are listed as questionable. Session dislocated his elbow a couple weeks ago, but somehow he found a way to play through the rest of the game. Which was pretty amazing. Of course, he hasn’t been seen since, but still.

The Bengals secondary, meanwhile, won’t have much depth. Starting FS Chris Crocker is doubtful with a bad calf, and nickel back Morgan Trent (knee), who originally was listed as questionable, was downgraded today to out. QB Carson Palmer, who didn’t practice Wednesday or Thursday, is listed as probable with a right shoulder injury.

Texans at Jaguars

Houston WR Andre Johnson, who was listed as questionable and who seems to be fighting injuries every week, apparently will start. Which is nice of him, one supposes. But TE Owen Daniels, battling a bad hamstring, will miss his second-straight game. To replace him, look for Joel Dreessen (five catches for 67 yards last week) to get the start.

For the Jaguars, losing DE Aaron Kampman, who tore his ACL, will give Jacksonville a big void on the defensive line, but other than him, Jacksonville should be relatively healthy. LB Daryl Smith, DE Jeremy Mincey, RB Greg Jones and DT Tyson Alualu are probable.

Vikings at Bears


Now that the Sidney Rice question has been answered – he’s still not recovered from hip surgery and will NOT be active Sunday – we can look to the other two Vikings WRs on the injury list. Namely Percy Harvin, who’s been bothered by migraine headaches this week, and Bernard Berrian, who has a groin issue. Both are listed as questionable. Will Brett Favre have anybody to whom he can throw?

The Vikings secondary doesn’t seem much healthier. CB Asher Allen and S Jamarca Sanford are doubtful, while CB Lito Sheppard (hamstring) and CB Frank Walker (hand) are probable.

Bears C Olin Kreutz is questionable to play with a bad hamstring. He didn’t practice Wednesday or Thursday, but he’s expected to play anyway. And Chicago will need him. Minnesota recorded six sacks last week, and the Vikings will be looking to take down Favre as much as possible.

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Posted on: October 4, 2010 5:38 pm
Edited on: October 4, 2010 6:03 pm
 

Hot Routes 10.4.10: box score tidbits



Posted by Andy Benoit


The Cardinals managed a paltry 124 yards of total offense against the Chargers. And 124 is also only three times the number of points Arizona gave up.

Antonio Gates was targeted seven times. He finished with seven catches for 144 yards and two touchdowns. Those are the type of numbers a player puts up when going up against thin air.

The Chargers defense had nine sacks.

Peyton Manning and Jeff Saturday started their NFL-record 158th game together. (The previous record of 157 was held by Jim Kelly and Kent Hull.)

Donovan McNabb completed just 8/19 passes in his return to Philly. That’s his lowest completion total in a win since his NFL starting debut (which, coincidentally, came against the Redskins).

Santana Moss had zero catches and was targeted just one time.

Quintin Mikell led the Eagles with seven tackles, though none were dynamic enough to make us forget the one he missed (you know, when Ryan Torain plowed over him for a touchdown run).

Arian Foster sat out the first quarter against the Raiders for disciplinary reasons. That allowed Derrick Ward to rise from the dead and finish the day with 12 carries for 80 yards. (Interesting that Steve Slaton wouldn’t get more carries in this instance.) Foster still got his, too. He gained 131 yards on 16 carries, including a sensational 74-yard touchdown.

T. Mays celebrates his TD after he blocked an Atlanta punt (AP). Raiders tight end Zach Miller caught 11 passes for 122 yards and a score. On the other side, Texans backup tight end Joel Dreessen led the team with five catches for 73 yards and a score. (Perhaps the bigger news is that Owen Daniels, in a contract year and coming off a serious knee injury, seems to be assuming a backseat role).

Haloti Ngata had 11 tackles, one sack, two tackles for a loss and two quarterback hits against the Steelers. And yes, in just watching the down-to-down action, Ngata was indeed THAT dominant.

The Saints ran 79 plays Sunday. The Panthers ran 47. The Saints had 27 first downs. The Panthers had 10. (The game was close because the Saints were just 1/5 in the red zone and lost two fumbles.)

Panthers linebacker James Anderson had 16 tackles and a sack.

Saints safety Usama Young played well filling in for an injured Roman Harper. Young led the team with six tackles and recorded a sack and a tackle for a loss.

Seahawks running back Justin Forsett looked much better against the Rams than his 19-carry, 65-yards stat line suggests. Forsett showed great initial quickness and lateral agility between the tackles. Credit the Rams linebackers and defensive backs for keeping him in check.

Seahawks defensive end Chris Clemons had two sacks for the second straight week.

Kyle Orton threw for 341 yards against the Titans. He also attempted 50 passes for the third time this season (the Broncos are 1-2 when he does).

Brandon Lloyd and Eddie Royal both went over 100 receiving yards. It was Lloyd’s third 100-yard game of the season. Denver also had two 100-yard receivers against the Colts (Lloyd and Jabar Gaffney).

Chris Johnson’s longest run against the Broncos went for just eight yards. His backup, Javon Ringer, ripped off a 54-yarder. (To be fair, Ringer was ultimately chased down on that run; Johnson would have taken it to the house.)

Dave Ball had 2.5 of Tennessee’s six sacks of Kyle Orton.

The Lions ran 78 total plays; the Packers ran 40. A week after setting a franchise record with penalties 18 penalties for 152 yards, Green Bay benefitted from 13 Detroit penalties totaling 102 yards.

Charles Woodson recorded his 10th interception return for a touchdown, third most in NFL history. (Rod Woodson holds the record with 12; Sharper is next with 11. Deion Sanders had 9.)

Jordy Nelson lost two fumbles for the Packers. (And the lost fumbles never turned up…we think someone from the Lions may have found them.)

Brandon Pettigrew had a career day, catching eight passes for 91 yards. He’s another guy who has successfully bounced back from a late ’09 ACL injury.

Taylor Mays did not just have a spectacular blocked punt touchdown for the 49ers, he also led the team with 11 tackles. Looks like Michael Lewis won’t be getting his starting job back any time soon.

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Posted on: September 23, 2010 3:45 pm
Edited on: September 23, 2010 3:48 pm
 

Week 3 Key Matchup: Texans O vs. DeMarcus Ware

Posted by Andy Benoit

As Week 3 inter-conference matchups go, they don’t get much bigger than Sunday’s Cowboys @ Texans showdown (insert everything’s big in Texas joke here) At least, not from the Cowboys’ side of things. Win and they’re right in thick of the NFC East. Lose and they’re 0-3, facing a week of intense Wade Phillips hot seat chatter.

Offensively, the Cowboys have to get the wheels turning in their ground game (139 yards on 42 carries so far doesn’t cut it). Their passing game is too talented to contain if Tony Romo has the benefit of play-action.

But the key to beating Houston is generating big plays defensively. The Texans have a prolific offense…sort of. It’s an offense that has ranked in the top five in yards each of the past two seasons, but it’s also an offense that ranked 10th in scoring last season and 17th in scoring in 2008. In other words, they don’t always capitalize on their firepower. A big reason is, as history shows, this team can be forced into making mistakes.
D. Ware (US Presswire)
The best way to force offensive mistakes is to generate pressure on the quarterback. It doesn’t have to be sacks – just pressure. (For what it’s worth, the Jets understand this concept better than any team in football.)

Karma seems to be on Dallas’s side this week. On Tuesday, Texans left tackle Duane Brown was suspended four games for violating the league’s policy on performance enhancing substances. Thus, fifth-year tackle Rashad Butler will get his first career start Sunday.

The Cowboys are salivating at the thought of DeMarcus Ware facing Butler one-on-one. No team creates favorable pass-rushing matchups for its top star as effectively as the Cowboys do for Ware. They always try to align him on the open side of the offensive formation (i.e. away from the tight end). You may notice that Ware often gets in his stance at the very last second before the snap. This is to prevent teams from motioning a tight end to his side.

This formula works well because a.) Ware is a beast to block one-on-one and b.) Dallas’ other outside linebacker, Anthony Spencer, is one of the best high-traffic players in the game. That is to say, Spencer sheds blocks and maneuvers through bodies with great aplomb. His skill set is ideal for combating offensive tackles and tight ends simultaneously.

Of course, the offense ultimately holds the power when it comes to matchups on the outside edges of the line of scrimmage. If the Texans want to prevent a Ware-Butler one-on-one situation, they can. They can always keep a running back in to chip. They can always put a tight end in motion to shadow Ware (the tight end would be a de facto sixth offensive lineman in this case).

The problem, however, is this goes against the mantra of Gary Kubiak’s offense. Houston relies on its tight ends, particularly budding star Owen Daniels, as extra receivers in the passing game. Sure, Kevin Walter can fill the inside receiving void if Daniels stays in to block (in which case Jacoby Jones would play the outside). But if the Texans are willing to sacrifice the threat of Daniels in the passing game, they might as well go with the bigger, more physical Joel Dreessen as their tight end. But if they do that, they’re banking on Dreessen having a bang-up game as a blocking tight end. Dreessen is decent in this capacity but not spectacular.

Another solution could be to spread the Cowboys out and go with a quick-striking passing attack. This would keep the tight ends involved through the air and minimize the burden on Rashad Butler (instead of blocking Ware for three seconds on a play, Butler would only have to block him for one or two). Also, this could test the questionable depth of Dallas’ secondary. Plus, it would make it nearly impossible for the Cowboys to double-team Andre Johnson, as the safety over the top would be too far away from the action to be relevant.

Given the impact that the pas-rush will have in this game – remember, Dallas’ offensive line is struggling and will have to face Mario Williams – the winning team will probably be the one that can build a big enough lead to dictate tempo.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com