Tag:Richie Incognito
Posted on: December 9, 2011 6:16 pm
Edited on: December 10, 2011 1:43 am
 

Seymour fined $30K; Pettigrew, Mayo punished

PettigrewBy Josh Katzowitz

The NFL lesson of the week: don’t punch a fellow player or touch an official in anything other than a loving matter. Otherwise, the NFL is going to take a few bucks out of your wallet. This, of course, isn’t news, but considering Richard Seymour is a repeat offender, maybe this IS a lesson he needs to continue to learning.

Anyway, here’s a roundup of some of the biggest fines levied by the league this week.

Richard Seymour, $30,000: Seymour was tagged $25,000 last year when he struck Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger with an open hand, but the NFL has decided a second violation (when he gave Miami's Richie Incognito the business last Sunday) only was worth $5,000 more. As Rapid Reporter Eric Gillman points out, that’s three ejections in three seasons with the Raiders for Seymour, so, really, you have to applaud his consistency.

Jerod Mayo, $25,000: As Rapid Reporter Greg Bedard points out, Mayo was tagged for roughing Colts quarterback Dan Orlovsky and striking him in the head and neck area. This, even though Mayo wasn’t flagged during the game for the alleged penalty.

Brandon Pettigrew, $25,000: The NFL just HATES it when a player makes contact with an official, even if the contact was somewhat inadvertent and not necessarily intended for said official. But Pettigrew got caught bumping an official while going after Saints safety Roman Harper, and thus he gets a big fine, via Rapid Reporter John Kreger. Why he wasn’t kicked out of the game immediately, we don’t know.

Shaun Chapas, $20,000: You want to know why Chapas is having a bad day? Because, as ESPN Dallas writes, Chapas, a rookie Cowboys fullback, made a little more than $22,000 last Sunday, but since he blind-sided Cardinals linebacker Reggie Walker, the NFL wants to take most of that away. Also, Chapas wasn’t penalized on the play.

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Posted on: May 7, 2011 1:22 pm
 

AFC East draft truths revealed

Posted by Andy Benoit

One of the best things about the draft is that from it we can find out what teams really think about their current players. Excluding examples of teams filling obvious needs, here are some of the more revealing draft picks from 2011, with a quick blurb of what the team was really saying by making this pick.

Buffalo Bills

1st round, Marcel Dareus, DT, Alabama
Deep down we know we’ll never really run a 3-4 defense.

3rd round, Kelvin Sheppard, ILB, LSU
But just in case we do….

4th round, Da’Norris Searcy, SS, North Carolina
Replace Donte Whitner? Heavens no, we wouldn’t have him do that! We’ll have Searcy replace backup George Wilson…and let Wilson be the guy to replace Whitner.

Miami DolphinsM. Pouncey (US Presswire)

1st round, Mike Pouncey, G/C, Florida
We’re still not entirely sure if Richie Incognito is a guard or a center. So, we got an even better tweener to shape that decision around.

New England Patriots

1st round, Nate Solder, OT, Colorado
The hints of decline that veteran left tackle Matt Light showed last season are only going to get worse. No way we’ll pay him market value.
P.S. Sebastian Vollmer’s future is at right tackle.

2nd round, Ras-I Dowling, CB, Virginia
It’s a tradition around here to draft corners in the second round. Plus, Kyle Arrington has no ball skills.

2nd round, Shane Vereen, RB, California
We need to replace Sammy Morris and Fred Taylor. Also, we wouldn’t mind letting some other team overpay BenJarvus Green-Ellis once he becomes an unrestricted free agent.

3rd round, Stevan Ridley, RB, LSU
Just in case Vereen turns out to be a flop.

3rd round, Ryan Mallett, QB, Arkansas
Even we’re not sure exactly why we did this. But we’ll figure something out.

New York Jets

4th round, Bilal Powell, RB, Louisville
We can’t shake the images of Joe McKnight throwing up at camp last year.

Check back throughout the week for other division’s Draft Truths Revealed. To see all Draft Truths Revealed, click the “Draft Truths” tag.

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Posted on: April 6, 2011 2:19 pm
Edited on: April 6, 2011 3:20 pm
 

Offseason Checkup: Miami Dolphins

Posted by Josh Katzowitz



Eye on Football's playing doctor for every NFL team with our Offseason Check-ups .



Entering their Monday Night Football matchup against the Patriots in Week 4, the Dolphins had to be feeling confident in their chances of beating New England in Miami. The Dolphins defense had looked good in knocking off the Bills and Vikings (which, at the time, was considered a pretty good win), and then Miami played the Jets to a close loss before the Patriots came to town.

A 41-14 disaster later, Miami fired special teams coach John Bonamego and never got more than a game above .500 for the rest of the season (and, in fact, finished the year at 7-9).



Coach on the hot seat, quarterback

Although Tony Sparano took a 1-15 team and turned it into an 11-5 division title winner a year later (beating out the Patriots for the honor), he’s gone 7-9 in back-to-back seasons. Apparently, owner Stephen Ross listened to Bill Parcells’ recommendation and decided to bring back Sparano for another season (though Ross DID disgustingly go out of his way to woo Jim Harbaugh for the job). But the specter of Jon Gruden and Bill Cowher still are out there and until Sparano is off the hot seat, fans will wonder about their availability.

Sparano would get a great deal of help if QB Chad Henne could put together a consistent season. WR Brandon Marshall blasted his QB at the end of last season and said he actually works better with QB Tyler Thigpen (a major ZING, by the way). It’s too early to give up on Henne, especially now that Chad Pennington will miss all of 2011 because of a torn ACL, but it’s getting to the point where Henne needs to show somebody something.




1. Running back
On paper, the duo of Ronnie Brown and Ricky Williams would seem a surefire way for the Dolphins to rack up rushing yards and plenty of touchdowns. Yet, the Dolphins managed to finish 21st in running last season. There’s a good chance that neither back will return to Miami next year, leaving Patrick Cobbs and Lex Hilliard on the roster at RB. Which means the Dolphins will need some big-time help at that spot and which is why Alabama’s Mark Ingram might be a good draft pick (though the Dolphins might want to trade down instead).

2. Offensive line
You know what doesn’t help your third-string quarterback perform better? A terribly inconsistent offensive line. That’s what Tyler Thigpen faced in Miami’s 16-0 loss to the Bears in Week 11 – a line missing starters Jake Long and Joe Berger who then watched backup Cory Procter get injured on the second offensive series, meaning Richie Incognito had to move from guard to center. Miami could make a play for a solid center in the draft.

3. Keep improving the defense
n 2009, the Dolphins ranked 25th in the league in defense, but last year, they improved that number to No. 13. Most of the starting front seven is solid, but Miami’s DBs had a tough time hanging onto interceptions last season. It also would help if they got more playmakers in the secondary.




After Ross stopped emasculating Sparano for Harbaugh and then gave him a two-year extension, Ross made it clear he wanted a more aggressive, more exciting offense. Sparano, though, said he plans to keep running the ball more often than not. Could we see both? I suppose, though I kind of doubt it.

I also don’t see a playoff run with Miami, considering the Patriots and Jets still will be battling for AFC East supremacy. All of which means the meddling Ross probably will fire Sparano, and then, everybody can just start over again in Miami. Which means we might not see good pro football in Miami for a while.

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Posted on: November 19, 2010 10:31 pm
 

Dolphins O-line should get some help

J. Berger should be ready to return by Miami's next game vs. Oakland (US Presswire). Posted by Josh Katzowitz

You probably saw Thursday night (or, considering how many people don’t have the NFL Network, you might have read it somewhere) how bad the Dolphins offensive line performed.

QB Tyler Thigpen, who took six sacks (three from Julius Peppers alone), was molested throughout the game by the Bears defense, and partially as a result, Miami racked up 226 offensive yards and exactly zero points.

When your quarterback is taking a pounding and your top-two running backs (Ronnie Brown and Ricky Williams) are combining for 11 yards on six carries, you know you might need to call for reinforcements – especially with LT Jake Long’s shoulder badly hurting him.

The Dolphins will get some help in time for their Nov. 28 meeting with the Raiders.

According to the Miami Herald, starter Joe Berger, who missed Thursday’s game with a knee problem and a “personal issue,” should be ready to play.

Without him Thursday, backup Cory Proctor got the start, but in the second offensive series of the game, he suffered a knee injury. That meant Richie Incognito – whose day job is to play guard – moved to the center spot.

Yes, the Dolphins have many, many problems on offense, but assuming Berger returns for the team’s next game, at least they can focus on improving their third-string-turned-starting QB and from keeping their star WR from throwing the ball wherever he wants after a play is complete.

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Posted on: September 13, 2010 2:21 pm
 

Alex Barron isn't the only one who holds

Posted by Andy Benoit

Apparently, it’s Dump-On-Alex-Barron Day today. So we’ll tell you that, with three holding calls in the final 31 minutes against the Redskins Sunday Night (including the game-loser), the former Ram and now current Cowboy offensive tackles ranks second amongst all NFL players in holding penalties over the last five years. C. Rabach (US Presswire)

Mike Sando of ESPN.com was kind enough to publish the top five (numbers through last season):

1. Casey Rabach, 23

2. Mike Gandy, 20 (now out of the league)

3. Alex Barron, 19 (again, prior to last night)

4. Jammal Browns, 19

5t. Robert Gallery, 16 (impressive considering he’s missed some games)

5t. Richie Incognito, 16 (imagine if we were counting personal fouls, huh?)

5t. Jeff Backus, 16

5t. Ben Hamilton, 16


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Posted on: September 7, 2010 3:03 pm
Edited on: September 7, 2010 3:07 pm
 

AFC position battles finally decided

Posted by Andy Benoit

One of the more interesting aspects of Week 1 is learning all the winners of the training camp position battles. Here’s a rundown and analysis on some of the players who have officially earned a new starting job in the AFC. 

Derrick Johnson & Javon Belcher, ILB’s, Chiefs D. Johnson (US Presswire)

Both players handled nickel linebacking duties last season. Now, they’re replacing Demorrio Williams and Corey Mays in the starting lineup. Johnson, a former first-round pick who runs like a deer, should have replaced Williams last season. Coaches were looking for more physicality, though (Johnson is far better in space than he is in traffic). Belcher replacing Mays is a surprise. Mays’ critics love to gripe about the fifth-year pro’s lack of open-field speed. But for the type of speed that matters at inside linebacker – such as lateral speed and closing speed at the point of contact – Mays is excellent. Still, coaches are giving the more athletic Belcher a crack. Belcher was an undrafted rookie last season.

Justin Smiley, LG, Jaguars

In a long-anticipated move, Vince Manuwai moves to the second string in order to make room for newcomer Justin Smiley. Manuwai hasn’t been the same since blowing out his knee in 2008. Smiley, when he’s not battling shoulder problems, is one of the premiere run-blockers in the game. He is tremendous on inside pulls.

Anthony Smith & Sean Considine, S, Jaguars

This is more of an admonishment of Gerald Alexander and Reggie Nelson than testimonial for Smith and Considine. The Jaguars are making it clear that they expect sharp awareness and at least somewhat physical tackling from the safety position. Hopefully, they’re not expecting speed, because Considine offers little of that. He’ll play primarily in the box. Smith was a disappointment as a third-round pick in Pittsburgh, but physically-speaking, he was Jacksonville’s most impressive safety in training camp.

Joe Berger, C, Dolphins

Incumbent Jake Grove is a better player than Berger – much better, in fact. But frequent injuries make the seventh-year veteran unreliable (why do you think the Raiders dealt him to Miami in the first place?). Berger gives the Dolphins more stability on a week-to-week basis. That’s a big deal when you’re integrating two new guards (John Jerry and Richie Incognito).

C.J. Spiller, RB, Bills

With Fred Jackson missing the preseason with a hand injury and Marshawn Lynch sitting out until the final game with an ankle injury, Spiller was able to snag more reps than initially planned. The explosive first-round pick was destined for the starting job anyway. Looks like he’ll have it right away.

Wade Smith, LG, Texans

When they signed him, coaches initially thought the journeyman utility veteran would be an excellent fit in the team’s zone-blocking system. Smith did nothing to change their minds. Helping Smith’s cause was the fact that last year’s starter, Kasey Studdard, struggles to consistently sustain blocks in pass protection.

Left guard is solved, but the Texans still haven’t figured out their starting right guard. Rumor has it that Mike Brisiel and Antoine Caldwell could wind up taking turns in Week 1.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com