Tag:Matt Hasselbeck
Posted on: August 17, 2011 4:24 pm
 

Roundtable: Which rookie QB will help the most?

C. Newton could be one of the breakout rookie QBs this year (Getty).

Posted by Eye on Football staff

Well, we're a week into the preseason and that means we know everything about everyone. Or nothing at all. Whatever, we got our first glimpses of the NFL's newest rookie quarterbacks and that leads us to the question: What rookie quarterback will help his team the most?

Will Brinson: Go ahead and cue up about 15 "Panthers homer" comments in the next few paragraphs, but I don't care: Cam Newton. The guy's a freak-a-deak athlete with a firehose attached to his right shoulder and he's going to get a chance to produce. Unfortunately, that firehose thing can also be bad if Newton can't control his accuracy. And it's possible that Jimmy Clausen -- who looked better than terrible after he threw a pick six on his second passing attempt -- could be the safer option for Carolina. But Newton gets the fanbase amped and he's already shown exponential growth since we last saw him throwing passes. Putting him in the proverbial fire's the way to go and he'll be a difference maker for Carolina in both the stands and the field.

Josh Katzowitz: Will, I couldn't agree with you more. I don't know if Newton will help his team that much more on the field than Clausen would have -- I'm willing to bet heavily on the odds that there are going to be games when Newton is ABSOLUTELY terrible and people are going to be saying, "Yeah, buddy, the NFL is a little different than the limited offense you ran at Auburn, eh?" (these people, of course, will be Canadians who care way too much about SEC football) -- but as far as starpower is concerned, Newton is the one. I don't care if he privately looks at himself as an entertainer and an icon. He's got that huge smile and he's got that charisma, and eventually, the stink of whatever NCAA rules his dad might have violated will wash away.

That said, I don't think he's going to contend for any rookie of the year honors, because as the season goes along, defenses are going to begin to figure out Newton. Actually, I think the real answer to your question about which rookie will help his team the most will end up being Colin Kaepernick in San Francisco, assuming he stays healthy behind that poor offensive line. Alex Smith will continue to be Alex Smith, and midway through the season, Jim Harbaugh will call upon Kaepernick to replace Smith and win a few games for the 49ers. And I think he'll do it, especially in the NFC West, hastening Smith's departure (which, when you think about it, might be the single biggest reason how Kaepernick impacts the team). Newton will help his franchise the most, but Kaepernick will help his team the most.

Ryan Wilson
: We talked about it (at length, I might add) and Newton was impressive. I know, it's just one preseason game, but the guy's come a long way since February, the Auburn scandal, and the silly comments about being an entertainer and an icon.

And let's be honest, he's energized fans that had every reason to lose all hope and commit their energies to supporting NASCAR full time. That can't be understated. Winning is obviously the goal, but Panthers fans will find reasons for optimism if the Panthers can win five or six games. So in terms of therapeutic value for a downtrodden fan base, Newton is this season's most valuable QB.

A. Dalton could be the starting QB in Cincinnati (Getty). But if we're talking about a QB who has a chance to play and help his team win enough games to battle for a playoff spot, I'm going with Christian Ponder. Partly because Myron Rolle thinks he's a genius, but also because Donovan McNabb has become a punchline in recent years. How long until he's yanked in favor of Ponder? Four weeks? Remember: this is the guy who not only lost his job to Rex Grossman last season, he was eventually demoted to third string behind John Beck, he of four career starts, all losses, all coming in 2007.

Brinson: Well, we're one full turn around the table and the only person we haven't talked about is the only guy who's virtually guaranteed to start Week 1: Andy Dalton.

So, um, yeaaaaaaah.

What does that say about the Bengals? (And why do I have the feeling Josh will try to defend them?) I guess it says either that "We don't respect Andy Dalton," "We forgot about Andy Dalton," or "Even if Andy Dalton was Peyton Manning, he wouldn't be saving the Bengals from certain doom in 2011."

Perhaps it's all three?

Wilson: I didn't mention Andy Dalton for the same reason I don't think about paying my mortgage every day: if I ignore it, it don't exist. It's a coping mechanism. In Dalton's case, it means I'm not constantly reminded of what the 2011 season inevitably holds for him: pain, misery, disappointment -- all words that have become synonymous with the Bengals in recent years.

(Just look what the madness did to even-keeled Carson Palmer -- it drove him right into retirement in what should be the prime of his career. Think about that for a minute. Things were so god-awful in Cincinnati that Palmer would rather sit around the house doing crosswords than get caught up in tiger-striped maelstrom for another season.)

While we shouldn't put too much stock in first-ever preseason performances, Dalton's got his introduction to big-boy football from, fittingly, Ndamukong Suh. And I feel that was just a preview of things to come in 2011 (for both Dalton and Suh). So, yeah, it's pretty easy to be down on Dalton, more because he's a victim of circumstance. Which is why I don't want to think about it.

Brinson: Thanks for the reminder on the mortgage payment, jerk. Speaking of which, if there's one thing that the Panthers, 49ers, Titans, Vikings, Jaguars and Bengals have in common it's that they mortgaged their future on the talents of the 2011 NFL Draft class. With that in mind, let's wrap up this puppy up by making a list -- how do you gents rank the rookies in terms of impact on the 2011 season? Here's mine. Don't copy it.

1. Cam Newton
2. Blaine Gabbert
3. Andy Dalton
4. Christian Ponder
5. Jake Locker
6. Colin Kaepernick
7. Ryan Mallet
8. Terrelle Pryor

PonderWilson: No matter the list -- or the topic -- one thing is assured: Brinson will put Cam Newton at the top of it. Panthers fan solidarity and whatnot.

Back on Earth...

1. Christian Ponder (He'll be starting before the end of Sept.)
2. Colin Kaepernick (See above)
3. Blaine Gabbert (He'll be starting before Halloween)
4. Cam Newton (The next Jimmy Clausen? JOKE. Clearly, he's the next Chris Weinke.)
5. Andy Dalton (Must've been a serial killer in a previous life to get stuck with this fate.)
6. Jake Locker (Should only play if Hasselbeck gets injured.)
7. Ryan Mallett (Bill Belichick is a genius. That is all.)
8. Terrelle Pryor (But he's a first-round pick!)

Katzowitz: Just in case, Will needs a reminder: Here's my takedown of Mike Brown and Marvin Lewis in that ridiculous news conference they called to announce that Lewis would return for another season, and here's what I wrote about the Bengals' lack of a practice bubble. I lived in Cincinnati for six years, but believe me when I say that I think the Bengals are an incompetent mess (though, personally, I think Mike Brown is a nice man).

My list (the correct one):

1. Colin Kaepernick (If Mike Singletary thought about replacing Alex Smith with David Carr (!) last season, Jim Harbaugh shouldn't have a problem replacing Smith with Kaepernick)
2. Christian Ponder (Because he's better than Rex Grossman, and since Grossman is better than Donovan McNabb ...)
3. Cam Newton (How disturbing would it be if Clausen actually won the starting job?)
4. Andy Dalton (He still has Cedric Benson to lean on)
5. Blaine Gabbert (I'm not sure he can beat out David Garrard, and I'm not sure Garrard will be bad enough this year to warrant starting Gabbert)
6. Jake Locker (Locker will get tons of help from Hasselbeck)
7. Ryan Mallett (He won't even beat out Brian Hoyer to be Brady's backup)
8. Terrelle Pryor (I don't know, maybe, he could be an effective NFL TE?)

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Posted on: August 11, 2011 5:15 pm
Edited on: August 11, 2011 7:21 pm
 

Titans ready to make Johnson 'highest-paid RB'?

Posted by Ryan Wilson

UPDATE 6:30 p.m.: Via the Twitter feed of Titans' beat reporter Jim Wyatt: "Asked about being offered a deal after lockout, Johnson said: 'Maybe they talked, but I guarantee we never received any offer.'" 

-------

Titans running back Chris Johnson wants a new contract. Given that he's one of the two best running backs in the league and is set to make just $800,000 in 2011, he's right. The problem, at least until Thursday, is that Tennessee general manager Mike Reinfeldt said that the club wasn't willing to negotiate with Johnson until he ended his holdout. As of this writing, Johnson has been a no-show at training camp, even when faced with the possibility of losing a year of accrued free agency.

We've long been of the opinion that the Titans shouldn't pay Johnson "Adrian Peterson money," even if he's worth it because, in general, running backs are fungible. You can find productive players for a fraction of the cost with either late(r)-round draft picks or the waiver wire.

CBSSports.com's Gregg Doyel disagrees with us, and luckily for Johnson, it sounds like Reinfeldt does, too.

According to the Associated Press Thursday, Reinfeldt wants to make Johnson the NFL's highest-paid running back, he just needs Johnson to show up first.

The AP also reports that Johnson's agent was the first person Reinfeldt called once the lockout ended, and Reinfeldt says that the two sides have already talked about the parameters of a new deal for Johnson, and they'd like to get him in training camp to learn new head coach Mike Munchak's new offense while negotiations are finished.

We're not sure if Reinfeldt is performing the one-man version of "Good Cop, Bad Cop," or if he suddenly felt compelled to take his message public, but either way, the timing seems odd.

Surely, Johnson and his agent knew that the Titans wanted the running back in camp before any new deal was drawn up, but at the same time, if Tennessee deems Johnson so important to their future, why don't they go ahead and, you know, make him the "NFL's highest-paid back?" Especially when Johnson made it clear that last year was the "last time (I'll report to camp) without me having a long-term deal. … It won't happen again."

And so far, he's kept his word.

The problem for the Titans, assuming they consider Johnson an integral part of their offense (and it sure seems that they do), is that either Matt Hasselbeck or Jake Locker will be under center. One's a grizzled veteran; the other the franchise's future, and both are in dire need of a running game to insure they don't get clobbered on a regular basis.

It's seldom the case that a player has leverage in a drawn-out contract dispute, but Johnson seems to be in pretty good shape right about now.

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Posted on: August 10, 2011 1:50 pm
 

Hasselbeck not worried by Chris Johnson's absence

Posted by Ryan Wilson

Still no sign of Chris Johnson in Tennessee. He wants a new contract (he's currently slated to make $800,000), but the Titans say they won't negotiate until he comes to camp. So Johnson remains MIA, even though the new collective bargaining agreement stipulates that if holdouts don't show up by August 9, they could lose a year of accrued free agency.

As CBSSports.com's Josh Katzowitz wrote Tuesday, "Johnson probably isn’t worried about his free agent status because, assuming he gets the long-term deal that he wants, the year he’s losing won’t matter at all."

This assumes, of course, that Johnson gets paid. (While we think Johnson's one of the two best backs in the league, we don't think the Titans should give him "Adrian Peterson money" -- or anything close to it.)

This has to be very troubling for Johnson's teammates, the guys relying on him to help carry this offense in 2011, right? Not if you're talking to Tennessee's new (old) quarterback, Matt Hasselbeck, who will pull down $9 million this year to serve as Jake Locker's mentor and start a few games, too.

Appearing on the Dan Patrick Show, Hasselbeck was asked if he was more concerned about Johnson's holdout or Kenny Britt's string of off-field issues. “I’m not concerned about either one," he said, according to PFT.com.

Turns out, this isn't Hasselbeck's first holdout rodeo.

“I played in Seattle when Walter Jones was doing his holdout thing,” he said. “He was holding out and he’d show up on Wednesday before the first game. And the feeling in the building was, We know Walter Jones is good enough just to show up, and the best part about this is that there’s no chance he gets hurt. No chance someone rolls up on his ankle or knee or whatever. We know that we’re at least going to have him healthy.

"I’ve sort of been there,” he added. “Not stressing about that.”

And Johnson could probably show up the Wednesday before the first game and be productive, too. The difference is that the Seahawks would've been hard-pressed to win without Jones. For as good as Johnson is, the Titans can win without him. (Tennessee won 13 games CJ's rookie season, eight games in 2009 and six games in '10.) That's the nature of the game; you build an offense around a franchise QB and a left tackle who can protect him, not an all-galaxy running back.

We mentioned it last week but it Bears repeating here: the previous eight Super Bowl winners didn't have a high-priced, top-5 running back on the roster. What they did have, however, was a franchise quarterback. Teams can survive without one but not the other.

But hey, we applaud Johnson for his convictions. There's something to be said for not making stuff up.

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Posted on: August 1, 2011 10:14 am
 

Johnson wants new deal, Titans want him in camp

Posted by Ryan Wilson

With all the excitement about there finally being football, and the subsequent frenetic pace to free agency and the start of training camps, it's easy for some story lines to get lost in the mix.

Take the Titans, for example. They signed veteran quarterback Matt Hasselbeck to help rookie Jake Locker find his way into the starting lineup. The Titans also released Vince Young, the former franchise quarterback who is now playing on a one-year deal in Philadelphia.

Whoever ends up under center in Tennessee will rely heavily on the running game. This assumes that Chris Johnson, one of the two best backs in the NFL in recent years, isn't still holding out. Johnson hinted at that eventuality in June, when players were organizing workouts and the lockout was still in full swing.

NFL Network's Jason La Canfora wrote at the time that, "The idea of another 'band-aid' deal, after three highly productive seasons, isn't appealing to Johnson, and a contract in the range of the $5 million per season extension that Jamaal Charles signed with the Kansas City Chiefs last season isn't what he's thinking, either. Johnson has talked in the past about wanting to join the ranks of those garnering $30 million in guaranteed money, and if the free-agent cash begins flying around in a furious manner post-lockout, don't expect his desire to wane."

So it wasn't much of a surprise that Johnson wasn't there Sunday night when the Titans held their first practice open to the public. And it sounds like he won't be showing up without a new contract. “It won’t happen again,” Johnson said, according to the Tennessean's Jim Wyatt. “This is the last time without me having a long-term deal.”

One problem: the Titans won't negotiate as long as Johnson holds out.

“We told Chris and his agent we are willing to sit down and talk about a contract, but he needs to get into camp before we are willing to do that,’’ Titans general manager Mike Reinfeldt said. “That is kind of our position. He needs to be here with the rest of the Titans, getting ready to play games.

“He is a good football player, we have a good relationship with Chris and his agent and we hope that would continue. (But) he is under contact. He should be here; everybody else is. It’s the right way to do it.”

Johnson's currently slated to make $800,000 in 2011. Given his production in recent seasons (including 2,006 rushing yards and 14 TDs in 2009), he's due a raise. The problem -- at least for Johnson -- is that it doesn't make salary-cap sense to pay him a deal that includes, say, $30 million in guarantees. Running backs are fungible; alternatives to Johnson are out there and much, much cheaper.

And for the Titans, that means more flexibility to address other roster needs. To put it another way, Johnson rushed for more than 3,300 yards and scored 25 TDs the last two seasons and the Titans went 8-8 and 6-10.

NFL Network's Solomon Wilcots sees it differently. “Let’s face it, Chris Johnson is the straw that stirs the drink for that football team. He has done so much for them over the past three seasons and they’re going to lean on him again. … Without [him], they’re not going to strike fear into teams. It would be hard for them to win it all. The Titans have to get that situation worked out as soon as possible and make him happy.”

We agree. The Titans need to work this out. What they shouldn't do, however, is pay Johnson a huge chunk of change (even if he's worth it -- and he is) because we've seen how this movie ends.

If you're still not convinced, how about this: the previous eight Super Bowl winners didn't have a high-priced, top-5 running back on the roster. What they did have, however, was a franchise quarterback. Teams can survive without one but not the other.

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Posted on: July 27, 2011 9:44 am
 

Report: Titans set to cut Vince Young

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Though this won’t come as a surprise to just about everybody who follows the NFL -- you know, because of Matt Hasselbeck signing -- the Titans will waive QB Vince Young on Thursday. That’s according to TitanInsider.com’s Terry McCormick.

As CBSSports.com’s Ryan Wilson pointed out the other day, the Titans have to cut Young as soon as possible so they don’t have to pay him his $4.25 million roster bonus.

And now we wonder where Young will be headed.

Not Seattle and, obviously, not Tennessee. Probably not Minnesota, considering that’s probably where Donovan McNabb is headed. Where does that leave him? Miami or Arizona, perhaps? Maybe Washington?

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Posted on: July 27, 2011 8:22 am
Edited on: July 27, 2011 12:57 pm
 

Hasselbeck to sign three-year deal with Titans

HasselbeckPosted by Josh Katzowitz

Free agent QB Matt Hasselbeck has a new home, and new Titans coach Mike Munchak has a new signal-caller.

Per CBSSports.com’s Mike Freeman, the 35-year-old Hasselbeck will sign a multi-year deal with the Titans worth a reported $21 million over three years. That means the SeahawksHasselbeck’s former employer who signed Tarvaris Jackson on Tuesday – are officially done with him, and that means Vince Young is out in Tennessee.

It’s also tremendous news for rookie QB Jake Locker. With the retirement of Kerry Collins, Locker was looking at starting in Tennessee with no veteran leadership around him to let him learn.

Now, Hasselbeck probably will take the first-team snaps while Locker gets to learn what it’s like to be an NFL quarterback.

Hasselbeck's new destination
Hasselbeck also will be a good team guy, considering he helped lead the offseason Seahawks workouts, despite knowing there was a good chance he wouldn’t be back in Seattle.

In fact, Freeman thinks Tennessee made such a good move that the Titans are heading for the playoffs. While that’s still going to be a tough bet with the Colts still in the AFC South, it’s an interesting thought. Chances are, unlike last year when Hasselbeck led the 7-9 Seahawks to the postseason, Tennessee actually will have to own a winning record to make the playoffs.

Now, the next step for Tennessee: making sure RB Chris Johnson doesn’t hold out in hopes of getting more money from the Titans.

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Posted on: July 26, 2011 8:49 pm
Edited on: July 27, 2011 8:35 am
 

Assessing the NFL free agency and trade QB market

Posted by Will Brinson



We knew Tuesday's free-agency action wasn't going to be "calm." But man-oh-man did things heat up late, what with the Panthers dropping the equivalent of Charlotte's gross annual income on defensive end Charles Johnson, and the Redskins and Ravens making moves for their own free agents.

If anything, it showed that teams who have favorable relationships with their current players did get a bit of an advantage during this hectic offseason. But what about teams who need to find help -- specifically, quarterback help -- from the outside? Well, there's a market, but it's percolating more often than my coffee pot Tuesday.

So let's break down the values of the three biggest names out there, shall we?

Kevin Kolb
Kolb's the hottest target on the market, but is he the quarterback most guaranteed to succeed with a new team next year? Not necessarily, but it doesn't matter.

His value's done nothing but skyrocket since the lockout began, and it sure does seem like all the reports that he's locked into the Cardinals will come into fruition.

The Cardinals are reportedly keeping their options open -- Kent Somers of the Arizona Republic reported on Tuesday that Arizona was talking with Denver about Kyle Orton as well as discussing the possibility of adding Marc Bulger and Matt Hasselbeck -- but the reality is they're not just trying to secure a quarterback for 2011.

They're also trying to secure a quarterback for the future and make sure they don't risk losing superstar wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald to the open market should he become disgruntled.

Lest you think that matters to the Cardinals, who were in the Super Bowl just a few years ago, wait until push comes to shove and the marketplace starts to bear itself out.

For now, Arizona's front office can pretend to play chicken with the Eagles in a deal for Kolb. Once things become a little clearer and quarterbacks begin aligning with various teams (see: Seattle jumping on the bandwagon that is Tarvaris Jackson) there won't be nearly enough leverage hanging out there for the Cardinals to lean on.

Potential Suitors
: Arizona Cardinals, Miami Dolphins
Best Bet
: It's the Cards by a longshot now that the Seahawks are ruled out. Miami could come sprinting around the turn at the last minute, but at this point it would be a borderline surprise if Kolb wasn't traded to Arizona.

Kyle Orton
Orton's the de facto red herring for the Cards (see: above) apparently, but if you poll most folks, they'll probably at least agree he can be as productive in the right system as Kolb.

In fact, Orton's piled up more than 3,500 yards and 20 touchdowns each of the last two years. And get THIS: each of those years equated to a large total of both yardage and touchdowns than Kolb has in his entire career.

Yes I'm aware that Kolb's only started seven games in his four years in the league and, yes, I'm aware that he's had a rough go of things given that no one really saw Michael Vick usurping his would-be throne in Philly.

But none of that bad luck guarantees that he'll succeed any more than someone like Orton who has two clear-cut years of production in the right system.

My counting-stats rant aside, Kolb's still the top guy available, but there's definitely a market for Orton. And one spot that really makes sense is Miami, where the Dolphins have struggled since Dan Marino retired to find a suitable replacement under center.

Those struggles have manifested themselves in the continual wasting of second-round picks and -- lo and behold! -- that's exactly what everyone thinks Denver wants in return for Orton.

Rather than gambling on another rookie down the road, it seems reasonable that Miami could invest another second-rounder in Orton. Unless Stephen Ross is as obsessed with Vince Young as Bud Adams anyway.

Potential Suitors: Miami Dolphins, Arizona Cardinals
Best Bet
: The Fins. Orton's a better bet than either Vince Young or Matt Moore and, again, it's "just" a second-rounder.


Donovan McNabb
:
Which brings us to this guy. Poor Donovan hasn't had the easiest year in the world -- he's been mortified by Mike Shanhan and the Redskins coaching staff on national television (seriously: wouldn't you rather get pansted in DuPont Circle than get yanked mid-game for Rex Grossman?) and basically been castoff into free-agent oblivion.

There's even been talk of retirement. But the talk today has circled primarily around the Vikings. Which -- of course -- is where McNabb was supposed to go all along.

There was no deal finalized on Tuesday and/or even agreed to, but it's looking like Minnesota will bring in McNabb to try and provide a stabilizing veteran presence on the roster.

Christian Ponder's obviously the future, and I agree with my life coach Pete Prisco that he's the best-suited rookie quarterback to succeed from Day 1.

But that doesn't mean rookie coach Leslie Frazier shouldn't have a backup option in place should he find out that Ponder's not ready quite yet.

Plus, the two teams play on Christmas Eve, man. And that's something that just has to happen in terms of potential revenge games that may or may not feature McNabb running over Ponder's foot the week of the game just to get the start.

For all of that to even happen, though, McNabb's going to need to agree to work out a significant change in his contract. But if it gets him out of purgatory Washington, it's worth the lost money.

Potential Suitors: Minnesota Vikings
Best Bet: Vikings. It just doesn't seem likely that the Titans or Dolphins will step up and trade for McNabb. If he's released by Washington, this could all change but for now the Vikings appear to be the clear-cut leader in the clubhouse when it comes to Donovan's services.

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Posted on: July 22, 2011 3:20 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 3:48 pm
 

Is Jackson in, Hasselbeck out for Seahawks?

Posted by Ryan Wilson

There may still be NFL labor uncertainty, but one thing is not in doubt: once the lockout ends, free agency will be a frenzied process as the league furiously preps for the 2011 season.

And from the sound of it, longtime Seahawks quarterback Matt Hasselbeck won't be back in Seattle. ESPN's John Clayton doesn't think the Seahawks are interested in paying a starter's salary to a 35-year-old oft-injured QB whose future might be as a backup and mentor.

"I don't know if they'll pay $5 million (per year), I don't know if they'll pay $6 million," Clayton said, according to ESPN 710, "but if there's no offer from Seattle, you take the best offer and it very well could be in Nashville."

As in: the Titans, a destination we wrote about last month. And while we'd expect there will be a market for Hasselbeck, especially to help bring along a young franchise quarterback like, say, Jake Locker, it's something of a surprise to hear that the Seahawks could be keen on Tarvaris Jackson, the former Vikings second-round pick who will be a free agent once the lockout ends.

Clayton says he's "getting the feeling" that Seattle could have serious interest in Jackson. ESPN analyst and former NFL quarterback Trent Dilfer also suggested that Jackson could land in Seattle, telling ESPN 710 that, "(Seahawks new offensive coordinator Darrell) Bevell … always had an affinity for Tarvaris Jackson. And believe it or not, I think that might be the play here for the Seattle Seahawks -- I think it might be trying to get Tarvaris Jackson from Minnesota. … They've always liked him, they liked his starter potential. (Bevell) tried to make it happen for him in Minnesota and that might be the direction they're trying to go."

Dilfer add that "I don't like that plan, but if that's their plan and that's what they're trying to do, then more power to them."

In an interview with the Seattle Times, Jackson admits that he worked well with Bevell in the past. 

"We had a pretty good relationship, me and Bev did," Jackson said. "... It seems like a pretty good opportunity. I know the offense. That's a plus. Coach Bevell, he's very familiar with me and I'm very familiar with him. So that's always a plus."

We've written previously that the Seahawks, rumored to have offered a first- and third-round pick for Kevin Kolb earlier this offseason, shouldn't break the bank for an unproven commodity given all their other roster needs. Jackson, like Kolb, is still unproven, but he wouldn't cost nearly as much. And unlike Matt Leinart, who has ties to Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll that go back to USC, Jackson doesn't come with baggage.

Worst case: instead of reaching or overspending for a stopgap QB, Seattle just goes with what they have -- Charlie Whitehurst -- and reevaluate things after the season.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com