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Tag:NFL Supplemental Draft
Posted on: June 22, 2011 9:49 pm
 

Watch Terrelle Pryor throw passes to NFL WRs

Posted by Ryan Wilson

It's been eight days since Terrelle Pryor's agent, Drew Rosenhaus, convened a press conference to let everyone know that he expect his client to be a "first-round pick" in the NFL's supplemental draft. It was the first of many PR sleights of hand by Rosenhaus to manufacture interest in Pryor who, by most accounts isn't worth more than a fourth-round pick.

But sometimes perceptions trump reality and when Rosenhaus is writing the script and working the stage lights it's hard to tell where make-believe ends and the truth begins. As NFL Network's Mike Mayock said last week: "Nobody is better than Rosenhaus in driving perceived value. … Sometimes perceived value is almost as good as real value if he can get enough people talking about [Pryor] as a first-round pick."

On Monday, ESPN's Jon Gruden was in Florida to tape a very special "QB Camp" episode featuring Pryor. In an excerpted clip Gruden asks Pryor about the whole "So, what in the world happened at Ohio State?" situation that prompted Pryor to leave school earlier this month.

The show airs in its entirety next week, and perhaps in an effort to lessen the blow of any missteps with Gruden (either on the field on in the classroom), Rosenhaus has released a 75-second video of Pryor working out. He's seen throwing passes to Chad Ochocinco and Antonio Brown who both happen to be represented by Rosenhaus. (Now we're just waiting for Brown to offer unsolicited praise for Pryor's quarterbacking skills.)

As PFT's Michael David Smith notes, "Obviously, Rosenhaus isn’t going to let footage of Pryor’s bad throws get out, so the video that’s been released won’t tell us a whole lot. But it’s still interesting to see how Pryor looks when dropping back and throwing to NFL receivers."



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Posted on: June 20, 2011 7:32 pm
Edited on: June 20, 2011 7:53 pm
 

Gruden, Pryor film new 'QB Camp' segment for ESPN

Posted by Ryan Wilson

Another day, another Terrelle Pryor post. Yes, we know, he's just 12 days removed from college and this is an NFL blog. Welcome to June in the middle of a lockout.

Anyway, TampaBay.com's Greg Auman writes that former Bucaneers coach-turned-ESPN analyst Jon Gruden has a new contestant for his QB Camp television spectacle that originally ran in the weeks leading up to the 2011 NFL Draft. You guessed it: it's Pryor, who said in a press conference last week that he's entering the supplemental draft. (And as you've probably heard, Pryor's agent, Drew Rosenhaus, expects his client to be a "first-round pick.")

According to Auman, "Pryor said he spent six hours Monday morning watching and breaking down video with Gruden -- a major part of the ESPN show -- and said the chance to work with the former Bucs coach was a great opportunity."

In previous pre-draft episodes, Gruden hosted Cam Newton, Andy Dalton, Ryan Mallett and Jake Locker (details here).

After Monday's session Pryor said, "There's too much to learn from [Gruden]. I enjoyed the time … He's a great coach and a great mentor. I'm just trying to get better."

Auman adds that Rosenhaus has instructed Pryor not to talk to the media about his draft preparations, although Pryor admitted that he was returning to Miami because "I've got some training to do."

In April, before the Buckeye's football program was beset by scandal, Gruden spoke at the Ohio State coaches clinic. It's where he first met Pryor. And when Gruden was asked if he thought Pryor was an NFL prospect, he said, "Yeah, I do -- I really do," Columbus Dispatch reported. "Again, I'm accused of liking too many people. 'Gruden likes everybody.' Well, sorry about that. (But) Bill Walsh used to say, 'Don't tell me what this guy can't do. Tell me what he can do."

That said, even Glass-Half-Full Gruden qualified his laudatory remarks.

"...Terrelle Pryor can run and he can throw," he said at the time. "And he's a helluva competitor. And if I coached him, I'd find something for him to do. You might have to cater your offense to a degree towards his strengths. But I think this guy can develop his passing the more you pass the ball. And I think the guy is a unique, rare talent."

This very special episode of QB Camp will air Thursday, June 30, at 9 p.m. EST on ESPN.

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Posted on: June 9, 2011 1:02 pm
Edited on: June 9, 2011 2:08 pm
 

Terrelle Pryor's NFL future looks dim

Posted by Ryan Wilson

It's been a tough few weeks for Ohio State football. Head coach Jim Tressel resigned amid allegations of wrongdoing, and shortly thereafter quarterback Terrelle Pryor left school, presumably to avoid further NCAA sanctions.

It wasn't long after Tressel's departure that we started hearing he could coach again, maybe even in the NFL. Pryor, on the other hand, doesn't appear to have many professional options. At least ones that include making a living playing football.

It's unclear what Pryor's next move will be, but the NFL's supplemental draft is one possibility. The allure of millions is tempting, but here's to hoping someone in Pryor's camp is living in reality. Because if the early reports are any indication, Pryor's not considered much of a quarterback prospect, and at least one NFL front-office type had doubts about Pryor's character.

“We spent a lot of time this year going through Cam Newton (notes) and Ryan Mallett’s (notes) personality,” an NFC general manager told Yahoo.com's Jason Cole. “I haven’t done all my homework on Pryor yet, but my initial impression is that if you line all three of them up and just talked about trust and reliability, Pryor is dead last. Like not-even-out-of-the-starting-gate last. And it’s probably only going to get worse.”.

Doesn't leave much room for interpretation. Ryan Mallet was once considered a first-round talent but the dreaded "off-the-field concerns" saw him plummet to Round 3 before Bill Belichick and the Patriots took a flyer on him.

An NFL coach echoed many of the same worries. “The more you read about this guy with the cars and the tattoos and money and all that other stuff … Look, we all know how the college game works and what those [coaches] have to deal with, but this kid sounds like he didn’t give a damn about anybody. He was just there for himself. He didn’t even try to hide it. He flaunted it. If you’re like that, it’s hard to be a quarterback.”

There are a lot of places on an NFL team that you can hide character flaws and personality defects. Terrell Owens has made a handsome living despite his notoriously divisive locker room presence. Antonio Cromartie has at least nine kids by eight women, and isn't much on tackling, but he played without incident for the Jets last year.

Teams don't have such luxuries at quarterback. It's the one position you can ill-afford to have a mental case -- or worse: a flake. And we haven't even gotten into Pryor's physical shortcomings as a quarterback. “I’ve viewed him as a wide receiver prospect more than a quarterback prospect,” ESPN's Todd McShay said on a conference call. “I think he’s so far off in terms of decision-making, being comfortable in the pocket, being able to go through the progression reads, with his mechanics and consistent accuracy from where you need to be as a quarterback." McShay's colleague Mel Kiper thinks Pryor's path to the NFL is as a tight end.

Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow faced similar questions about his ability when he was at Florida. The difference: his character was unimpeachable and his leadership skills were indisputable.

Still, Pryor has alternatives to the supplemental draft, which is currently on hold because of the labor situation. As CBSSports.com's Josh Katzowitz wrote Tuesday, Pryor could transfer to another FBS school and have to sit out a year, transfer to an FCS (or lower) school and play immediately, or hone his talents in the CFL or UFL.

But unless Pryor undergoes a complete transformation -- both between the ears and in terms of physical talents -- his NFL future looks decidedly dim.

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Posted on: June 7, 2011 6:20 pm
Edited on: June 7, 2011 10:18 pm
 

Pryor done at OSU; NFL supplemental draft next?

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

By now, you might have heard a little story about the lawyer for Ohio State QB Terrelle Pryor announcing that Pryor won’t return to the Buckeyes ever again.

And assuming Pryor is not going to transfer to another FBS school and have to sit out a year before resuming his final season of eligibility (minus the five games he’s suspended, of course), transfer to a Division II or III school and NOT sit out a year but play inferior competition, or take his talents to the CFL or UFL (a lot of assumptions, I know), he very well could end up in this year’s NFL supplemental draft.

Assuming, of course, there actually IS a supplemental draft.

Larry James, Pryor’s lawyer, told the Cleveland Plain Dealer that Pryor hasn’t decided whether he’ll enter the supplemental draft and that he actually might spend his senior year finishing up his classes to graduate.

While that latter option seems laughable -- even if there is no supplemental draft, why wouldn’t he play professionally somewhere? -- Pryor isn’t likely to be a top pick in the supplemental draft.

The Plain Dealer speculated he’d be a mid-round pick, and that sounds about right to me, simply because Pryor hasn’t been as good as advertised and because he's raw as a pro talent. But there doesn’t seem to be much doubt that SOMEBODY would look at Pryor’s athleticism and talent and find a way to squeeze him onto a roster.

And for now, that’s probably his best bet.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com