Tag:Peyton Manning
Posted on: August 30, 2010 11:04 am
Edited on: August 30, 2010 11:05 am
 

Manning, Polian detest new ball-spotting rules

Posted by Andy Benoit

Not surprisingly, Peyton Manning and Bill Polian are displeased -- perhaps even downright angry -- with the NFL’s new ball-spotting rule. Because umpires are now lining up in the backfield, it’s taking longer for them to spot the ball. And, after they spot the ball, they must run back to their spot some 10 yards behind the line of scrimmage. Consequently, the quarterback must look to the line judge to get a go-ahead to snap the ball. As we saw at Lambeau Field last Thursday night, this slows Indy’s hurry-up offense. B. Polian (US Presswire)

As usual, Sports Illustrated’s Peter King, in his most recent Monday Morning Quarterback Column, got great insight on the mess. Manning told King, "If we had this rule last year there's no way we catch up in that New England game. We were down, what, 21 points in the fourth quarter? We wouldn't have had enough time to run enough plays to catch up. But forget about that game. Let's chart all the comeback wins where a team runs the hurry-up in the fourth quarter. How many of those games would have ended up the same way -- or would the quarterbacks have had enough time to run enough plays to come back and win?''

Indy’s gripe also pertains to the snap infringement penalty (which they were flagged for twice against Green Bay). "I am dead-set against the penalty,'' Polian, who is on the Competition Committee, said. "It is insane. If I knew it would be this way, I'd have voted against it, and not only that, I'd have crusaded against it.''

It is believed that the NFL will try to fix the timing issues, though VP of officiating, Carl Johnson, doesn’t seem too creative at this point.

"The way the new mechanic of the umpire positioning is, I don't have a resolution to that,'' Johnson told King. "It's going to take a couple extra seconds to spot the ball. There's no way around that. But this is a work in progress. We're aggressively seeking ways to improve the mechanics.''

King bounces around several ideas for what the league can do to remedy the problem. A major obstacle is that the league has already acknowledged that the umpire was moved because of safety concerns. This significantly limits the possibility of simply moving the umpires back to his original spot. After all, if that were to happen, then not only would the league be saying it doesn’t care about the umpire’s safety, but it could also be liable if an umpire were to get seriously injured.

It’s safe to assume that when the apparently hasty decision to relocate the umpire was made, the NFL did not foresee having to deal with so many issues this close to the start of the regular season.

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Posted on: August 28, 2010 9:28 am
 

Hot Routes 8.28.10: Good News, Bad News

Posted by Will Brinson

Got a link for the Hot Routes? Follow us on Twitter (@CBSSportsNFL) or send an email to will [dot] brinson [at] cbsinteractive [dot] com.

Fellow Blogger Fantasy Football League member (and Football Outsiders overlord as well as a really swell guy) Aaron Schatz got the hook-up from the NFL to show the official video of the NFL's rule changes . Check it.

Just how important is DeSean Jackson to the Eagles? Well, as the Eagletarian mentions , the offense went to a pile of mess when Jackson left with injury, so that should be a good clue. Of course, maybe it was just Kansas City's, um, vaunted defense? Not good times.

The Finsider points out that it's "good news-bad news" re: the Dolphins starting cornerbacks. Vontae Davis was "outstanding" while Jason Allen "proved … he is not an NFL starting cornerback." Harsh words, but it's important, especially if you're one of those idiots who picked the Dolphins to finish ahead of the Jets in the AFC East. /raises hand

One of my favorite interwebs spots, Cat Scratch Reader, notes that the third preseason game enerally provides a good indication as to how well the Panthers will do in the coming season.

The Rams have to be pleased with everything outside of the loss of Donnie Avery -- Turf Show Times says that the play of Jason Smith and Roger Saffold, for different reasons, is also encouraging, particularly in relation to how the combination of "Sam Bradford + Saffold" >>>>> "Russell Okung + Jimmy Clausen." Or something.

Some mildly tangential football news, in that Dan Steinberg discusses where Stephen Strasburg's injury stacks up against the all-time worst for DC Sports -- the chief comparison is that of Joe Theismann when Lawrence Taylor wrecked his life and forced us into bad football broadcasting and, eventually, a crappy movie rendition of a great Michael Lewis book.

Well, well, la-ti-da. Doesn't Chicago just have sooooo many trophies from professional sports teams ? Actually, as the only town to own all four major trophies over the past 25 years, all the owners got together and had a big party where they made fun of the Cubs and then cracked jokes about whether or not anyone would bother hiring Lovie Smith next season.

Our old pal SbB brings to light information that should totally remind everyone in Los Angeles: UR NOT GETTIN' OUR SOUTHERN FOOTBALL. Actually, Brooks ends the post optimistically, but let me tell you what, if they take football from Jacksonville, Thanksgivings are going to be REALLY awkward for my family. No offense, cousins and such.

Zerkle's rundown of Peyton Manning's issues with the umpire is worth it if only for the Madden '11 photoshop.

Haters gonna hate all they want, but Gregg Rosenthal still managed to work up a positive piece about LaDainian Tomlinson at PFT. It's logical too, because, well, as much we all suddenly want LdT to fail miserably, the good news is that he's not as awful as Willie Parker. Careers fade fast when you're from Clinton, NC, son.
Posted on: August 27, 2010 11:09 am
Edited on: August 27, 2010 11:11 am
 

New umpire positioning proving to be a problem

Posted by Andy Benoit

The Colts-Packers gave fans rare first-class preseason entertainment Thursday night, but what ardent football buffs took away from the game was just how disruptive the new umpiring position can be.

By now, you’ve probably had it explained to you 9 or 10 times that the NFL has decided to relocate the umpire from the linebacking area to the backfield. The main reason behind the move was umpire safety (there were 100 collisions and three injuries to umpires in 2009).

So far this preseason, the popular thing for television analysts to explain is that this relocation will lead to more offensive holding calls.
(This, by the way, will probably prove untrue before long; penalties always increase with rule changes, but ultimately, players adjust.)
NFL Umpire (US Presswire)
In ESPN’s Packers-Colts telecast, Ron Jaworski and Jon Gruden remonstrated about how the umpire’s new positioning slows down the flow of play. The umpire must spot the ball and then run 10 yards behind the line of scrimmage. The offense is not allowed to snap the ball until the umpire and referee are both deeper than the deepest back. This means a one- to two-second delay, which, in hurry-up time, is an eternity.

Because of this, the NFL decided that umpires will remain in their old linebacker position inside of two minutes. But this doesn’t help a team like the Colts, who run a hurry-up outside of two minutes. Indeed, Indy was flagged for two false snaps Thursday night. They were held up on several more snaps, with Peyton Manning constantly having to look to his left to get the side judge’s approval to snap the ball. As Jaws and Gruden stressed, this forces a quarterback to take his eyes off the defense, which goes against everything he’s taught.

Colts president Bill Polian is very powerful within the NFL (he’s on the Competition Committee). You can bet he’s going to ask (demand) that the league re-examine the execution of the umpire’s new positioning.

Gruden correctly pointed out that the difference in the flow of the hurry-up outside of two minutes and inside of two minutes was startling. Jaws suggested that, instead of worrying so much about the umpire’s safety, the league should find more athletic umpires and give them helmets. It’s not a bad idea when you consider that doing so would force only one person to make a drastic change (the umpire) rather than an entire offense to make a drastic change.

The NFL seems hesitant to make major changes, though. In an e-mail sent to ESPN’s Paul Kuharsky, NFL spokesman Michael Signora said, "The movement of the umpire to the offensive backfield will happen in the regular-season. We continue to analyze and review the impact of the change in the preseason, and we may announce some tweaks to the mechanics of the position prior to the regular season, but the move is a definite."

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Posted on: August 27, 2010 12:11 am
 

Addai suffers concussion in preseason game

Posted by Will Brinson

Joseph Addai, who ripped off a 49-yard run on Indianapolis' first play from scrimmage, suffered a concussion in the third quarter of Thursday night's preseason game against the Packers.

Addai chased down Robert Francois after the Packers' defender recovered a Peyton Manning fumble and, while tackling Francois at the Colts' 2-yard-line, "came down hard."

He then spent a few minutes on the sideline with his head covered by a towel and speaking with trainers.

The oddest part about the injury is that the Colts, who aren't exactly known for leaving their starters in for lengthy periods of time (ahem, 2009 regular season), kept he, Manning and other starters in past halftime.
Posted on: August 26, 2010 10:01 pm
 

QBs blowing up on Thursday night, Avery hurt

Posted by Will Brinson

We tweeted earlier wondering who would have the best numbers between Aaron Rodgers and Peyton Manning.

Rodgers won the battle (but not by much), throwing up a monster first half line, going 21/29 with 195 yards and 3 TDs. Manning wasn't exactly bad though, going 13/23 with 199 yards, 2 TDs and an interception.

Elsewhere (well, in New England, actually), Tom Brady and Sam Bradford are having a decent little night of their own.

Brady went 10/12 for 175 yards and 2 TDs including a 65-yard bomb to Randy Moss; Brady also "lost" a series when Brandon Tate took the opening kickoff 97 yards to the house.

Bradford, in what amounts to an audition for the Rams' starting job, looked superb while going 15/22 for 189 yards and 2 TDs. (Of course, ex-Duke guy Thaddeus Lewis had, as of this writing, ripped the Pats for 74 yards and a TD, so maybe it's a defensive thing.)

Bad news hit for the Rams, though, when Donnie Avery left on a cart after a nasty knee injury.

We'll keep you updated on that as we find out more.
Posted on: August 17, 2010 11:54 am
 

AFC South Preview, Podcast Style

Posted by Will Brinson

It's podcast time once again, people -- with only a few weeks remaining until real football starts, we cruise down (?) to the AFC South to talk preview.

And today we welcome on the always fantastic Steph Stradley of FanHouse and Houston Chronicle fame to talk about what might arguably* be the toughest division in the NFL.

The first thing we want to know: Is it the Texans year? (Second thing: Can we talk about the Texans and Matt Schaub's "power alleys" enough to jinx them?) Also, are the Colts even worth talking about beyond Peyton Manning? Can Chris Johnson hit 2,500 yards with the Titans? And will the Jaguars ever find a true identity?

That's, right: all that and more, all for the low, low price of clicking a play button. Got a question you want answered on the show? Hit us up on Twitter (@CBSSportsNFL ) or email will [dot] brinson [at] cbs [dot] com .

Oh, and also, be a friend and subscribe either by RSS or iTunes below.

If you can't view the podcast, click here to download .
Or, make it easy on yourself and  Subscribe via iTunes .


*This is a reasonable argument for any division except the AFC or NFC West.
Posted on: August 16, 2010 10:23 am
 

Brady: 'I'd love to be here my whole career'

Posted by Will Brinson

Tom Brady joins the Dennis and Callahan show on WEEI every Monday morning to talk Patriots football. Today, even though he's in the midst of an awkward contract situation, has a thumb injury and apparently can't get an appointment to have his haircut, he swung by. And things got interesting -- not in the sense that anything awkward was asked, but Brady was pretty darn quotable.

Brady confirmed the golf outing with Bob Kraft; he pointed out that he and Kraft hadn't spoken much in the last six or seven months and that with his wife out of town, he figured he'd take him up on the outing, since they hadn't spoken much in six or seven months. Then the topic turned to whether Brady could spend his entire career in New England.

"I’d love to be here my whole career," Brady responded. "I have goals and the team has goals and hopefully they’re down the same line. But you never know. Like I said, Joe Montana got traded, and Jerry Rice did, guys I loved watching out there that really were the best players to ever play at their positions. It’s hard to think if those guys are not playing for a team, wow, why should I ever be excluded from that?"

The WEEI guys followed up by asking whether or not Brady had a timeline on when he wanted to get a new deal done; the obvious thought process is "ASAP" considering that Brady managed to bang up his finger during the first preseason game of the year. Brady, however, played the typical role of team player.

"What I want, it doesn't matter," Brady pointed out. "I'm not going to be really attached to that, because it's not up to me. There are a lot of people involved. Every player on the team wants a contact to be fairly compensated. So does Logan [Mankins], so did Vince [Wilfork] last year. So do all the other guys ... so does Wes [Welker]. Wes doesn't make a lot of money, but he's one of the best receivers in the league. We all want to be compensated fairly, but we also understand we signed contracts so that's why we're here to show up and give our best."

Brady also discussed Peyton Manning's impending contract extension and whether or not it mattered to him how much Manning makes versus his contract -- they actually framed it with "who should make $1 more?" -- but Brady didn't bite.

"I know what he’s gonna make, he’s gonna make a lot and he deserves it," Brady said. "He’s one of best to ever play. You know, honestly, it’s not about that. When it’s all said and done, I’m not gonna sit and worry about who made more money. All these other quarterbacks in the league and what they make, I don’t care what they get. Whatever works for me and the team, that’s what it’ll be. I don’t really care who makes more."

Those are nice answers and the entire interview is pretty good. But also pretty typical of Brady, who's the consummate team player. Of course, if you presume that the two sides are in the midst of negotiations right now, it wouldn't exactly behoove Brady to come out and bash the team for taking their sweet time to ink him to an extension.

Don't be surprised if you see this deal happen soon.

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Posted on: August 16, 2010 9:31 am
Edited on: August 16, 2010 11:46 am
 

Hot Routes 8.16.10: Media wants Tebow's autograph

Posted by Will Brinson



Got a link we should feature in the Hot Routes? Follow us on Twitter (@CBSSportsNFL) or email will [dot] brinson [at] cbs [dot] com .
  • Unsurprisingly, the comments on my "Tebow was impressive" article were all like "WHAT GAME DID YOU WATCH?!? HE PLAYED AGAINST SECOND- AND THIRD-STRINGERS!" That's true. But you know what? Tebow is so freaking amazing that he's inspiring media members to ask him for autographs -- according to Alex Marvez on Twitter , two members of the press walked up to Tebow after the game and asked for his signature. That's a big no-no (doi), because not only do you immediately shred any sense of objectivity about the person you're covering, but it's a clear-cut case of abusing the access that press members have. Next thing you know, they'll start serving us delicious food at games too! No, but seriously, this is embarrassing; a quick Twitter-poll reveals that most people agree what they did was quite annoying, etc.
  • Of course, all the Tebow love in the world won't change the top spot on the Broncos' depth chart -- Dave Krieger of the Denver Post writes that "it's not close" when it comes to how far ahead Kyle Orton is. That's true, but as a I mentioned last night, it would be somewhat surprising if Tebow didn't hop Brady Quinn for the No. 2 spot in Denver.
  • There were three No. 1 overall quarterbacks involved in the San Francisco - Indy tilt, with David Carr, Peyton Manning and Alex Smith all getting action during the game. That may be a fact that interests only me. (And it only interests me because I have a weird obsession with Carr, aka "Mister Mittens." )
  • Manish Mehta of the New York Daily News has a handy "10 things to watch" list for the Jets preseason opener. You'll never believe it, but a Darrelle Revis-less defense's play is near the top. On a fairly random note, my girlfriend (who does NOT care for football) watched "Hard Knocks" and freaking loved it. Downside: she asked if it was okay to cheer for the Jets in 2010. I begrudgingly said yes.
  • Kent Somers notes that Larry Fitzgerald -- he of the recently sprained MCL -- was prepping to have his best season ever as a pro and wants people to not "write him off." Geez, Larry. That's a lot to ask. From what I hear, he's going undrafted in almost every fantasy league after this injury.
  • Chicago Breaking Sports has video of Jay Cutler stating that the Bears were just "a few blocks away from some big runs." Yeah, and I'm just "a few hundred thousand dollars away from being a millionaire." (10 to be exact.)

 
 
 
 
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