Play Fantasy The Most Award Winning Fantasy game with real time scoring, top expert analysis, custom settings, and more. Play Now
 
Tag:Josh katzowitz
Posted on: March 3, 2012 6:35 pm
 

Giants great Alex Webster dies at 80

Alex Webster, a NYG great, coached the team from 1969-73. (US Presswire)
By Josh Katzowitz

Alex “Red” Webster, one of the top rushers in Giants history who also served as the team’s coach from 1969-73, died at the age of 80 on Saturday morning, according to TCPalm.com.

Webster, who was inducted into the Giants Ring of Honor this past year and who was a two-time Pro Bowler, played in New York from 1955-64, recording 4,638 yards and 39 touchdowns. He also caught 240 passes for 17 more scores.

Webster was fourth on the club’s all-time rushing list, but Brandon Jacobs passed him this season.

"He was a very gracious gentleman, a very honorable and proud man," John Miller, the general manager of the senior home in which Webster lived in Port St. Lucie, Fla., told the website. "I considered him a great friend. Considering his background and everything that he accomplished, he was very unassuming.”

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, Like Us on Facebook, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: March 3, 2012 3:46 pm
Edited on: March 3, 2012 6:11 pm
 

Loomis confirms Saints have tagged Drew Brees

Brees reportedly won't be happy if he gets tagged. (Getty Images)
By Josh Katzowitz

The Saints contract dispute with quarterback Drew Brees could continue on for a while now, as New Orleans general manager Mickey Loomis confirmed, via CBSSports.com's Larry Holder, that New Orleans has placed the franchise tag on its franchise player.

This news, originally reported by Fox Sports’ Jay Glazer, comes as a bit of a surprise, simply because the potential of the tag upsetting Brees is so high and because common sense told us that eventually the two sides would come to an agreement. But if the organization has tagged Brees, the two sides must have been far apart in their contract negotiations.

New Orleans' forgettable offseason
Like, I don’t know, $5 million a year apart, as CBSSports.com’s Ryan Wilson told us the other day?

All is not lost, though, because the team and Brees have until July 16 to work out a long-term deal that would erase him having to play under the tag (if not, Brees will make about $15 million for 2012, because it's an exclusive tag, meaning he can't talk to other teams).

Otherwise, if they can’t come to an agreement, could this spell Brees’ potential departure from New Orleans after the 2012 seasno?

As CBSSports.com’s Mike Freeman opined, "What the hell are the Saints doing? I've said this before. There are certain players, only a handful, where you open the vault and roll out the cash. You give them a blank check. Brees is one of those players. Franchising Brees is going to anger him, no question. Players despise the tag because it limits their earning potential. So you've ticked off your best player. For what? Why?"

Of course, the Saints role as the bad guy was diminished a bit Friday (ahem, before the Saints role as the bad guy REALLY increased) by Larry Holder’s report that the Saints actually offered to make Brees the highest-paid player in the NFL but that Brees and his agent, Tom Condon, had turned down New Orleans.

Which didn't shock CBSSports.com's Pete Prisco, who wrote, "Let's get off this Brees-is-the-savior of New Orleans talk while we're at it. If this negotiation has taught us anything, it's that all players -- no matter what image they portray -- are in it for themselves.
Never forget that."

While tagging Brees would be bad for the Saints and for Brees, guard Carl Nicks is likely ecstatic by this latest news.

And that's really the other tough part for the franchise. Having to use its tag on Brees means the Saints likely will lose top-notch guard Carl Nicks and very well could have to say goodbye to receiver Marques Colston. Two more reasons why nobody in New Orleans should be happy with this development.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, Like Us on Facebook, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: March 3, 2012 2:21 pm
Edited on: March 3, 2012 2:22 pm
 

Report: NFL will investigate 'Skins for bounty

By Josh Katzowitz

Former Redskins coach Joe Gibbs says he didn’t know his defensive coordinator, Gregg Williams, might have put together a bounty program in Washington before he did the same thing with the Saints, but it sounds like the NFL now will look into what transpired in Washington during Williams’ time there.

That’s what the Washington Post is reporting, citing an anonymous source who says it is standard for the league to investigate accusations that rules have been broken.

New Orleans' forgettable offseason

At this point, it seems fairly clear that there was a bounty program in Washington, especially if you read former Redskins player Matt Bowen’s piece today in the Chicago Tribune in which he writes:

“That's right. We got paid for big hits, clean hits by the rule book. … Money jumped in the playoffs. A bigger stage equaled more coin. Instead of a few hundred dollars, now you got a thousand, maybe more, depending on the player. That's the truth. I can't sugarcoat this. It was a system we all bought into.”

Gibbs told the Post on Friday, “In my life … I wouldn’t ever tell a player to hurt somebody.

“They may say, ‘Well, Joe would know, because everybody else knew.’ But I didn’t know. I’m shocked by this.”

With the NFL investigating, we should have a better idea of who know what and when they knew it.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, Like Us on Facebook, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: March 3, 2012 11:23 am
 

Gibbs says he didn't know about 'Skins bounty

Joe Gibbs, right, claims not to know that Gregg Williams might have had a bounty program in Washington. (US Presswire)
By Josh Katzowitz

We can discuss what Saints coach Sean Payton knew or didn’t know about the bounty brought about by his team and defensive coordinator Gregg Williams -- and the NFL says he knew about it at some point in the investigation process but did nothing to stop it. But former Redskins coach Joe Gibbs can tell you exactly what he knew when he employed Williams.

In three words: Gibbs knew nothing.

That’s what he told the Washington Post in the wake of what could be one of the nastiest scandals in NFL history.

“Just let me say this: I’m not aware of anything like this when I was coaching there,” Gibbs told the Post in a phone interview. “I would never ask a player to hurt another player. Never.”

Williams worked with Gibbs for three years as the Washington defensive coordinator from 2004-07 (that’s in the time frame Tony Dungy brought up Friday when the Redskins might have caused the beginning of Manning’s neck problems). For the record, Williams also took a defense that was ranked 31st in the league the year before he got there and turned it into a top-10 unit.

In his apology, Williams didn’t mention his time with the Redskins, but the team also apparently had a bounty program when Williams was there.

New Orleans' forgettable offseason
And though Gibbs claims not to have known about it, the reports say the program was widely known throughout the organization.

“But I didn’t,” Gibbs said. “In my life … I wouldn’t ever tell a player to hurt somebody.

“They may say, ‘Well, Joe would know, because everybody else knew.’ But I didn’t know. I’m shocked by this.”

While it is hard to believe, like Payton, Gibbs didn’t know anything about the bounty program, but unless there’s absolute proof that disputes his spoken word, I suppose there’s not much reason not to give him the benefit of the doubt.

In other Williams-bounty-in-Washington news, here’s an interesting piece by Matt Bowen in the Chicago Tribune talking about his time with the Redskins playing for Williams and how the bounty system worked.

“I wanted to be That Guy for him, playing the game with an attitude opposing players absolutely feared,” Bowen writes. “If that meant playing through the whistle or going low on a tackle, I did it.

“I don't regret any part of it. I can't. Williams is the best coach I ever played for in my years in the NFL, a true teacher who developed me as a player. I believed in him. I still do. That will never change.”

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, Like Us on Facebook, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: March 3, 2012 9:18 am
Edited on: March 3, 2012 10:20 am
 

Manning workout video may belie surgery reports

By Josh Katzowitz

Peyton Manning is apparently throwing, and if the below video is any indication, he looks pretty decent while doing so.

If you love discussing possible conspiracy theories and trying to break down Zapruder-like film, the video below apparently shows Manning working out at Duke University on Friday and throwing the ball all over the field.

While this isn't the first report we've had of Manning actually throwing to receivers -- he did so at the end of last season in post-practice sessions with nobody but team officials around -- this is the first time the outside world has actually seen.

It looks like it’s shot with a camera phone so the video is very vertical, and it’s way too far away to confirm that it’s actually Manning (if you like confirming something by looking at a person’s face). It also appears that the person shooting this is hiding behind some kind of structure while taping so he can’t be seen.*

Latest news at Peyton's place
*Of course, that only adds to the conspiracy theory? Was this unauthorized video? Or is this supposed to look like unauthorized video that the Manning camp wanted in the public domain? Also, why was Manning practicing at Duke? Well, it’s because his former offensive coordinator at Tennessee, David Cutcliffe, is now the Blue Devils head coach. See, aren’t conspiracies fun?

But the motion, the drop-back, the footwork? It looks like Manning.

And from this video, Manning, in shoulder pads and a helmet, looks pretty good, bad neck and all.

So, what are we thinking? Is it Manning? Does he look good? Is this enough to change your opinion that Manning actually can play in 2012? More importantly, is it enough to convince the rest of the NFL that he’s ready to play?

According to ESPN’s Chris Mortensen, the player in the video is indeed Manning and that Manning has been seen around the Durham, N.C., area. Colts receiver Austin Collie and tight end Dallas Clark also apparently are working with Manning at Duke.

This video would fly in the face of the recent report that stated Manning might need a fourth surgery on his neck, including another potential spinal fusion.

But all of this goes to show, like with most conspiracies, we just don’t know what is true and what isn’t. This video is just another piece in the puzzle nobody, at this point, can solve.



For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, Like Us on Facebook, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: March 2, 2012 3:30 pm
Edited on: March 2, 2012 4:10 pm
 

NFL: N.O. had bounty program to injure opponents

According to the NFL, New Orleans coach Sean Payton didn't try to stop the bounty program, while owner Tom Benson, center, did try but ultimately failed.  (US Presswire)
By Josh Katzowitz

In a stunning announcement, the NFL has released the news of an investigation into a team-wide bounty program in New Orleans in which at least one coach and about two dozen players conspired to intentionally hurt opponents and knock them out of the game for money.

Between 22 and 27 players, and at least one assistant coach maintained this “pay for performance” bounty program, violating league rules in 2009, 2010 and 2011.

And the knowledge of the program reaches all the way into the owners box. Saints owner Tom Benson -- who was cited by the league as giving his “immediate and full cooperation to investigators” -- told general manager Mickey Loomis to end the program immediately when he became aware of it in 2011. According to the NFL, “the evidence showed that Mr. Loomis did not carry out Mr. Benson’s directions. Similarly, when the initial allegations were discussed with Mr. Loomis in 2010, he denied any knowledge of a bounty program and pledged that he would ensure that no such program was in place. There is no evidence that Mr. Loomis took any effective action to stop these practices.”

According to the NFL, the funds of the bounty pool -- to which players regularly contributed and which was administered by former defensive coordinator Gregg Williams, now with the Rams -- might have reached as high as $50,000 during the 2009 playoffs. If a player knocked out an opponent, they received $1,500. If an opponent had to be taken off on a cart, a player was paid $1,000. Those payouts could double or triple during the playoffs.

“Our investigation began in early 2010 when allegations were first made that Saints players had targeted opposing players, including Kurt Warner of the Cardinals and Brett Favre of the Vikings,” commissioner Roger Goodell said in a statement. “Our security department interviewed numerous players and other individuals. At the time, those interviewed denied that any such program existed and the player that made the allegation retracted his earlier assertions. As a result, the allegations could not be proven. We recently received significant and credible new information and the investigation was re-opened during the latter part of the 2011 season.” 

The NFL also found that coach Sean Payton was not a direct participant in the bounty program but that he didn’t make an attempt to learn about it or stop it when NFL investigators began asking about it.

Now, it’s up to Goodell to dole out the possible punishment. He has told the Saints that he will hold more proceedings and meet with the NFLPA and individual player leaders to discuss the appropriate discipline.

The league notes that “the discipline could include fines and suspensions and, in light of the competitive nature of the violation, forfeiture of draft choices. … Any appeal would be heard and decided by the commissioner.”

Said Goodell: “The payments here are particularly troubling because they involved not just payments for ‘performance,’ but also for injuring opposing players. The bounty rule promotes two key elements of NFL football: player safety and competitive integrity.

“It is our responsibility to protect player safety and the integrity of our game, and this type of conduct will not be tolerated. We have made significant progress in changing the culture with respect to player safety and we are not going to relent. We have more work to do and we will do it.”

Here's Benson's statement on the matter: "I have been made aware of the NFL's findings relative to the 'bounty rule' and how it relates to our club. I have offered and the NFL has received our full cooperation in their investigation. While the findings may be troubling, we look forward to putting this behind us and winning more championships in the future for our fans."

For what it's worth, here is one of the last attempts of Warner's career.



For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, Like Us on Facebook, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: March 2, 2012 1:24 pm
Edited on: March 2, 2012 1:35 pm
 

Perrish Cox not guilty of sexual assault charges

CoxBy Josh Katzowitz

Former Broncos cornerback Perrish Cox, on trial for two counts of sexual assault, has been found not guilty of both charges.

As the Denver Post reports, the jury deliberated four hours on Thursday and a little more than two hours Friday before making its conclusion that Cox was not guilty of sexual assault on a victim unable to assess her condition.

If he was convicted of the felonies, Cox could have faced life in prison. One charge required the state to prove Cox had sex with the woman and that she was "physically helpless and the actor knows the victim is physically helpless and the victim has not consented." The other count required the state to show Cox knew "that the victim [wa]s incapable of appraising the nature of the victim's conduct."

According to the AP, the alleged victim let out an audible sigh and a cry and said, "Oh my God, what's happening?" before rushing out of the courtroom.

Cox is a free agent and now is free to sign with any team.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, Like Us on Facebook, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: March 2, 2012 12:50 pm
Edited on: March 2, 2012 1:28 pm
 

Saints offered to make Brees highest-paid player

Did Brees really turn down Mickey Loomis' offer to make him the highest-paid NFL player? (US Presswire)
By Josh Katzowitz

With the report Thursday that the Saints and quarterback Drew Brees are $5 million per year apart on contract negotiations, CBSSports.com’s Larry Holder has the news that New Orleans offered Brees a contract before the 2011 season that would have made him the highest-paid player in the NFL and that Brees and his agent, Tom Condon, turned it down.

“He (general manager Mickey Loomis) offered Brees the highest paid contract in NFL history,” a source told Holder. “Does that not equate with great or elite?”

NFL News, Notes
In a Yahoo Sports report Thursday, Jason Cole cited multiple sources that said that Loomis was trying to devalue Brees by saying only he is a “very good” quarterback as opposed to a “great” one.

Cole also speculated that Saints owner Tom Benson might have to step into the negotiations to make sure both sides were satisfied with a new contract. New Orleans, of course, could franchise tag Brees, but Brees obviously wouldn’t be happy with that decision.

Plus, that would make it tougher for the team to keep guard Carl Nicks and receiver Marques Colston if the only way for the Saints to avoid sending Brees to free agency was to tag him.

As CBSSports.com’s Mike Freeman wrote, “What the hell are the Saints doing? I've said this before. There are certain players, only a handful, where you open the vault and roll out the cash. You give them a blank check. Brees is one of those players. Franchising Brees is going to anger him, no question. Players despise the tag because it limits their earning potential. So you've ticked off your best player. For what? Why?”

But now we have to wonder why Brees and Condon would turn down the richest deal in the league and what they expect to actually get in return for Brees playing.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, Like Us on Facebook, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com