Tag:Donovan mcNabb
Posted on: September 18, 2011 8:14 pm
Edited on: September 18, 2011 8:15 pm
 

'The NFL Today': Week 2 postgame show

Posted by Will Brinson

The NFL Today wraps up the week that was in the NFL -- postgame coverage right ... here:


And, just to recap, here's the news, notes and quotes from our award-winning team of analysts during the pre-kickoff show.

Shannon Sharpe on Tim Tebow playing any time soon:
"There might come a time at some point in time during the season that might happen. Talking to John Elway and John Fox, I don't see that happening any time soon. I think he might be able to be successful but you'd have to scrap your entire offense to make this guy successful. Then what happens, if he gets nicked and somebody else has to come in because you have nobody else on this team with his skill set. Everyone talks about his intangibles, his big heart, his desire to win, he won the Heisman. Arguably, one of the five or six greatest college players to ever play the game. But what about accuracy? That's an intangible you must have to be successful at any level to play quarterback, especially in the National Football League. I just don't see how this guy can be successful consistently when he can't throw the football accurately."

Boomer Esiason on the Jets throwing the ball more:
"Ground and pound got him to two AFC championship games, I get it. And they were protecting a young quarterback who was a liability as opposed to an asset. Now he's a third year starter. He's a captain. He's wearing the "C." I get they have a little problem protecting him. Wayne Hunter had all he could handle last week from DeMarcus Ware. You got Santonio Holmes, Plaxico Burress, and maybe the most under-utilized tight end in football in Dustin Keller – start throwing the ball. That's what this league is going to, and that's why you traded up to get him in the first round."

Boomer on the Jaguars cutting David Garrard:
"Yes, they did. They didn't believe he could take them to the Super Bowl. So why pay him $8 million if you’re a small market team. They did the right thing."

Kris Jenkins on whether Ndamukong Suh is the best defensive player in the NFL right now:
"Absolutely not.  Right now the current premiere defensive tackle in the league is Haloti Ngata.  And you have to look at the best players in the league on defense: Revis, Polamalu, Demarcus Ware, and so on and so forth.  You can go down that list for a long time."

Boomer on Cam Newton:
"I love Cam Newton's performance last week, and the thing that I saw more than anything was poise. You also have to realize why he had so much success. The Arizona defense was a disaster. They had communication problems. They busted coverages. But give the kid credit because he found where those busted coverages were. I think he's going to be a tremendous player in this league. I just don't think we're going to see that today against Dom Capers and this defense because they won't have the same breakdowns."

"Inside the NFL" GM Charley Casserly also dropped a lot of knowledge in his segment:
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Posted on: September 18, 2011 12:59 pm
Edited on: September 18, 2011 1:57 pm
 

Vikings have 'no intention' of benching McNabb

Posted by Will Brinson


Donovan McNabb didn't exactly have the best numbers on Sunday -- 39 yards passing against the Chargers in an embarrassing effort as the Vikings fell to 0-1.

Considering that Minnesota drafted Christian Ponder out of Florida State, it wouldn't be shocking to hear any chatter about whether or not McNabb should remain the starter for the duration of the season. He might not hold that role all year, but CBS Sports' Charley Casserly reported Sunday that, at least for right now, the Vikings have "no intention of benching" McNabb.

"I want continuity this year," Vikings head coach Leslie Frazier told Casserly.

Frazier cited McNabb's last season with the Redskins -- proving that we (the public, the media) are not alone in thinking that what went down in Washington was just ridiculous.

And that's precisely why Frazier wants to provide some continuity for the veteran; yanking him out of the lineup and rolling with Ponder might work OK, but it also has the potential for immediate failure. If that's the case, Frazier would have to throw McNabb back out there as a starter.

It's an awkward and touchy situation, but it's a smart move by Frazier to at least stick with one plan going forward. That plan is McNabb, for better or for worse.

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Posted on: September 14, 2011 10:42 am
Edited on: September 14, 2011 10:43 am
 

Top Ten with a Twist: Comeback players

M. Stafford, if he stays healthy, could be a candidate for comeback player of the year (US Presswire).

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Some had disappointing seasons last year only to find themselves in a brand-new setting this year. Some had worn out their welcome in one city and were rewarded with a new home in a new part of the country. Some were injured, and some just flat-out stunk.

But this is a new season, and it’s never too early to make predictions about the 2011 comeback player of the year, especially since two-time winner Chad Pennington is out for the season and won’t be eligible for his third award until 2012.

You won’t find Albert Haynesworth on this list, because a man who duped one organization out of tens of millions dollars only to find himself holding a golden parachute to the league’s most respected franchise doesn’t need another reward if he potentially plays well (or, unlike in Washington, plays at all). But pretty much everybody else is eligible for a spot on our latest Top Ten with a Twist: Potential Comeback Players of the Year.

10. Kevin Kolb: I originally wasn’t going to put him on this list, because simply put, I’m not entirely sure he’s going to live up to his $63 million ($20 million guaranteed) contract in Arizona. But after his 18 of 27, 309-yard, two-touchdown performance in the Cardinals win against the Panthers (all while getting sucked into the “Cam Newton is awesome” maelstrom), it’s at least a possibility Kolb will play like Arizona believes he can. Kolb supporters point to an impressive two-game stretch he had in 2009 for why he’s worth all that money. I’m more interested in his 130 quarterback rating from Sunday and where he can go from there.

9. Chris Johnson: You might not know this, but last year, Johnson had a disastrous season. When you compare him to 2009, his performance declined by more than 600 yards and he scored three less rushing touchdowns. If that’s not the sign of a guy who has already become much less effective … wait, what’s that? Johnson still rushed for 1,364 yards and 11 touchdowns last season? Oh, never mind. But here’s the thing with Johnson. He keeps proclaiming that he’s going to rush for 2,000 yards, and while he did it in 2009, he fell woefully short last year. And yes, he won’t make it 2,000 in 2011 either. But he’ll also be better than last year, particularly since he now should be completely happy with the money he’s making.

8. Bob Sanders: We all know Bob Sanders can’t stay healthy. Not after missing 64 of 112 career games with the Colts. And because we’ve barely seen the guy (only nine times in the past three seasons) we always seem to lose sight of the fact that Sanders was once a premier safety threat  mentioned in the same breathe as Troy Polamalu and Ed Reed. One good sign for Sanders’ return to respectability: he didn’t have to spend this offseason rehabbing an old injury. But Sanders also is 30 now, where the aches and pains increase rather than diminish. In his first game with San Diego, he accumulated six tackles. But at least he didn’t leave the game with an injury. Which, with Sanders, is pretty good news.

7. Tim Hightower: You’ll recall that Hightower had a bit of a fumbling problem as the No. 2 running back behind Beanie Wells in Arizona -- he had eight lost fumbles combined in the past two seasons -- and though Hightower had good production in place of the injured Wells, the Cardinals decided they’d rather have Wells than Hightower. The Redskins, who were saying goodbye to Clinton Portis, went after him, and their interest was rewarded this week when Hightower looked solid, rushing 25 times for 72 yards and a score. Just as important, though, is his pass protection and his versatility (he’s a pretty good receiver as well). Just as long as he doesn’t fumble, he could be a really good addition for Washington.

6. Steve Smith (Eagles version): We still don’t know how healthy Smith is, but the fact that he was active for the first game -- much to the chagrin of the Giants, I imagine -- is awfully impressive, considering he was coming off microfracture surgery on his knee. He wasn’t targeted by Michael Vick, and he didn’t play all that much. But the fact he was out there at all was pretty ridiculous. Smith probably won’t be healthy enough to produce the stats that would give him a legit shot at the comeback player of the year, but he’s already gone to extraordinary lengths to return this soon, so why not?

Henne5. Steve Smith (Panthers version): Aside from all those Panthers fans who now have hope, receiver Steve Smith has to be one of the biggest Cam Newton fans around. For a guy who wanted out of Carolina as soon as possible (and as receiver, why would he want to try to field passes from Jimmy Clausen?), the infusion of Newton into this offense was the main reason Smith exploded for eight catches, 178 yards and two touchdowns. Considering he only accumulated 46 catches for 554 yards and two (!) scores in 2010, a little Newton in his life apparently has gone a long way.

4. Chad Henne: Despite Miami fans chanting that they wanted Kyle Orton (who now has to hear the chants of “We want Tebow” in Denver) in the preseason, the popular storyline out of south Florida is that Henne finally will turn himself into a legit starting quarterback. Henne was a major storyline in the offseason -- coach Tony Sparano said “we’ll see” about Henne’s chances of starting and receiver Brandon Marshall laid out in detail why Tyler Thigpen was a better player until Henne began to make believers out of his teammates, who voted him offensive captain. It’ll continue to be a storyline as long as Henne plays the way he did against the Patriots (30 of 49 for 416 yards, two touchdowns and a garbage-time interception) in one of the best performances of his pro career.

3. Rex Grossman: Based on the way he played against the Giants on Sunday, I thought about putting Grossman higher on the list. But I just don’t see him as a top-15 quarterback -- this season or any other. Maybe if he got to play against the Giants shell of a defense every week. But until that happens, I don’t see him taking home the hardware. That said, Grossman surprised many people this week -- including, I imagine, John Beck -- and didn’t look like the same quarterback who was Donovan McNabb’s two-minute offense replacement. At least, he played like a legitimate starting quarterback.

2. Bryant McKinnie: Surely, McKinnie would be the first comeback player of the year award winner to have weighed 400 pounds (allegedly) and gotten released from his old team for it (not to mention earning $75,000 for getting down to a trim 372). But McKinnie, as the new left tackle for the Ravens, helped set the tone last Sunday when, on the first play of the first Ravens drive, he dispatched Steelers linebackers James Farrior and James Harrison, allowing Baltimore running back Ray Rice a 36-yard gain. Baltimore ended up beating Pittsburgh by four touchdowns, and don’t think McKinnie wasn’t a big reason for that. If he keeps it up, perhaps McKinnie can make history as the first offensive line ever to win the award.

1. Matthew Stafford: The Lions quarterback scared the daylights out of just about everybody when he hobbled to the sideline with an apparent injury in Detroit’s season-opening win against the Buccaneers. For a guy who’s missed 19 games the past two years with various ailments, that was not a moment for the weak at the heart. But it was only cramps, and during Detroit’s victory, Stafford showed that he still has the talent to be a top-five quarterback. And considering most of the comeback players of the year happen to be quarterbacks, that doesn’t hurt his chances either.

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Posted on: August 26, 2011 11:29 am
 

QB job still up for grabs in Washington



Posted by Ryan Wilson

When head coach Mike Shanahan benched Donovan McNabb last season for Rex Grossman, it seemed like the latest chapter in the unintentional comedy stylings of an organization that had been on the wrong side of seemingly every personnel decision in the Dan Snyder era. The faces change, yes, but the story remains the same.

Or so the thinking went.

And while it's way too early to make any grand proclamations about the 2011 season, we feel comfortable enough with what we've seen from Grossman and John Beck to say this: the Skins' quarterbacks aren't that bad. Soft bigotry of low expectations? Perhaps, but we are talking about the Redskins. Yes, that phrase was coined in Washington, and while it wasn't originally intended for the Skins it might as have been.

But as Shanahan begins his second season as the head coach (and his son, Kyle, as the offensive coordinator), the offense looks like something more than a hastily assembled pick-up squad. And we can't stress this enough: they're doing it with Grossman and Beck, one a former first-round pick destined for the life of a backup, and the other a guy who last started an NFL game in 2007 -- four of them, all losses.

So after Grossman made easy work of the Steelers in Week 1 of the preseason, Beck showed well against the Colts in Week 2, and both held their own against the Ravens Thursday night, the starting quarterback situation remains … up in the air. At least to hear Shanahan tell it.

“I’m going to evaluate them all the way through camp, all the way through the last preseason game, possibly up to the day before we play the Giants,” said Shanahan, according to CSNWashington.com, after the Redskins lost, 34-31, to the Ravens. “It all depends on if someone separates themselves.”

"If someone separates themselves" isn't always a positive. It could be the case that two prospective quarterbacks are playing so poorly that a coach is praying one can achieve mediocrity in time for the season. Grossman and Beck present the Redskins with a good problem: two guys playing well, moving the chains and, ultimately, scoring points. Of course, there's always the fear that Grossman reverts to the player we've come to know from his inconsistent days in Chicago. And Beck, despite a four-year NFL career, has next to no actual game experience.

Also not helping: the Skins play in the NFC East, the division the Eagles are predestined to win according to oracle and backup quarterback Vince Young.

But this is the preseason, where every team still has visions of the playoffs, and hopes haven't yet been crushed by the stark reality of the regular season. And for two Redskins' quarterbacks, that means trying to earn the starting nod.

“I do know both of us feel pretty good about what we’ve done,” Beck said. “I’ve tried to do everything I can. Is it enough? That’s hard to say, because I’m not making the decision.”

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Posted on: August 22, 2011 1:42 pm
Edited on: August 22, 2011 3:59 pm
 

Raiders take Terrelle Pryor in third round

T. Pryor was taken by Oakland in the third round of the supplemental draft (Getty).

Posted by Josh Katzowitz


In a move that was ridiculously predictable and (probably) predictably ridiculous, the Raiders have taken Terrelle Pryor in the third round of the NFL’s supplemental draft. According to ESPN’s Adam Schefter, it was with the No. 18 pick.

According to NFL.com's Albert Breer, Pryor immediately got on the phone with Raiders coach Hue Jackson and said, "I'll be there, and I'll be ready ... I can't wait." Breer also quoted agent Drew Rosenhaus saying, "I'm optimistic we'll get a deal done tonight."

The move isn’t a surprise, especially since we know the Raiders’ obsession with speedy draft picks and with the news that Pryor ran between a 4.38 and a 4.41 40 during his Pro Day last weekend. While the rest of his Pro Day was uneven for a quarterback -- his accuracy wasn’t that great -- his speed really stood out, especially considering he’s 6 foot 5 and 230 pounds.

Pryor's Journey to Oakland
Assuming Pryor, who will miss the first five games of the season because of a suspension, remains a quarterback, he would be entering a position that’s actually pretty deep in Oakland with Jason Campbell as the starter and Trent Edwards and Kyle Boller as the backups.

Which might mean the Raiders could try to turn Pryor into a tight end. And considering Oakland lost standout tight end Zach Miller to the Seahawks and replaced him with a lesser talent in Kevin Boss, a move like that would make a little bit of sense.

Still, the third round seems a bit high, right? As one of my editors pointed out, the Vikings got Donovan McNabb for a sixth-round pick this year, and the Raiders were willing to wager a third-rounder on Pryor? Are there many in the league at this point who would feel more comfortable playing Pryor at the quarterback spot instead of McNabb? I can't image so.

It’s interesting that the Raiders would take him so high, but in their mind, they might have felt like they had no other choice. They didn’t have a fourth-round pick because they’d already traded that selection to the Redskins to bring in Campbell. If they waited until the fifth round to select Pryor, there was a real chance he’d already be gone.

As of now, the Raiders have mortgaged half of next year’s draft, because they’d already traded their second-round pick to the Patriots -- meaning they don’t have a second, third or fourth-round draft pick for 2012. That’s not to say Oakland won’t be involved in trades that gets the club a draft pick in those rounds, but for now, the Raiders really have to hope the Campbell and Pryor picks were the right moves to make.

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Posted on: August 17, 2011 4:24 pm
 

Roundtable: Which rookie QB will help the most?

C. Newton could be one of the breakout rookie QBs this year (Getty).

Posted by Eye on Football staff

Well, we're a week into the preseason and that means we know everything about everyone. Or nothing at all. Whatever, we got our first glimpses of the NFL's newest rookie quarterbacks and that leads us to the question: What rookie quarterback will help his team the most?

Will Brinson: Go ahead and cue up about 15 "Panthers homer" comments in the next few paragraphs, but I don't care: Cam Newton. The guy's a freak-a-deak athlete with a firehose attached to his right shoulder and he's going to get a chance to produce. Unfortunately, that firehose thing can also be bad if Newton can't control his accuracy. And it's possible that Jimmy Clausen -- who looked better than terrible after he threw a pick six on his second passing attempt -- could be the safer option for Carolina. But Newton gets the fanbase amped and he's already shown exponential growth since we last saw him throwing passes. Putting him in the proverbial fire's the way to go and he'll be a difference maker for Carolina in both the stands and the field.

Josh Katzowitz: Will, I couldn't agree with you more. I don't know if Newton will help his team that much more on the field than Clausen would have -- I'm willing to bet heavily on the odds that there are going to be games when Newton is ABSOLUTELY terrible and people are going to be saying, "Yeah, buddy, the NFL is a little different than the limited offense you ran at Auburn, eh?" (these people, of course, will be Canadians who care way too much about SEC football) -- but as far as starpower is concerned, Newton is the one. I don't care if he privately looks at himself as an entertainer and an icon. He's got that huge smile and he's got that charisma, and eventually, the stink of whatever NCAA rules his dad might have violated will wash away.

That said, I don't think he's going to contend for any rookie of the year honors, because as the season goes along, defenses are going to begin to figure out Newton. Actually, I think the real answer to your question about which rookie will help his team the most will end up being Colin Kaepernick in San Francisco, assuming he stays healthy behind that poor offensive line. Alex Smith will continue to be Alex Smith, and midway through the season, Jim Harbaugh will call upon Kaepernick to replace Smith and win a few games for the 49ers. And I think he'll do it, especially in the NFC West, hastening Smith's departure (which, when you think about it, might be the single biggest reason how Kaepernick impacts the team). Newton will help his franchise the most, but Kaepernick will help his team the most.

Ryan Wilson
: We talked about it (at length, I might add) and Newton was impressive. I know, it's just one preseason game, but the guy's come a long way since February, the Auburn scandal, and the silly comments about being an entertainer and an icon.

And let's be honest, he's energized fans that had every reason to lose all hope and commit their energies to supporting NASCAR full time. That can't be understated. Winning is obviously the goal, but Panthers fans will find reasons for optimism if the Panthers can win five or six games. So in terms of therapeutic value for a downtrodden fan base, Newton is this season's most valuable QB.

A. Dalton could be the starting QB in Cincinnati (Getty). But if we're talking about a QB who has a chance to play and help his team win enough games to battle for a playoff spot, I'm going with Christian Ponder. Partly because Myron Rolle thinks he's a genius, but also because Donovan McNabb has become a punchline in recent years. How long until he's yanked in favor of Ponder? Four weeks? Remember: this is the guy who not only lost his job to Rex Grossman last season, he was eventually demoted to third string behind John Beck, he of four career starts, all losses, all coming in 2007.

Brinson: Well, we're one full turn around the table and the only person we haven't talked about is the only guy who's virtually guaranteed to start Week 1: Andy Dalton.

So, um, yeaaaaaaah.

What does that say about the Bengals? (And why do I have the feeling Josh will try to defend them?) I guess it says either that "We don't respect Andy Dalton," "We forgot about Andy Dalton," or "Even if Andy Dalton was Peyton Manning, he wouldn't be saving the Bengals from certain doom in 2011."

Perhaps it's all three?

Wilson: I didn't mention Andy Dalton for the same reason I don't think about paying my mortgage every day: if I ignore it, it don't exist. It's a coping mechanism. In Dalton's case, it means I'm not constantly reminded of what the 2011 season inevitably holds for him: pain, misery, disappointment -- all words that have become synonymous with the Bengals in recent years.

(Just look what the madness did to even-keeled Carson Palmer -- it drove him right into retirement in what should be the prime of his career. Think about that for a minute. Things were so god-awful in Cincinnati that Palmer would rather sit around the house doing crosswords than get caught up in tiger-striped maelstrom for another season.)

While we shouldn't put too much stock in first-ever preseason performances, Dalton's got his introduction to big-boy football from, fittingly, Ndamukong Suh. And I feel that was just a preview of things to come in 2011 (for both Dalton and Suh). So, yeah, it's pretty easy to be down on Dalton, more because he's a victim of circumstance. Which is why I don't want to think about it.

Brinson: Thanks for the reminder on the mortgage payment, jerk. Speaking of which, if there's one thing that the Panthers, 49ers, Titans, Vikings, Jaguars and Bengals have in common it's that they mortgaged their future on the talents of the 2011 NFL Draft class. With that in mind, let's wrap up this puppy up by making a list -- how do you gents rank the rookies in terms of impact on the 2011 season? Here's mine. Don't copy it.

1. Cam Newton
2. Blaine Gabbert
3. Andy Dalton
4. Christian Ponder
5. Jake Locker
6. Colin Kaepernick
7. Ryan Mallet
8. Terrelle Pryor

PonderWilson: No matter the list -- or the topic -- one thing is assured: Brinson will put Cam Newton at the top of it. Panthers fan solidarity and whatnot.

Back on Earth...

1. Christian Ponder (He'll be starting before the end of Sept.)
2. Colin Kaepernick (See above)
3. Blaine Gabbert (He'll be starting before Halloween)
4. Cam Newton (The next Jimmy Clausen? JOKE. Clearly, he's the next Chris Weinke.)
5. Andy Dalton (Must've been a serial killer in a previous life to get stuck with this fate.)
6. Jake Locker (Should only play if Hasselbeck gets injured.)
7. Ryan Mallett (Bill Belichick is a genius. That is all.)
8. Terrelle Pryor (But he's a first-round pick!)

Katzowitz: Just in case, Will needs a reminder: Here's my takedown of Mike Brown and Marvin Lewis in that ridiculous news conference they called to announce that Lewis would return for another season, and here's what I wrote about the Bengals' lack of a practice bubble. I lived in Cincinnati for six years, but believe me when I say that I think the Bengals are an incompetent mess (though, personally, I think Mike Brown is a nice man).

My list (the correct one):

1. Colin Kaepernick (If Mike Singletary thought about replacing Alex Smith with David Carr (!) last season, Jim Harbaugh shouldn't have a problem replacing Smith with Kaepernick)
2. Christian Ponder (Because he's better than Rex Grossman, and since Grossman is better than Donovan McNabb ...)
3. Cam Newton (How disturbing would it be if Clausen actually won the starting job?)
4. Andy Dalton (He still has Cedric Benson to lean on)
5. Blaine Gabbert (I'm not sure he can beat out David Garrard, and I'm not sure Garrard will be bad enough this year to warrant starting Gabbert)
6. Jake Locker (Locker will get tons of help from Hasselbeck)
7. Ryan Mallett (He won't even beat out Brian Hoyer to be Brady's backup)
8. Terrelle Pryor (I don't know, maybe, he could be an effective NFL TE?)

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Posted on: August 12, 2011 9:16 am
 

NFC North podcast preview featuring Dale Jr Jr

Posted by Will Brinson

We're taking a spin around the NFL with our Podcast Preview series this week and our latest stop is in the NFC North. Ryan and I break down a slew of issues relating to the division and I'm joined later by Josh Epstein of the white-hot band Dale Earnhardt Jr., Jr. (buy their new album "It's a Corporate World" on iTunes here; check them out on Facebook here).

Lest you think it's just random awesomeness, Josh is actually a huge Lions fan. And, hey, speaking of the Lions, can they finally "make the leap" to become a non-terrible team this year? Because that's one of the questions we ask. We also wonder if Donovan McNabb is the worst quarterback in the division, if the Vikings are destined for a last-place finish, whether anyone in the entire world will have the stones to pick against Green Bay, if we actually remembered that Chicago won the division last year.

All that -- and much, much, more -- by clicking the play button below. Also, SUBSCRIBE VIA ITUNES.


If you can't view the podcast, click here to download.



For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.


For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: August 10, 2011 10:34 pm
Edited on: August 10, 2011 11:08 pm
 

McNabb brings out the best in Romanowski

B. Romanowski ripped D. McNabb (Getty).Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Apparently, the quantity of people (if not the quality) who decide to spew vile all over Vikings QB Donovan McNabb continues to grow.

You remember Bill Romanowski, right? He was a two-time Pro Bowler, but he was also a jerk, kicking opponents in the head, spitting in other people’s faces and ending a teammate’s career by blasting his eye socket. So, good dude, right?

And it makes him the perfect person to comment on somebody with whom he never played, right? Right? Hello?

Either way, Romanowski was on Jim Rome’s radio show today and, well, he acted just like you’d expect -- he did his best Bernard Hopkins impersonation and ripped the hell out of McNabb for, as far as I can tell, no reason at all.

“The reason why Donovan McNabb is not in Washington right now is because he was lazy,” Romanowski said, via PFT.com. “He didn’t spend the time. Mike Shanahan likes guys who will work really hard. I narrow it down to two things. He’s either lazy, or he’s not very bright to pick up the offense. One or the other. I think he’s bright enough, I just think he was lazy.”

And, just for the hell of it, Rome asked how Romanowski would act around Broncos QB Tim Tebow?

“I would want to lay him out and put him into next year,” Romanowski said. “I’d have him so messed up mentally he’d be like, ‘Oh, God, this Romanowski is crazy.’”

Um, crazy wasn’t the word I was thinking about.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com