Tag:Logan Mankins
Posted on: August 14, 2010 2:27 pm
 

Logan Mankins still playing hardball

Posted by Andy Benoit

Patriots Pro Bowl left guard Logan Mankins has been quiet lately, but that doesn’t mean he’s any less ardent in his stance for a long-term contract. Mankins continues his holdout.

Sunday is the deadline for the Patriots to send Mankins a letter stating their intent to place him on the roster exempt list. If the club does that, Mankins would have to sit out three games after he signs (preseason games would count). This carries some weight if Mankins is serious about extending his holdout into the regular season. (If he’s on the roster exempt list, he’d have to sign before the eighth game in order to ensure an accredited season).L. Mankins (US Presswire)

Albert Breer of The Boston Globe spoke with Mankins’s camp. Breer writes:

Asked if the letter has come, agent Frank Bauer said, "We haven't got it yet, but it'll come." Then asked where the negotiations stand, Bauer said he has heard "Not a word" from the team. "They don't care. ... I would expect them to do everything nasty that they can," he added.

"They have totally lost this player mentally," Bauer said. "For this young man to work like he has and play for the club for five years, and be promised he'd be taken care of, and to throw the offer they did across the table? It was never, ever a five-year deal. They wanted six years, they wanted seven. They have to do what they have to do, and we'll do what we have to do."

My understanding is that the offer on the table was a five-year extension off his RFA tender from this year (before it was chopped down), and would legitimately make him the third-highest paid guard in the league, with the requisite guarantees and bonuses. That offer was made after Saints guard Jahri Evans got his seven-year, $56.7 million deal in May, and is now off the table.

"This deal and the Jahri Evans deal are apples and oranges," Bauer said.


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Posted on: August 13, 2010 10:17 am
 

Hot Routes 8.13.10: Of Preseason & Port-a-Potties

Got links for the Hot Routes? Follow us on Twitter or send an email to will [dot] brinson [at] cbs [dot] com .
  • Dan Connolly, who filled in -- and will fill in if necessary -- for the still-holding-out Logan Mankins last night, "held his own" according to Ian Rappaport of the Boston Herald . We haven't watched the game yet, because we're too busy swooning over Jimmy Clausen, but this is right in line with what we told Lauren Shehadi about the possibility of the Pats' doing a little "plug-n-play" on the offensive line.
  • Speaking of Clausen, Pat Yasinskas (former Panthers beat writer; now with the NFC South blog at ESPN) thinks that the rook QB "landed some jabs, but nothing close to a knockout punch" in his attempt to go after Matt Moore's job. I've got to agree -- the kid looked really sharp at times, but anyone freaking out over the first preseason game needs to settle down. It's going to take a nightmarish, Jake Delhomme-like start from Moore to force Clausen into a starting role.
  • Optimism reigns supreme at the Baltimore Sun 's Ravens Insider, where everyone seems thrilled at the offense's potent potability (or something). Ken Murray seems the most realistic of the group, though, making sure to point out that against the Panthers, the Ravens ridiculously depleted secondary didn't exactly have a big challenge. Not saying the 2010 AFC North Champions (they lose to the Jets in the AFC Championship, duh) are overrated, but just saying.
  • Jermichael Finley, who Andy is quite high on (more on that with an NFC North podcast coming this afternoon), uses boxing to become a better football player because it helps improve his hand and eye coordination. Until coach Mike McCarthy pointed out that hurting his hands and wrists isn't the best way to get paid as a tight end in the NFL. Smart call.
  • Lovie Smith says the Bears' starters could end up playing a full half against the Chargers. For those of you who (like me) are Dan LeFevour fans, won't you join me: "NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!" /shakes fist angrily to sky
  • Jerry McDonald of Inside Bay Area writes that the D-line "stole the show" for the Raiders last night. And here I was thinking Kyle Boller would get all the attention this morning. McDonald actually makes a good point about Boller too -- the 'Boys dropped an easy red zone interception, and we're not singing his praises this morning if they make the pick happen.

Posted on: July 16, 2010 9:34 am
 

Mankins, Patriots not communicating

L Mankins before a game last season (Getty). If you thought the New England Patriots and the disgruntled Logan Mankins were negotiating behind closed doors to make sure one of the top offensive guards in the NFL was ready to begin training camp, think again.

According to the Boston Herald’s Ian Rapoport , the two sides haven’t even begun to talk.

Part of that likely is because the NFL is on its month-long holiday, but it’s unclear whether Mankins – who missed all of New England’s offseason workouts – will attend training camp.

From the story:

Mankins had refused to sign his one-year restricted free agent tender worth $3.26 million, and the Patriots reduced it to $1.54 million. He’s not under contract, so he simply won’t be paid if he doesn’t show.

Mankins has said his stance is based on principle and that he wanted to be traded. Bauer added that “Mankins is a pretty principled guy.”

While sources have indicated the Pats offered Mankins a deal worth $7 million annually, the guard’s camp puts it at seven years and $6.5 million annually. The guaranteed money is not clear. If 2010 had a salary cap, Mankins would have been a free agent.


Two problems here: 1) New Orleans signed guard Jahri Evans to a huge seven-year, $56 million deal last year and obviously that set a precedent in Mankins’ mind, and 2) Mankins believes the Patriots have been dishonest in promising to take care of him after he played last year at what he believes was a reduced rate.

--Josh Katzowitz

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter.



Posted on: July 14, 2010 12:36 pm
 

Position rankings: guards

Josh Katzowitz and Andy Benoit resume their debate, with today’s focus on guards.

Andy Benoit’s top five
J. Evans (US Presswire)
5. Leonard Davis, Cowboys

4. Steve Hutchinson, Vikings

3. Carl Nicks, Saints

2. Kris Dielman, Chargers

1. Jahri Evans, Saints

As you can see, an unsexy list from the unsexiest position in football. Leonard Davis makes it because he knows how to use his 365-pound size. Everyone thinks Steve Hutchinson is a God, but that’s only because most fans don’t know the names of any other guards. Hutchinson was once the best, but at 32, he’s lost half a step (which is half a step less than Alan Faneca). Of course, Hutchinson had plenty of steps to spare. He still offers good mobility, but his strength in a phone booth has declined.

You might read the name “Carl Nicks” and say Who?! The Saints left guard is a monster in the run game, getting to the second level with regularity. The only thing he struggles with is lateral movement as a pass-blocker. Dielman is rock-solid. Evans is an even better run-blocker than Nicks, plus he’s reliable in pass protection.

Josh Katzowitz's top five

5. Bobbie Williams, Bengals

4. Kris Dielman, Chargers

3. Chris Snee, Giants

2. Jahri Evans, Saints

1. Logan Mankins, Patriots

I agree that Evans is one of the best guards around, but I don’t think he’s earned the title of No. 1 quite yet. Yes, he had a heck of a season last year, and he was rewarded with a seven-year, $56-million contract. But he needs to mirror that performance for at least one more year before I can knight him as the top guy.

Mankins has been the most talked-about guard throughout the offseason because of his contract clashes with New England’s front office. The fact he might not play this year has to be worrisome to Patriots fans. Mankins is strong, and he has good quickness and agility. If he’s playing, he’s the best out there. Andy, I’m surprised you didn’t even put Mankins on your list.

Snee has a great initial punch at the line of scrimmage, and when he gets to the next level, he makes linebackers pay. Plus, he’s durable, starting the last 78 games the Giants have played.

Williams has been the rock of a Bengals offensive line that continues to turn over year after year. He’s underrated and has never made a Pro Bowl squad. He’s not going to wow you, but that doesn’t mean he’s not on the top five fringe. He’s just too consistent and solid for me not to put on this list.

Andy’s rebuttal

Top five fringe is different from top five, Josh. More on that in a second.

I like the Snee pick, and I can certainly live with Mankins (though, obviously, I think No. 1 is too high). Both those guys have the unique ability to land square, domineering blocks off of movement. I still think Hutchinson is elite (or borderline elite), and I’m disappointed you didn’t praise my prescience for going with Nicks now, and not after he gets his first Pro Bowl (either this season or next).

Okay, let’s talk about the fringe pick, Williams. You’re a (former) Bengals Rapid Reporter. I’m not suggesting you lack journalistic integrity – not at all – but I’m willing to bet you have a good working relationship with the 11th-year veteran. From afar, Williams seems like he’d be a good guy. He shows great on-field leadership. So, be honest, did Williams help you write your list?

The problem is, as a player, Williams is too close to the fat part of the bell curve. I’m going to break my rule of never publishing raw notes from film study to share some of what I took away from watching Williams these past two years:

Raw notes from ’09 Bengals film:

Williams shows good power and size when he’s able to be the aggressor. If he’s stepping into a block between first and second level, he’ll move guys. But if the action starts from standstill, he may not win.

Raw notes from ’08 Bengals film:

Williams is about the same as always....decent but not great. Moves okay, doesn’t have ideal power but gets in his spots, etc.
These are descriptions of a solid starter, not a top five player.

Josh’s final word

Ha! If Williams and I had written this list, we would have spent all day laughing about your exclusion of Mankins. True, I’ve covered the Bengals for various outlets for the past five seasons, but I’m an objective journalist and I don’t play favorites (hell I haven’t had a favorite NFL team since I was a kid, and it certainly wasn’t the Bengals). There are a few guys on the Bengals squad that are wonderful with whom to deal, but I haven’t put them on any of our lists. Considering this is the 11th top five list we’ve done and Williams is the first Bengals player I’ve put in the spotlight – and probably the only one I’ll include for the rest of our top five series – well, I think those facts speak for themselves.

Truth be told, I thought about Hutchinson, I thought about Nicks and I thought about Faneca (he’s just nowhere near his prime anymore). I knew you’d hate the Williams pick, but in all my extensive research – and the fact I’ve seen him play scores of games the past few years – I’m more than confident in defending the selection. He’s just too good and consistent.


Other positions: Safety | Cornerback | 3-4 Scheme Outside Linebacker | Punter  | Kicker | 4-3 Scheme Outside Linebacker | Inside Linebacker  | Defensive Tackle  | Defensive End | Offensive Tackle  | Center)


--Josh Katzowitz and Andy Benoit


For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter.

 

 

Posted on: July 6, 2010 10:32 am
 

How the Pats are replacing Mankins

With Logan Mankins holding out, Patriots right tackle Nick Kaczur has been working at left guard, according to Shalise Manza of the Boston Globe.
N. Kaczur (US Presswire)
This makes perfect sense. Kaczur doesn’t have ideal athleticism or footwork for operating on an island. As a left guard, he wouldn’t begin to offer Mankins’ mobility, but he’d at least provide adequate interior strength for New England’s power-blocking system.
Kaczur playing inside means that promising second-year tackle Sebastian Vollmer gets an opportunity to start at right tackle. Many believe Vollmer is the future at left tackle. The Patriots, however, have no interest in moving Matt Light out of that spot in 2010.

Manza doesn’t believe the offensive line’s tepid game of musical chairs will be much of a problem:

The key in all of this - as has been the case for much of the last decade - is the presence of coach Dante Scarnecchia. The sage Scarnecchia is a maestro at getting his linemen to work together and coaching up players; by now it is safe to assume that if a lineman can't succeed under Scarnecchia's tutelage, he won't succeed anywhere. After all, this is a team that won Super Bowls with players like Brandon Gorin, Tom Ashworth and Mike Compton as starting linemen.

--Andy Benoit

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter.
Posted on: June 14, 2010 4:21 pm
Edited on: June 14, 2010 9:47 pm
 

Mankins wants out of New England

Count New England G Logan Mankins as one unhappy Patriot.

Mankins told Mike Reiss of ESPN Boston that he wants to be traded and there is “no way” he’ll sign his $3.26 million tender offer.

"At this point, I'm pretty frustrated, from everything that's happened and the way negotiations have gone," Mankins told Reiss in a phone interview. "I want to be traded. I don't need to be here any more."

One source of Mankins’ frustration is his free agent status. As a sixth-year player, he would have been an unrestricted free agent in normal years. But because this is a non-salary cap season – the final year of the existing Collective Bargaining Agreement – he reverted back to being a restricted free agent.

Naturally, Mankins isn’t expected to attend New England’s min-camp that begins Tuesday.

--Josh Katzowitz

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl.


UPDATE: According to Boston.com's Albert Breer, the Patriots offered Mankins a five-year deal worth around $7 million per season, which would have made him one of the five highest-paid guards in the game.
Category: NFL
Posted on: June 14, 2010 3:20 pm
Edited on: June 20, 2010 11:36 am
 

RFA deadline fast approaching

Tuesday is the day where millions of dollars could be won and millions of dollars could be lost. That day is the deadline when restricted free agents must sign their qualifying offers from their previous team. If not, they’ll only make 110 percent of their 2009 salary.

For players like San Diego WR Vincent Jackson and LT Marcus McNeill, that could cost them a bunch of money. According to Kevin Acee of the San Diego Union-Tribune , neither player will sign their tender offer because they want long-term deals. That means both could lose $2.5 million a piece for this season. It also means they both might just sit out the year in protest.

A player like New England Pro Bowl guard Logan Mankins could lose more than $1.5 million, and a guy like Denver sack-master Elvis Dumervil could have to settle for collecting $630,000 rather than the $3.1 million the Broncos have offered.

One player, like Ray Edwards with the Vikings, went ahead and signed his tender offer today, and I expect a few others to ink their names sometime this evening. Unless you’re trying to project some semblance of leverage – which, honestly, most of the players don’t have because of the potential upcoming lock-out when the Collective Bargaining Agreement expires at the end of this season – it doesn’t make sense not to sign a one-year deal.

But I don’t make millions of dollars per year (hint, hint CBSSports.com upper management), so I don’t have that perspective.

On Sunday, Pro Football Talk had an interesting theory, based off something the Boston Globe’s Albert Breer wrote a few days ago. PFT wonders if the smell of collusion is in the air.

One reason this topic has been raised: teams sent letters to the players who hadn’t signed their RFA tenders, which suggests some sort of league-wide memo was passed around on how to handle the scenario. If that’s true – or even remotely true – the NFL Players Association might have something to say about that.

From the NFL owners’ perspective, it makes sense not to re-up their players for long-term contracts, especially with the uncertainty of what happens when the CBA ends. But at the same time, the Colts gave S Antoine Bethea a four-year, $27 million extension last week, so we know it is physically possible to compromise with the players.

Diff’rent strokes for diff’rent owners, one supposes. But if players like Jackson and McNeill sit out the season, everybody – with the exception of San Diego’s 2010 opponents – loses.

UPDATE: According to Lindsay Jones of the Denver Post on her Twitter account, Dumervil has signed his tender.

--Josh Katzowitz

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl.


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com