Tag:Will Brinson
Posted on: July 15, 2011 3:52 pm
Edited on: July 15, 2011 4:11 pm
 

Brandon Marshall: 'My wife did not stab me'

Posted by Will Brinson

Way back in April, Dolphins wide receiver Brandon Marshall was taken to the hospital after being stabbed at his home in Florida. Police arrested his wife, Michi Nagomi-Marshall, on aggravated assault charges. (She was later arrested again at their home.)

A little over a week ago, Marshall reportedly chatted with the Broward County Sheriff's Department about the incident, despite his best attempts to avoid such a conversation.

On Friday, he talked publicly about the incident for the first time and claimed his wife didn't stab him.

"I can't talk about the details of the incident because it's still an open case, but I did talk to the state attorney's office last month and the one thing I made clear was my wife did not stab me," Marshall said, per Omar Kelly of the Miami Sun-Sentinel. "She didn't assault me.

"We were having a marital dispute that got heated, but it didn't happen as reported."

All couples do have arguments, but it's a little more awkward when one of parties in the relationship ends up getting stabbed. When the other party in the relationship admits to the stabbing, that doesn't help things either.

Given that everyone's okay (insofar as we know), what about the football aspect of this? Marshall has received support from the Dolphins, who have a pretty penny -- draft picks to acquire him as well as a hefty contract extension -- invested in the wideout.

That they would cut him in such a critical year for the front office and coaching staff seems unlikely. And the market for trading him, especially with a shortened offseason, a bigger free-agent pool and Marshall's history of off-field troubles, won't exactly be expansive.

So more than likely, he ends up sticking with the Fins, while treading on thin ice and under the watchful eye of 280 Park Avenue once the lockout ends.

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Posted on: July 15, 2011 1:40 pm
Edited on: July 15, 2011 6:10 pm
 

Report: Rookies will get '40-50%' less in 2011

Posted by Will Brinson

At the beginning of the lockout (in the long, long ago), the rookie-wage scale wasn't something too many people worried about. After all, lowering the amount of guaranteed money given to risky rookies was a sensible move for both sides.

The wage scale, however, popped up as an issue in later stages of negotiations. Fortunately, both sides found common ground and, as our own Mike Freeman reported on Thursday, worked out the "basic parameters of a rookie-wage scale proposal."

Those basic parameters, according to ESPN, involve four-year deals for rookies with team options for a fifth year.

There would be an approximate decrease in money to rookies by "40-50" percent, with that money directed to veterans and retired players. But Adam Schefter's report indicates that during the fifth, optioned year the player would receive "a salary equal to the average of the top 10 player salaries" at that player's respective position.

Yes, this is similar to the calculations for the franchise tag and, yes, it gives clubs a reason to re-negotiate with third- and fourth-year players ahead of time if they're performing at an elite level.

Latest on Labor

Picks 11-32 under the reported system would receive a fifth-year salary equal to the average of the No. 3-25 salaries at their respective positions. And, finally, Schefter reports that the money involved would be guaranteed if the fifth-year option was "exercised after the third year" of the deal.

You can argue up-and-down about who won (and who lost; though it's pretty obvious that the rookies did and it's pretty obvious why no one was telling them anything) this area of negotiating, but the truth is that it presents a fair way in which to reward players whose talent shines early in their career without penalizing teams too drastically for a failure to evaluate talent at the top of the draft.

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Posted on: July 15, 2011 12:05 pm
Edited on: July 15, 2011 1:13 pm
 

Report: Economics portion of a new CBA are 'done'

Posted by Will Brinson

On Thursday night, CBSSports.com's Mike Freeman reported that the NFL's labor situation was close to an end and that the NFL and players' efforts at getting a new CBA in place were at the "half-yard line."

On Friday, the information relating to the lockout's been flowing in at at a breakneck pace that's so optimistic it would make a scientology recruiter blush.

Two bigger pieces of news stand out. Primarily, there's a report from the NFL Network's Albert Breer, who notes that "the economics of a deal are done." That's something that echoes what Freeman's been hearing, and is particularly awesome to hear. If the money's figured out, everything else will fall into place.

Breer does note that there are "plenty of other hoops" for the respective sides to jump through, including retiree benefits, "player safety, worker's compensation and injury guarantees, and also litigation entanglements."

Latest on Labor

Lest anyone think differently, those are indeed potential dealbreakers, especially if the "litigation entanglements" involve "how to solve future litigation issues" and "what to do with the current lawsuit hanging out there."

But his report on NFL.com, in addition to being a nice place to hear a report that a deal is done on the NFL labor situation, is laced with optimism.

Additionally, Adam Schefter of ESPN reports that a new CBA "will be 7 to 10 years." Though that's a reasonably broad spectrum -- it was widely assumed that eight years was the floor with 12 years as the ceiling -- it's still fantastic news that the progress made by the owners and players hasn't necessitated a shortening of the CBA to five years, simply for the sake of knocking a deal out.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com