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Tag:Randy Moss
Posted on: December 1, 2010 12:19 am
 

Top Ten With a Twist: Not yet HOFers

Fireworks fly during the 2010 Pro Football HOF induction ceremony (US Presswire).

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

The Pro Football Hall of Fame this past Sunday released the names of the 26 semifinalists that could be inducted into the HOF for 2011. Most of the names you know. You’ve watched them play. You’ve watched them win. You’ve watched them etch out fantastic careers.

Last year, you knew guys like Jerry Rice and Emmitt Smith were going to make their way into the HOF in their first years of eligibility. These players were some of the best of all time. It was no contest.

But each year, there are certain players or coaches or executives that are left out who deserve to enter the hallowed halls of the … well … Hall. This Top Ten With a Twist isn’t about the players you know who full well will be inducted into next year’s induction class, minus Prime Time. These are the guys who might not, but who probably should be.

10. George Young, executive: I wonder if Young’s enshrinement has been held off because his skills had declined noticeably late in his career (ie. when free agency was introduced to the game in the early 1990s). But there’s no denying that Young was the NFL executive of the year five times and the teams he worked for won three conference titles and one Super Bowl title. For an executive, he was pretty damn important.

9. Jerry Kramer, OG, Packers (1958-68): While he was a very good player in his day – as the three Pro Bowls, five All-Pro selections and the oodles of championships attest – he did the world a favor when he wrote Instant Replay in 1967, giving fans an inside look at what occurs during an NFL season and at coach Vince Lombardi. No, it’s no Ball Four by Jim Bouton (that guy never could get in baseball’s HOF, by the way), but Kramer’s impact on how the fans view the game is an important piece of the NFL’s history.

8. Steve Tasker, WR/ST, Oilers (1985-86), Bills (1986-97): During his 14-year career, Tasker started a total of 15 games. He never had more than 21 catches in a season, and he caught nine touchdown passes. But the fact he’s perhaps the best special teams player ever to compete in the NFL should give him a path to the HOF. He was a 5-foot-9, 180-pound gunner, and he was fast and lethal. He went to the Pro Bowl seven times, and he was named the MVP of the Pro Bowl in 1993. He didn’t make it to the semifinals this year, but that’s not surprising. Special teamers are not given their just due (see No. 1).

7. Andre Reed, WR, Bills (1985-99), Redskins (2000): Reed has gotten caught up in the WR numbers game. He’s been eligible at the same time as Michael Irvin, Jerry Rice, Tim Brown, Art Monk and Cris Carter, and I can see why it’d be tough to select Reed instead of those kinds of receivers. But you have to remember that Reed ranks ninth in career receptions all time and 11th in receiving yards. At some point, he deserves to be enshrined in Canton. Don’t expect it to happen this year, though.

6. Dermontti Dawson, C, Steelers (1988-2000): Simply put, he’s one of the greatest centers of all time. He made the Pro Bowl seven-straight seasons, and with his athletic ability and his knack for getting out in open space and making key blocks for his running backs, he changed the perception of what a center should be. He’ll probably become a finalist for the second time in as many years. One of these days, he should get the welcoming phone call.

5. Cris Carter, WR, Eagles (1987-89), Vikings (1990-2001), Dolphins (2002): Much like Reed, Carter is overshadowed by other receivers. He finished his career as the No. 2 WR (behind Jerry Rice) in receptions and touchdowns. He’s been passed by Marvin Harrison on the receptions list and by Randy Moss and Terrell Owens on the touchdowns list since he retired, but at some point, Carter should be in. It’s actually a little surprising that he’s not in already.

4. Don Coryell, coach: Yes, he wasn’t the originator of today’s modern offense – that’d be a combination of Sid Gillman, Paul Brown and various others – but his Air Coryell teams in the late 1970s to mid 1980s with the Chargers helped innovate the passing game we still see today. He’s already a member of the College Football Hall of Fame. Now, it’s time for him to join Gillman as the only two coaches to be enshrined in the college and the pro Halls of Fame.

3. Deion Sanders, CB/PR, Falcons (1989-93), 49ers (1994), Cowboys (1995-99), Redskins (2000), Ravens (2004-05) : The reasons why are obvious. Just look at the video below. This is his first year eligible, and there’s little chance he won’t make it in immediately.



2. Ed Sabol, contributor: Enjoy watching NFL Films productions? You like watching the behind-the-scenes spots of the players woofing at each other on the sidelines and your favorite coach’s pregame and postgame speeches? If yes, you can thank Sabol, who helped found NFL Films in the mid-1960s. How differently would we view – and think about – the NFL if Sabol hadn’t been such a visionay? That’s unanswerable of course, but the fact NFL Films plays a big role in an NFL’s viewing experience makes Sabol HOF worthy.

1. Ray Guy, P, Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders (1973-86): Simply put, Guy is the greatest punter in the history of the game. But there are no kickers enshrined in the HOF. That must mean they’re less important than anybody else, right? Well, we all know that’s not true. It’s time to get Guy into the Hall. He deserves it.

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Posted on: November 29, 2010 4:37 pm
 

Hot Routes 11.29.10 Sunday box score tidbits

Hot Routes

Posted by Andy Benoit

Mike Tolbert had 26 carries for 103 yards.

Chargers inside linebacker Kevin Burnett has been one of the most pleasantly surprising players of 2010. He led the team with 10 tackles Sunday night.

Matt Ryan threw just four incompletions against the Packers Sunday.

Greg Jennings continued his dominance with 119 yards on five catches. Jennings averaged 36.6 yards per outing the first five games; he’s averaged 106.5 in the past six games. (One factor has been increased opportunities resulting from the absence of Jermichael Finley.)

The Steelers ran 83 plays against the Steelers, seemingly all of them coming on the first drive.

The Steelers also had over 100 yards in penalties for a second straight week.

Hines Ward had 107 yards receiving. Fred Jackson led the Bills with 105.

Donte Whitner had 18 tackles for the Bills. That speaks well for the safety and poorly for the front seven’s run defense.

Another strong outing for Peyton Hillis: 26 carries, 131 yards against the Panthers. Oh, and three touchdowns. Hillis has 11 rushing touchdowns on the season. If 131 yards rushing aren’t enough, how about the 63 yards Hillis added through the air?

Abram Elam, a safety, led the Browns with two tackles for a loss AND two sacks Sunday.

The Jaguars rushed for 207 yards against the Giants, with more than 140 of them coming in the first half. Maurice Jones-Drew had a career-high fourth-straight 100-yard game. Backup Rashad Jennings (seven carries, 53 yards) continues to look better each week.

Brandon Jacobs got 14 carries (87 yards). Ahmad Bradshaw got nine (49 yards).

Giants wide receivers caught a total of five passes Sunday.

Despite being without Adrian Peterson most of the day, the Vikings outrushed the Redskins 137-29.

Toby Gerhardt had 76 yards on 22 carries. In a startling display of consistency, Gerhardt’s longest carry was just six yards.

Jared Allen recorded a sack and three tackles for a loss. He has 5.5 sacks his last three games after getting just one sack his first seven. (A few of his 5.5 sacks have been cheap, though.)

The Titans had just nine first downs at Houston, two of them coming from Texan penalties.

Randy Moss got his first, second and third catch as a Viking, though even listing them one at a time like that doesn’t make the total sound at all substantial.

Arian Foster: 30 carries,143 yards; nine receptions, 75 yards.

Miami Dolphins: 82 plays. Oakland Raiders: 45. What does this tell us? Oakland’s run defense still isn’t good. (Dolphins had 186 yards on the ground.)

Worth mentioning is that the Raiders run offense doesn’t appear to be very good, either. The Raiders ran the ball 12 times for 16 yards. Darren McFadden was stifled for the second week in a row.

The rushing disparity in Oakland almost pales to that in Seattle. The Chiefs: 270 yards on the ground. The Seahawks: 20. The Chiefs had the ball for more than 41 minutes.

Fantasy owners, take note: Seahawks wideout Ben Obomanu was impressive for a second straight week. The willowy fifth-year pro had 159 yards on five receptions.

Michael Vick’s 333 yards passing marked his second 300-yard game this season and just the fourth of his career. The Bears held Vick to 44 yards on nine runs.

The Bears’ top three wideouts, Devin Hester, Earl Bennett and Johnny Knox, all went for over 55 yards receiving.

The people calling for Josh McDaniels’ head can’t use the Jay Cutler trade as part of their argument. Kyle Orton threw for 347 yards and three touchdowns against the Rams. Clearly, offense is not the problem in Denver.

Joe Flacco continues to quietly post big numbers. He had 289 yards through the air against the Bucs, with two touchdowns and only one pick (the Aqib Talib interception between the knees).

Bucs rookie DT Gerald McCoy had two sacks and two tackles for a loss.




Combed through all the box scores to bring you any nuggets that may have fallen through the cracks. Enjoy.

No need to read the Colts-Chargers box score too closely – only one stat stands out: Chargers zero turnovers, Colts five.
Posted on: November 27, 2010 8:58 pm
 

Hot Routes 11.27.10: Raiders fool us all



Posted by Josh Katzowitz

- So, it’s looking like Raiders QB Bruce Gradkowski will get the start this week in place of Jason Campbell. Which isn’t what we expected yesterday.

- Rams RB Steven Jackson has been using an altitude tent this week in preparation for facing the Broncos in Denver. Meanwhile, St. Louis CB Ronald Bartell tried his twice, and he’s not going to use it ever again. Read this St. Louis Post Dispatch story to find out why (ahem, he might have got himself stuck inside).

- It might not be rocket science, but Titans QB Rusty Smith likely will look to pass more to WR Randy Moss than his predecessors. Before they got injured, Vince Young and Kerry Collins targeted Moss a combined total of four times, and last week, Young looked his way just once. When Smith entered the game, by the way, he tried throwing to Moss three times.

- Watching the Chargers-Broncos game last week, I was struck by how often Denver QB Kyle Orton threw toward the receiver who was being covered by San Diego rookie CB Antoine Cason. And I was struck by how well Cason played. In actuality, Cason has been pretty good most of the season.

- What will happen to Tarvaris Jackson now? Maybe he should just get the hell out of Dodge.

- Once again, nobody has any idea if Antonio Gates’ foot will allow him to play this weekend. Plantar fasciitis sounds less than fun.

- Jake Delhomme will start Sunday for the Browns when he takes on his old team, the Panthers. But he understands who Cleveland’s quarterback of the future is. His name is Colt McCoy.

- Jimmy Clausen will start at QB this Sunday for the Panthers. Who backs him up is a little more complicated.

- The Redskins today waived WR Joey Galloway. In many fans' views, it's about freakin' time .

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .
Posted on: November 27, 2010 11:43 am
 

Week 12 injury news and analysis, part I

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Jaguars at Giants

Two of Jacksonville’s most important offensive players, WR Mike Sims-Walker and RB Maurice Jones-Drew, are questionable because of an ankle and an abdomen, respectively. Sims-Walker didn’t play last week because of his high ankle sprain, so it’s a bit surprising that he practiced at all this week (high ankle sprains tend to keep players out at least three to four weeks). Sims-Walker was limited Thursday and Friday, which tells us one of two things – either he’s an unbelievably fast healer or coach Jack Del Rio is using a bit of gamesmanship to keep New York guessing.

Jones-Drew has been on fire recently – he’s accumulated 368 yards and three touchdowns in his past three games (he’s also added 123 receiving yards) – and he’s more likely to play than not. If not, look for Rashad Jennings to get more opportunities.

Though he’s been awfully entertaining on his Twitter account since he was admitted to the hospital with back pain (he was released from the hospital Saturday morning), New York G Shawn Andrews is doubtful (Will Beatty will take his place). CB Will Blackmon is questionable with a chest injury.

Steelers at Bills


Once again, LB Shawne Merriman (who still hasn’t played a game since signing with Buffalo) is out with an Achilles tendon injury. RB C.J. Spiller is questionable, but considering Fred Jackson (249 yards, three touchdowns) has been so good the past two games, Spiller’s absence shouldn’t have a huge impact on the offense (special teams might be a different story, though). The team doesn’t want to play Spiller until he’s 100 percent healthy, which he almost surely is not.

Pittsburgh only has four players on the injury report – WR Antonio Brown and DE Aaron Smith are out, TE Matt Spaeth (concussion) is doubtful and S Troy Polamalu (ankle) is questionable. Polamalu most likely will play. He played last week despite the injury, and the Steelers plan was to rest him early in the week and let him play Sunday (he was limited Wednesday and Thursday but had full participation in practice Friday).

Titans at Texans

If you formed a flag football team just out of the players that are listed as probable on Houston’s injury report, you’d have a pretty good chance to win an intramural title. Those players include QB Matt Schaub, WR Andre Johnson, LB Brian Cushing and DE Mario Williams. Unfortunately for your beer-league dream team, all will be playing NFL football Sunday.

For Tennessee, Randy Moss still isn’t listed on the injury report, which confuses me. If he’s active and playing, how come nobody is throwing him the ball? If he was hurt, then it would make sense. Speaking of players who don’t throw the ball to Moss, backup QB Kerry Collins – who will be the starter once again at some point – is questionable. But rookie Rusty Smith still is slated to the start at QB.

Also for the Titans, DT Jason Jones is questionable with a knee injury. DT Tony Brown (knee) also is questionable, but he’s more likely to play.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .
Posted on: November 21, 2010 3:10 pm
 

Derrick Mason reaches 900

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

With his third catch of the game today, Ravens WR Derrick Mason became only the 13th player in NFL history to surpass the 900-career receptions mark.

Next on the all-time list is Torry Holt (920) at No. 12, but Mason has a ways to go before he would catch No. 1 Jerry Rice (1,549).

By the way, five of the top-13 pass-catchers of all time are still playing. That includes Terrell Owens, Tony Gonzalez, Randy Moss and Hines Ward.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .

Posted on: November 21, 2010 10:30 am
Edited on: November 21, 2010 11:21 am
 

Report: Portis starting; Landry, Rogers out

Posted by Will Brinson

The already suspect Redskins secondary (you may recall something last week about giving up passing yards to this Michael Vick fella) will be hurting even more on Sunday, as both LaRon Landry and Carlos Rogers are out for Washington's game in Tennessee.

Chris Johnson is the biggest gamechanger for the Titans, of course, but this could mean a big day for Vince Young and possibly result in Randy Moss finally getting on track with his new(est) team.

For the Redskins offense, they'll be missing Ryan Torain but Clinton Portis will reportedly (according to Adam Schefter of ESPN) return to the field and make a start for Washington.

Chris Russell of ESPN 980 in D.C. says the decision for Landry and Rogers to sit was made "much earlier in the week than yesterday" but kept secret in order to maintain a competitive advantage for Washington.

But a quick in team passing defenses for the season shows that for Washington -- who ranks next-to-last in the NFL, ahead of only the matador-like Houston Texans -- it really might not matter who they put back there.

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Posted on: November 19, 2010 4:22 pm
Edited on: November 19, 2010 4:29 pm
 

Sidney Rice decides to play

Posted by Andy BenoitS. Rice (US Presswire)

Vikings head coach Brad Childress gave wide receiver Sidney Rice an ultimatum: either play this week or be shut down for the remainder of the season. The fourth-year wideout has decided to play.

Just prior to the season, Rice presumably irked the Vikings by undergoing hip surgery after deciding that he could not fight through the nagging injury. He was placed on PUP and has not been of service to the team all season.

Some have speculated that Rice’s surgery was a negotiating ploy (he’s looking for a new contract). That is illogical, though, as teams generally aren’t encouraged to pay big money to players who prove they can’t consistently take the field. Where the contract situation may have come into play was in Rice’s decision to suit up in 2010 (again, it’s hard to ask for a new contract when you’re not playing). If anything, Rice needs to play in order to shed his reputation for being lazy and content. (This isn't to say he IS lazy and content -- more than a few critics, including Cris Carter, have suggested this, though.)

Rice’s absence doomed the Viking offense from Day One (though a shoddy front line maybe would have ultimately doomed it anyway). The trade for Greg Camarillo has not filled the void at receiver. And, you may have heard, the trade for Randy Moss was not very successful.

So now Brett Favre has his favorite downfield target back. But after being on the shelf for some three months, will that downfield target be viable? And, with the Vikings now 3-6, does it even matter?

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Posted on: November 17, 2010 11:08 am
 

Could Sidney Rice miss the remainder of 2010?

Posted by Will Brinson

The short answer to the question of Sidney Rice missing the rest of the year: YES. The long answer, well, that's a bit more complicated, thanks to myriad reasons.

Anyway, Judd Zulgad and Chip Scoggins of the Minnesota Star-Tribune point out that the Vikes have a week from Wednesday to activate Rice from the Physically Unable to Perform list, or else he'll be required to remain on the list and miss the remainder of 2010.

It seemed like Rice might play on Sunday when Minnesota lost to Chicago (even if it was only 30 snaps, as Brad Childress had previously mentioned), but he didn't and that's on Rice, who will make the ultimate decision about whether he's healthy enough to go.

There's just a couple of issues there, however -- because Rice is coming off hip surgery, he has a perfectly legitimate excuse for "not being right." But there was some controversy about the surgery in the first place, because some folks believed it's timing belied Rice's unhappiness with not receiving a new contract from Minnesota. If he and agent Drew Rosenhaus believe that the Vikings won't offer more money any time soon, it's entirely plausible that Rice's decision on his health could be influenced by such factors.

The wideout's leverage in negotiations has also increased recently, with the departure of Randy Moss to the Titans and the resulting promotion of Hank Baskett and Bernard Berrian on the depth chart. Yes, Percy Harvin is immensely talented and a key piece to the future of the Vikes' offense, but combining him and Rice would make things easier for whoever replaces Brett Favre (via trade, draft or default to Tavaris Jackson) and Brad Childress next year.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com