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Tag:Ron Artest
Posted on: December 17, 2010 9:55 am
 

Shootaround 12.17.10: Charging to a victory

Posted by Royce Young
  • Rob Mahoney for the NYT on the style of rebounding: "Still, the problem lies in the assessment of rebounding style. We know that Griffin and Love approach their work on the boards differently, but that knowledge doesn’t really informs the way we think about rebounding. While style in itself is one of the game’s marvels, its capital value lies in how it affects function. Put another way: we know that Griffin and Love are different breeds of rebounder, but we should strive to understand the fundamental meaning and nature of that difference."
  • Lee Jenkins of SI with a terrific profile of Kevin Love: "Rebounding is half blood sport, half science. If a shot rises from the right wing, Love bolts to the left, in search of the low block on the weak side, which he straddles as though he's barricading his front door. His knees are bent, his back straight, his shoulder blades pushing into the chest of whoever is unfortunate enough to be stuck behind him. He turns his head to track the flight of the ball, gauging trajectory like a centerfielder. A low liner will smack straight against the rim. A high archer will bounce around awhile. A three-pointer could carom all the way to the elbow. A floater might not reach the charge circle. He considers the shooter. One teammate, forward Michael Beasley, tends to miss off the back rim, so Love braces for a long rebound. Another, center Darko Milicic, usually misses off the front, so he tries for a tip-in."
  • Ron Artest to the Indy Star on leaving Indiana: "A coward, I was a coward,'' Artest said before Wednesday night's game between the Los Angeles Lakers and the Pacers. "When you do coward stuff, you feel like a coward. I don't care if it was done intentionally or by mistake, you're still a coward. I don't care how young I was. That's not an excuse.''
  • 48 Minutes of Hell on Manu: "Manu Ginobili is not a basketball player. He’s an exhibitionist. And so far this this season what he is showing-off is worthy of MVP consideration. For the second consecutive game, Ginobili push the Spurs to victory with ballsy, buzzer-beating heroics. Wednesday Ginobili fueled the Spurs with a spectacular, legal-upon-review step back jump shot. But that was just a tease. What Manu Ginobili did last night we’ll never see again."
  • Denver Stiffs Manu's charge: "While I give the Spurs credit for climbing back in to the game after the Nuggets were up by 12 at one point in the first half, the way this "win" was "awarded" to them was nothing short of highway robbery. Regardless of where you come down on the charging issue, the fact that for maybe the first time in recorded NBA history a game winning shot was nullified by a charging call. In the 25 years I've been watching basketball I have NEVER seen this. Ever. Carmelo Anthony deserved much better."
  • I honestly don't see you DON'T call a charge in that situation. If that's what it was, then that's what it was. Taking a charge is a defensive play, just like stealing the ball or blocking a shot. It's smart. It's heady. And if it's a charge in the middle of the second quarter, why can't it be a charge with 0.4 seconds left?
Posted on: December 8, 2010 1:51 pm
Edited on: December 8, 2010 1:52 pm
 

Artest to donate half his salary to mental health

Posted by Royce Young

I keep telling you guys, Ron Artest is awesome.

Over the summer, he pledged to sell his NBA championship ring in support of mental health awareness. And the ring is set to be sold on Christmas day. Artest has struggled with that during his career and saw how counseling had an incredibly positive impact on him. So naturally, he's doing his part to get the message out and raise awareness. And the ring's a pretty darn good start.

But Artest isn't done. No way. This isn't Ron Artest we're talking here. So on top of the ring, Artest told Scott Howard-Cooper of NBA.com that he intends to donate half of his $6.79 million salary to mental health awareness.

“I’m definitely considering the whole thing,” Artest said. “Or maybe 60 percent.”

Although he may not finalize details until the summer, he called the plan “very serious. I’ve talked to my wife about it already. It’s a powerful message. The message is about the inspiration. That’s what I want, to inspire people. People will be like, ‘Wow. Why is he doing this? Oh, that’s why. Wow. We need to help educate.’ I didn’t come [to the Lakers] for the money. Obviously I could have gone somewhere else, even a lesser market. Pay less taxes. The taxes here are freaking killing me, you know what I’m saying?”

Yeah taxes are rough. But how about those tax cuts! (OK, not going there.) Clearly though, this isn't just about the tax break. It's about sending a message and one Artest is putting across pretty loudly.

Artest told Howard-Cooper he considered doing this in 2006-07, his first full season with the Kings, but his manager talked him out of it. But at that time, he didn't have a charity in mind. He just planned on donating the salary towards college and high school hoops scholarships. Artest said he was prepared at the time to move into an apartment with his family if money became a problem.

I don't know what else to say. Artest has undergone just about the wildest public relations transformation ever.  From the brawl at The Palace, to the NBA's bad boy, to now being such a charitable person that also does things like call radio shows and pretend to be Luis Scola. He's gone from hated to unbelievably endearing. Only Ron Artest.

Artest has come a long way in his NBA career. And he's putting his money where his mouth is to try and show it. Hats off to him.
Category: NBA
Posted on: December 2, 2010 1:08 pm
Edited on: December 8, 2010 1:49 pm
 

Ron Artest calls Houston radio show as Luis Scola

Posted by Royce Young

I started to list out all the things Ron Artest has done over the past few years to try and illustrate how crazy awesome he is. That list got long fast. So instead of trying and compile it, just know that his most recent stunt is definitely ranked highly on the list.

Following the Lakers loss to the Rockets Wednesday night, Artest called in to a Houston postgame show (click the link to listen). Not to defend himself or to talk about the game. Nah, he just wanted to pretend to be Luis Scola.

Artest used a really weak accent that went in and out and just seemed to try and talk faster to imitate Scola. But here's a few of the best things he said:
  • “I think I’m the best player in the world and no one can stop me. I feel like I’m like Shaq. I feel like I’m the best.”
  • "I feel like I am the best around, in the world. You see the guys that couldn’t even hold me. They tried guarding me and they couldn’t. I just had the hook shot — that right hook shot — they can't stop it.”
  • When Chuck Hayes was mentioned: "Actually Chuck Wagon he didn’t play with any boxers on today. He said he wanted to play and just play hard. He had nooo boxers on tonight. No Spandex. He play freeballing. So he was a warrior tonight and we won it. The Rockets are back.”
  • When asked how he'll celebrate the win: "I’ll celebrate, just go eat some Spanish food. And, uh, just eat Spanish food, I think.”
Artest played with Scola and the Rockets before he signed with the Lakers before last season. So obviously he's got pre-existing relationships with Scola and Hayes and a bunch of those guys. And probably the postgame host too.

I love players that don't take things too seriously so as you might imagine, I enjoy Ron Artest very much. I'm ready for him to release a video imitating every player in the NBA. I would imagine his Timofey Mozgov is SPOT ON.

Via Deadspin

Posted on: November 23, 2010 8:04 am
Edited on: August 14, 2011 9:01 pm
 

Shootaround: 11.23.10: 99% likely to fail

Vince Carter comes up lame, the Miami Heat are struggling, a few New York Knicks analyzed, Steve Francis heads abroad, and a whole lot more. Posted by Ben Golliver

  • Orlando Magic wing Vince Carter went down during Monday night's game against the San Antonio Spurs and told reporters after the game that he he felt "sharp pain go through my knee, under the kneecap." That doesn't sound good. 
  • Here's the stat of the night for you from Miami's surprising double-digit home loss to the Indiana Pacers: "The Heat bench played a total of 74 minutes on Monday night and scored a whopping 4 points. The last time they did that? Nearly a decade ago, when the Heat bench mustered only two points in a January 2001 loss against -- guess who -- the Indiana Pacers." 
  • Kevin Pelton shows some love for New York Knicks rookie Landry Fields. "This year's standout has been New York Knicks guard Landry Fields, who has excelled as a starter from opening night. Fields' polished game was no secret among Pac-10 fans, but he got little national hype because he played for an undermanned Stanford team that finished tied for eighth in the conference. Fields has exceeded even his collegiate performance, especially on the glass. He's grabbing 20.6 percent of available defensive rebounds, which is phenomenal for a shooting guard (the average for the position is 11.0 percent) and nearly identical to his defensive rebound percentage as a senior in college."
  • Pacers blog IndyCornrows.com isn't nearly as excited about the win over the Miami Heat as you might expect. "Jim O’Brien urged that they caught Miami on an off night, saying it could be fool’s gold. While the possibility exists, O’Brien will always speak cautiously. O'Brien sips his glass half empty to not allow his team to gain complacency, it was more than fool’s gold: it was a stout defensive effort by the Pacers. Words have been expressed more often to give credence to the team’s defensive efforts, but tonight featured a culmination that resulted in not only a solid road victory, but a definitive win, led by a trio of much maligned Pacer members."
  • Isiah Thomas is at it again, talking about his sexual harassment case and overdose on sleeping medication.
  • These NBA labor negotiations sound like they are off to a great start. Not. Union chief Billy Hunter says a lockout next season is 99% likely to occur and goes on to say everything is working as it's supposed to, with the NBA generating profits at a solid clip. "Our contention is that the system that was put in place delivered everything it was supposed to deliver,” Hunter said, referring to the initial framework adopted in 1999. “The players never got a cent more than they were supposed to get. And ironically, if you review the press clippings from that era, you will see that the deals that were struck were lauded by the N.B.A. as having been major successes for the owners. So why now at this stage are we now saying that the system doesn’t work and it’s got to be overhauled?”
Posted on: November 8, 2010 9:23 am
Edited on: November 8, 2010 12:10 pm
 

Shootaround 11.8.10: Right and Wrong

J.O.'s knee not quite right, Kevin Garnett not quite wrong in the head, and a murder suspect busted in Charlotte, all in today's Shootaround.Posted by Matt Moore
  • Oh, those sneaky Celtics. It seems they snuck a Jermaine O'Neal surgery under our very noses . J.O. certainly has seemed a step behind in terms of explosiveness and strength in the paint. But to be honest, we just chalked it up to age. Apparently there was an actual reason, which means he could improve, which means the Celtics could get stronger, which is just terrifying.
  • A Minnesotan discussion of Kevin Garnett's behavior, in which it's argued he's the most genuine athlete alive . I'm not buying it. Garnett isn't driven to these things out of passion, they're calculated maneuvers. That's why he doesn't end up in fights, instead walking away with his hands up after starting something. Intense, sure, but just as deliberate as the outraged opera star on stage.
  • A murder suspect was captured in the VIP section of the Bobcats game against Orlando Saturday. Seriously. Pretty scary because there were so many people around in the public event. Pretty funny because of all the jokes you can make of "Well, if you want to be hidden from people..."
  • Brandon Jennings with some disturbing comments about the locker room chemistry in Milwaukee that's helped lead to the 2-5 start they're off to. Jennings is still learning how to be a vocal leader, but he needs to take the step and say to his teammates what he's telling the press.
Posted on: November 4, 2010 1:38 pm
Edited on: November 4, 2010 1:49 pm
 

Bynum will start when he gets back

Posted by Matt Moore

Andrew Bynum should be back soon. No, really. Quit looking at us like that. He's seriously on track this time. It's different this time! Honest!

Anyway, the question is, with Lamar Odom playing lights out, and the Lakers, you know, destroying everything in their path, Will Bynum start when he returns? Well, it would interrupt chemistry, and Odom's definitely earned the minutes, and you don't fix it if it's not broken, so naturally yes! He will start when he gets back. From ESPNLA :
"We like what we see from these five guys [in the starting lineup]; however, there are extenuating circumstances with Drew," Lakers head coach Phil Jackson said. "He has a knee that [puts him] in a situation [where] he's got to get himself prepped before a ballgame. He wears a brace because of it and, as a consequence, once he's warmed up you hate to have a guy sit down for 15 minutes and cool off and have to start all over again."
So thanks for everything, Lamar, but we kind of need Bynum to keep that knee warmed up for the ten to fifteen minutes he's available.

I'm kidding, of course, it's a reasonable approach, and besides, Odom's never chafed at coming off the bench. This team is deep enough, they could have a gigantic asteroid smash through their chemistry and still beat most opponents by 15. That's how good this Lakers team is. And when Bynum gets back, they'll be even better.
Posted on: October 27, 2010 11:55 am
 

Lakers Ring Ceremony: A visual retrospective

Lakers receive diamond-drenched rings to celebrate championship, fifth for Kobe Bryant.
Posted by Matt Moore

It was a sweet set of memories, each more delicate than the last. A team, brought together by fate, forged in the fires of comradery, celebrating their triumphant... okay, that's enough of that. So the Lakers got their rings last night in what was really a pretty cool little ceremony where they all introduced one another. Here's what happened, in a set of images to last a lifetime.











Posted on: October 25, 2010 5:19 pm
Edited on: October 25, 2010 7:23 pm
 

The Laker Manifesto

This is the way your season ends. This is the way your season ends. This is the way your season ends. Not with a burn, but in gold. Posted by Matt Moore



You see that?

That's theirs. It was theirs last year. It's theirs this year -- tomorrow night, actually . And unless Boston figures a way to play better and stay healthy, or the Triad is actually as good as advertised , then it'll be theirs again this year. They are that good. They are that strong, that experienced, that focused and that deep. But most of all? They're that good.

And here's how it will happen.

This locker room, from all indications, is not unlike your typical successful business office. It's not a monkey bars meet-up like Oklahoma City, nor is it some sort of Reservoir Dogs luncheon like what I experienced in the Heat locker room. It's just like a succesful office. Guys hang around the water cooler, yucking it up about Monday Night Football or the obnoxious dude down the hall. There's a comfortable familiarity, everyone knows each other and Christmas parties are a blast. Everyone gets along, outside of the Slovenian dude who keeps blasting Drake at high volume on Fridays and can't figure out how to work the printer. Someone brings doughnuts, the kitchen's usually pretty clean, everyone pulls their weight, and the chatter about Glee is both in-depth and hilarious.

And everyone's afraid for their jobs except the two guys with corner offices.

There's a level of excellence demanded of this team, and it starts and stops with Phil Jackson and Kobe Bryant. That mindset -- the professional, hyper-achieving without sacrificing the mind concept -- is what permeates. It makes the team disciplined and proficient, and it makes most of its players terrified of the day when they slip up in front of the bosses. You will not fail, because Bryant and Jackson will not allow you to fail.

The Triangle really isn't the right fit for most of this team. That's not only pretty certain, it's painfully obvious. Shannon Brown, when released from the shackles, looks like a dynamic, powerful, well-intentioned guard. Within its confines, he's like an ADD kid trying to sit through The English Patient . Lamar Odom? Everything he does is largely outside of the triangular box, filling in the gaps and playing loose within the margins. The only players that really benefit from the system are Kobe, Pau Gasol and Derek Fisher. Phil Jackson does too, of course. Because Jackson doesn't have to spend the time running out variation upon variation. It exists upon itself and all he has to do is teach it right. This isn't because he's lazy, far from it. It allows him to work on what is most important. Getting their minds and souls in the best place to compete. Sometimes that means kicking the dog down the stairs and to New Jersey to play backup point guard. And sometimes that means questioning the player in the press in order to get him to have the best run of his career, like Ron Artest. It's a balance that allows for focus.

Are there questions? Sure.

Starting and ending with Bryant's knee. It's not 100%, not close to it. But the man won a title with nine fingers and 1.5 knees. So I wouldn't let your breath out when he has the ball, kiddos. If there's one thing Bryant's shown, it's that he adapts. Constantly. Growing a post-game, grinding out the mid-range jumper, bombing from downtown. He'll do what the team needs, what he needs. There's no quit in Mamba, but there is a gigantic set of fangs.

Also, this team coasts. For days and weeks. Long stretches when they simply could not care less. Lazy passes, weak defense, a lack of hustle that would put Jerome James to shame. They know they don't have to care, and they don't. To the point where it's entirely possible they won't have the top seed in the West, depending on whether the team stays healthy. But they'll be there, and that's all they need.

The team relies on an absurd level of talent. While people scoff, cough and vomit towards the Triad in Miami, the Lakers employ two Hall-of-Famers, three quality starters (at least for the two weeks Fisher is awesome per year), a talented, if oft-injured, legitimate center in a league that doesn't feature many. Matt Barnes and Steve Blake, starters on other teams, are the seventh and eighth men on this one. It's a team loaded for any opportunity and its personnel fits its needs. Blake can spot up and run the offense (to the degree the Triangle needs running from the point). Barnes plays defense and will basically be a poor man's Odom. And the starting unit is so loaded, it doesn't matter.

Gasol may shoulder more of the load this year, and that's fine, since many considered him the best big in the league last year. That fadeaway touch jumper from the mid-block? You can't stop it. Usually, the only thing keeping Gasol from posting huge numbers is his comrade in arms taking jumpers.

And Kobe will shoot. That's who he is and his ego won't let him do anything else. He'll fire until there are no more bullets left. Then he'll throw the gun. No other player so often garners condemnation for his shot selection, then completely backs it up by nailing the game winner. He'll put his team in a position to lose by firing off-balance J after off-balance J, then hit the running game winner and come off smelling like roses. He played horribly in Game 7 of the Finals and still came off the hero. Because for all the misses, he's still the guy you want shooting and still the guy that can drop 50 if things go his way.

Fisher is a massive liability at both ends of the floor ... until he's not. Bynum is a half-player that cannot be relied on to make the tough play ... until he does. And no player better symbolizes the kind of transformation wearing the yellow and purple can have on you more than Ron Artest. From Crazy Pills to mental health spokesman, gunner without a conscience to brilliant complementary player, from loose cannon to lovable winner. This is what L.A. can do for you, what Staples Center and Lawrence Tanter can do for you, what the gold of a championship team can do for you.

And it will do it again.

Get excited about Miami's superstar power. Get riled up about Boston's defense, or the seemingly endless wave of up-and-comers. But know this.

Tomorrow night, the reigning champions will receive their rings, the second of three they intend to get. They have the pieces, they have the board, they have the plan, they have the manifesto, they have the leaders.

Now all they need is the game.


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com