Play Fantasy The Most Award Winning Fantasy game with real time scoring, top expert analysis, custom settings, and more. Play Now
 
Tag:Paul Pierce
Posted on: October 31, 2010 9:51 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 8:20 pm
 

Shaq wins best NBA Halloween costume picture

Pictures of the best Halloween costumes from around the NBA this year. Posted by Ben Golliver When it's not enforcing a dress code, tightening up the technical foul rules or threatening contraction, the NBA can be a pretty fun place. This year, players, mascots, cheerleaders and fans all got into the Halloween spirit, dressing up before, during and after games.  NBA stars like Dwyane Wade, Paul Pierce, Rajon Rondo and Shaquille O'Neal got into the act, and Shaq easily takes home top honors for his bold attempt at cross-dressing as "Shaqueeta."  Let's have a look. dwyane-wade-justin-timberlake-halloween Miami Heat star guard Dwyane Wade dresses up as Justin Timberlake, white face and all. Via I Am Black Bobby's Tumblr . al-horford-kanye-west Atlanta Hawks forward Al Horford dressed up as Kanye West. Via Al Horford's Twitter . zaza-pachulia-charlie-chaplin Horford's teammate, Atlanta Hawks center Zaza Pachulia, dresses up as Charlie Chaplin. Via Horford's Twitter . halloween-nba This couple is really enjoying the Los Angeles Clippers game. Via Getty. kardashians-halloween-nba Kim Kardashian and a friend dress up (I think they are dressing up?) while watching the Miami Heat take on the New Jersey Nets. Via Getty. nba-fan-halloween One Clipper fan decided to dress up as owner Donald Sterling. Rimshot! Via Getty. elizabeth-banks Actress Elizabeth Banks dresses up as a cat as she takes in Friday night's game between the Portland Trail Blazers and New York Knicks, along with Tracy Morgan and Russell Simmons. Via Getty. halloween-nba The Los Angeles Clippers cheerleaders went all out. Via Getty. toronto-raptors-mascot As did the Toronto Raptors cheerleaders, who are put through their paces by the Raptors mascot. Via Getty. brook-lopez-halloween-nba Brook Lopez, center for the New Jersey Nets, wore black and orange shoes during his Halloween day game against the Miami Heat. Via @Jose3030 on Twitter . rockets-mascot-halloween-nba The Houston Rockets mascot poses with fans dressed up in the Halloween spirit. Via Getty. boston-celtics-halloween-costumes The Boston Celtics goof it up, with wing Paul Pierce, guard Ray Allen and company all decked out. Via Paul Pierce's Twitter. boston-celtics-halloween Here's another Boston Celtics team shot. This one includes point guard Rajon Rondo as an injured Tiger Woods. Via Paul Pierce's Twitter. shaqueeta-shaq-halloween

Last but not least, here is cross-dressing Boston Celtics center Shaquille "Shaqueeta" O'Neal, who crosses every line of decency in the process. Via Shaq's Twitter.
Posted on: October 30, 2010 12:06 am
Edited on: October 30, 2010 12:07 am
 

Rajon Rondo is making some history early on

Posted by Royce Young

Friday night against the New York Knicks, Rajon Rondo scored 10 points. He also grabbed 10 rebounds. And wouldn't you know it, he put up double-digit assists too, notching a triple-double. But this wasn't any triple-double. This was a history-making triple-double.

In Boston's 105-101 over the Knicks, Rondo dished out 24 assists tying the record for most assists ever in a triple-double. (He tied Isiah Thomas whose came in a double-overtime game.) Oh, and on top of that, he also tied the record for most assists after three games in history with 50. Fifty. FIFTY assists. Through three games, Rondo is averaging 16.6 assists per game. That's like good or something.

In Friday's game, here's how his assists lined up: 12 led to baskets at the rim, two to shots 10 feet or closer, one 10-15, five from 16-23 (hello Kevin Garnett pick-and-pop) and four to 3-pointers. Rondo distributed the ball far and wide like a quarterback finding multiple receivers on a big day.

Garnett told reporters after the game, "Sometimes he’ll see something that you don’t see and he’ll make you see it." I think that's a fairly tremendous way of describing a playmaker like Rondo. Similar to a great quarterback throwing a wide receiver open (two football references in one post!). I love that expression.

Rondo is off to a fairly fantastic start with 17 assists in game one, nine in game two and then 24 in the third game. Some are making the case that Rondo might be the best point guard in the league and while that's of course debatable, he's at least worth talking about. Obviously it's fortuitous for Rondo that he happens to be able to dish primarily to Paul Pierce, Ray Allen and Garnett, three future Hall of Famers, but Rondo is key in getting them their open looks.

We're just three games in, but Rondo is already putting a historical stamp on this season. He won't keep the pace for the entire 82, but for now, looking at 16.6 apg is pretty fun.
Posted on: October 27, 2010 2:34 am
Edited on: October 27, 2010 11:40 am
 

Heat become Cavaliers II against Celtics

We break down how the Heat's spacing failed and how the Celtics' defense made LeBron James settle, frame by frame.
Posted by Matt Moore


It was supposed to be different, right from the start. Even with the newness, it wasn't supposed to look or feel like last year. But with his team down to a superior defensive team on the road, and struggling offensively, it was just as it's always been . LeBron James had to take over, had to run point, had to do everything, leading to a defensive adjustment to shut him down and another struggling result. Part of the reason? Too often poor spacing on the part of the Heat, a hallmark for his Cleveland teams on offense, lead to James taking ridiculous contested shots.

Like, oh, say this one.

ENTER THE DRAGON. WITH HIS HEAD DOWN.




James dribbles up court and this is what he meets. Four defenders all out to meet him. They're not concerned with his screen man, they're not concerned with his shooters, they'e just eyeing James. Any attempt to reset this offense and stretch things out might improve spacing, but then again, the Celtics have been killing the Heat with their abilty to cover the entire floor all night. James elects to try and make something happen.

I THINK THEY ARE ON TO YOUR CLEVER RUSE.




As James come off the screen, you'll notice there are four Heat players within ten feet of each other, all at the top of the key. Pierce spins around his screen man, abandoning him to stay in front of James on the drive. James rolls high but doesn't attack the wing, instead, pausing at the top. As you see here, there is now a complete green wall between him and the basket and the lone shooter in the corner, Wade, is meaningless, and his defender, Ray Allen, knows it, leaving him relatively open. The ball's not coming to him.

SURE, THIS IS A GOOD IDEA.



James' roll man just stops, not rolling baseline to where you'll notice, THERE IS NO ONE, and just stands there. Three Celtics defenders are waiting on him and if he tries to spot up, they'll be right there to contest. James elects to rise and fire. But hey, it's an eight point game and he's the best player in basketball. Surely this ends well.

OH.



Well, then, at least you didn't leave 16 seconds on the clock you could have used to get a better shot in a three-possession game and you had rebounders. Or, you didn't. Bosh fails to grab the loose ball, and it goes out on him, Celtics get the ball up 8 with 1:58 to go.

Rough.

Don't get me wrong, there were several insane-o moves from James all night. (See 1:58 in this clip for reference .) But the same problems exist and when you don't have spacing and you don't have guys that will knock down shots, you're in trouble. And players like Eddie House weren't knocking down anything down anywhere. Here's House's shot chart from our CBSSports.com Game Tracker :



When that's your help? You're not in good shape. But half the time, they weren't even getting to that point, as constantly the Celtics turned the Heat into a one-man show. And while James is simply good enough to make you pay some of the time, it's not a sustainable strategy . And that's what you have to have against the Celtics, that's what you have to have in the playoffs. A strategy and scheme that will fail a lower percentage of the time on average than it will succeed. There's no Magic formula of talent that will overcome the percentages the Celtics make you play with bad shots, contested, in bad situations.

This was because the Heat haven't played together. It's because they need to learn one another. It's because Wade was rusty as all get out and the team was nervous. But it was also because the Heat played right into the Celtics' hands. And that's why they walked away losers on their hyped debut.

For more on the game, check out Ken Berger's discussion of how far the Heat are from the glitter and lights of their formation, live from Boston.

Posted on: October 27, 2010 12:44 am
Edited on: October 27, 2010 10:54 am
 

Video: Wade, James speak after Heat loss

Video: Wade, James speak about loss to Celtics in season opener after poor shooting performance.
Posted by Matt Moore

Well, if the first game is any indication, Phil Jackson, Michael Jordan, and those Bulls can put the champagne on ice. The Celtics dismantled the Big 3 on Tuesday night to start the much-hyped team off to a rocky start. For the Celtics, it was business as usual, holding the Heat defensively to abysmal numbers and getting easy buckets at will. A late comeback was for naught, and now the Heat get another new experience. Explaining losses for a team that's never supposed to lose due to their talent. CBSSports.com was there and in this video, we get Dwyane Wade and LeBron James' comments on the loss.




Posted on: October 8, 2010 3:15 pm
 

The new technical rules are being enforced

Posted by Royce Young

The NBA said it was serious about implementing new technical foul rules. There's now a "respect for the game" clause and the whistle will be much shorter for player.

And we're already getting a good look at it in just a handful of preseason games. So far, they're definitely serious.

There's Grant Hill and Reggie Evans getting tossed for patting each other on the backsides. There's a lot of players like D.J. Augustin who got hit with one for a mild protest during Wednesday's game against the Thunder. And then there's last night's affair where three Celtics were nailed with the big whistle.

Paul Pierce, Von Wafer and Nate Robinson were all assesed technical fouls in last night's win over the Nets. Pierce got tabbed when he took exception by throwing a fist in the air after teammate Rajon Rondo went hard to the floor with no whistle. According to the Boston Globe, official Steve Javie tried to stop Pierce, but it was too late.

“I didn’t realize,’’ Pierce told the paper. “Steve Javie was like, ‘That’s the new rule.’ I was like, ‘Dang.’ But I mean, it’s something that a lot of players are going to get early technicals, but they’ll make the adjustment." 

Robinson was nailed under similar cirumstances and Wafer picked up what's already his second technical for a small protest. 

The new rules say this:

"Players making aggressive gestures, such as air punches, anywhere on the court. Demonstrative disagreement, such as when a player incredulously raises his hands, or smacks his own arm to demonstrate how he was fouled. Running directly at an official to complain about a call. Excessive inquiries about a call, even in a civilized tone.

"In addition, referees have been instructed to consider calling technicals on players who use body language to question or demonstrate displeasure, or say things like, 'Come on!' They can also consider technicals for players who 'take the long path to the official,' walking across the court to make their case."

The league tried a crackdown similar to this in 2006, but it didn't last long after players just couldn't adjust. And thus far, though it is just a few games into preseason, it looks like players are having a difficult time again. Basketball is a high speed game played with a lot of emotion. And sometimes, like in Pierce's case, you react without even really thinking. It's easier said than done to keep those emotions in check.

Posted on: September 22, 2010 5:00 pm
Edited on: September 22, 2010 7:16 pm
 

Pop Quiz: Are the Celtics too old?

Posted by Matt Moore

Fall is here, hear the yell, back to school, ring the bell ... The NBA season is right around the corner, and NBA training camp starts in just a few short weeks. To get you ready for the NBA season, we've put together 25 pop quizzes. Pencils ready? We continue our Pop Quizzes with this question...

Are the Celtics too old to win the title?


Too old for what? I suppose that's the real question here. Too old to win the East? Probably not. Too old to get homecourt advantage? Surely not. Too old to win the title?

That's a tough one. 

Let me take you back to a year ago. The Celtics began the season trying to regain their pride after a loss to the then-surprising Magic in the Eastern Conference Semifinals. And to be honest? They didn't look very convincing, even on their winning streak as they cruised to the division title. In key games, Garnett looked slow. They lost to a Kobe buzzer-beater. Even when they later got revenge for that game, it seemed to set a tone. And that was before the second half, where they looked terrible. Every Boston fan on the planet will tell you that it was just a lack of resolve, a sense of boredom, and that those games simply didn't matter to them, so their effort wasn't there. That's probably partially true. It's also partially true that even bored the Celtics should have beaten the Nets and beaten them easily in every game they played. There were problems for Boston. Tons of them. Most notably, they were swept by the Hawks, and each time it was a late run by the Hawks featuring the transition game that did them in. The Celtics simply couldn't run with them. Everyone put a plug in them, except their fans, a handful of media, and Nate Jones. 

And then the playoffs came, and all of that thought process went out the window.

The San Antonio Spurs throughout the years had drifted and coasted to second half finishes, and yet always seemed to find themselves there at the end for years. But there was no precedent for the rope-a-dope the Celtics seemingly pulled last year. Even the first few games against Miami in the first round seemed close. But then Kevin Garnett got into a fight which lead to a suspension, and from there on out, the Celtics destroyed everyone when they needed to when they came across them, all the way up until the 4th quarter of Game 7 against LA. The pitbulls had regained control of the pack, and everyone that said Boston only lost to the Magic due to Garnett's injury in 2009 was vindicated. 

That was last year. The Celtics are now a year older. Ray Allen is 35, Garnett 34, Pierce 33. They added two centers who long ago left the comfort of 30. Rajon Rondo is still young and chipper, alongside Glen Davis and Nate Robinson. But they put on a lot of miles the last two years, which will add to the fatigue factor. 

But then, Shaquille O'Neal says that old teams win titles. Which is pretty on par. Experience matters in this league, and the Celtics have a world of it. 

How old are the Celtics in comparison to other title teams? Since 2004-2005, championship team starters averaged to be 27.4 years old. The oldest were naturally the Spurs in 2007. Their starting five in the Finals that year began the season at an average age of 30.6 years old. The Celtics enter this season at 30.2 years old if we project Kendrick Perkins as the starter for a theoretical Finals and 32.8 if we go with Shaquille O'Neal, the probably opening night starter. The Celtics, in essence, are trying to be the second oldest team since 2004 to win the title. It's relatively easy to argue that the competition is greater now than it was in 2007, with the Pau-Gasol-era Lakers, the Heat, and the Magic in play, but those are the numbers. 

So what's the answer? In case you haven't been able to tell, this is simply not a quiz with a correct answer. If you are to make the case that the Celtics have finally reached the threshold where wisdom becomes physical limitation, you're probably on par. We saw signs of it last year, the Celtics just showed a remarkable amount of grit in powering through it and committing to the team concept (again). If you were to make the case that the Celtics are nowhere near done, not after last year's performance, who could argue with you?

And that's where we hit the Heat. 

Of course.

The Heat are going to be the antithesis for the Celtics this season, and in a lot of ways they are polar opposites. The Celtics rely on players that are very clearly defined in their roles (Rondo is the point guard, distributer, floor general. Garnett the defensive motivational speaker. Pierce is the go-to scorer. Allen is the perimeter marksman, etc.). The Heat have a nebulous lineup that may end up featuring a super freak small forward at point guard and their starting center is an inexperienced Canadian who is 6'9'' (Perkins is 6'10''). The Celtics are committed to a defensive philosophy of sacrifice and communication. The Heat are betting heavily on overwhelming opponents with skill and ability. The Celtics are primarily an old team. The Heat are primarily a mid-20's team. The Celtics have experience. The Heat are inexperie....wait. No they're not. Dwyane Wade's won a title and James has been in the Finals. But that's the perception. 

It's an interesting corollary that our society will define age with physically limited, but also often associate it with toughness. If you make it that long, you must have thick skin. And that's the area where most people doubt the Heat and believe in the Celtics. The Celtics are betting that you'll have an easier time drawing breath at your young age, but that they'll be the last one standing when the bell rings. 

I closed the door on the Magic's window and needless to say, team bloggers are not buying. I was ready to shut the door on the Celtics last year, and they slammed it back in my face, walked in, made themselves a sandwich and tracked mud on my carpet. I'm not willing to bury the Celtics until the heart's stopped beating. Age can be cruel, but for the Celtics, it's a beast they can live with. They remain contenders to the ring until that last breath gives out. 
Posted on: September 7, 2010 2:52 pm
 

Pop Quiz: How will the All-Star Game look?

Fall is here, hear the yell, back to school, ring the bell ... The NBA season is right around the corner, and NBA training camp starts in just a few short weeks. To get you ready for the NBA season, we've put together 25 pop quizzes. Pencils ready? We continue our Pop Quizzes with this question...



What will the All-Star Game look like?


Los Angeles. City of Angels. Home of the back-to-back NBA champions, the legendary LA Lakers. And in February, home of the 2011 NBA All-Star Game. It's going to be ridiculous, it's going to be over-the-top (more so than even your normal All-Star Game). It's going to be expensive. Really, really expensive. It will also be interesting as next year there are likely to be big changes in the All-Star Game. So what exactly is that game going to look like?

It's difficult to predict, obviously, who will be participating in the game. Even more so than any other episode of predicting the future, there are so many factors that can play into who makes it. Not only things like injuries, team downturns, unexpected rises, and trades, but the popularity contest of the voting system. But there are some things we can examine the possibility of.

For starters, with Amar'e Stoudemire headed to New York, there's a spot down low for the West. You can slide in Tim Duncan, because he's like Johnny Cash. Steady like a freight train, sharp like a razor. Pau Gasol's another lock, as many think he's the best power forward in the league right no w. From there, you've got Zach Randolph and Chris Kaman as the other two bigs from last year's squad. Kaman's unlikely to return with the addition of Blake Griffin, and Randolph's success is tied to an inconsistent Grizzlies team. Meanwhile, Yao Ming returns from injury and will most likely look like a legitimate contender for the starting spot.

But what about Andrew Bynum? We've been waiting for Bynum to live up to his potential for three seasons, and he's constantly referred to as one of the best centers in the league, despite his numerous injury issues. With the Lakers getting older, and Bynum supposedly healthier than he has been in years, Bynum has to be considered a strong contender not just for the backup position, but possibly as a starting center (which would put Tim Duncan at power forward, where he belongs).

Speaking of Duncan, he and Dirk Nowitzki are headed down the stretch and it'll be important to note that one of them is going to take a step backwards. Age demands it. And though Duncan is widely considered the best power forward of all time by those that consider him a power forward, he's most likely to have the dropoff. You saw it at times last season. The writing isn't on the wall, but there's a pen by the chalkboard. Bear in mind we're talking about inches below the greatness he's always provided, but it might be enough with a rising Bynum to shove either him or Dirk out of the starting lineup. And that will just be weird.

This is all before we start trying to figure out the point guards in the West. Steve Nash showing no signs of slowing down. Chris Paul back to full health. Deron Williams healthy with Al Jefferson beside him and more of the offensive load. Tyreke Evans, out of the rookie well and into the general pool. Russell Westbrook, possibly coming on as one of the better slide and dice guards in the league on a team that looks poised to make a run. Stephoe Curry, a rookie of the year runner-up with another season under him and a license to score. This likely means Jason Kidd will not be returning to the team for the 11th time in his career.

And oh, yeah, Kobe will be back in the starting spot. No "probably." He will be.

In the East? Well, the Miami Triad was formed from guys in the East, so they're likely to stay. Even with a downturn in production from sharing the ball, all three should be locks, though it's hard to see Bosh making the starting spot as he was a reserve last season. Amar'e Stoudemire could wind up knocking Kevin Garnett out of the starting spot which would be another changing of the guard. But a more likely scenario is Joe Johnson being unable to reach the starting spot again and moving into the reserve spot as the East looks like the West from last year: four bigs and a guard (Dwyane Wade). Which will be disappointing considering Derrick Rose and Rajon Rondo's existence, both of whom are probable to return as starters.

Carlos Boozer, freed from the big-heavy West, may be able to work his way into a spot, and Paul Pierce may be on the bubble. If Andrew Bogut returns healthy, he could complicate matters, along with Brandon Jennings. Basically, point guards are going to massively complicate these rosters.

Sure, some of these players are going to go down to injury, others will have downturn seasons. But there's a strong indication that this might be a year of big changes in the All-Star Game, both with starting rosters and the reserve spots.

But the parties will be awesome regardless.
Posted on: August 20, 2010 12:44 pm
 

Pierce wants to retire a Celtic, finish in Europe

"" Posted by Royce Young

Players finishing careers out on another continent is nothing new. We've seen it quite a bit recently in soccer, with players like David Beckham and Thiery Henry coming to the United States to finish out a great career, all while getting paid.

It's surprising more NBA players don't do it. Stephon Marbury is in China right now, but other than that, not a ton of big name players have gone to Europe. Especially the guys that aren't dying for cash once their career finishes. It's not anything new for NBA guys to play in Europe, but star caliber players don't typically play professionally overseas. But Paul Pierce is planning on doing exactly that.

From an interview with CSNNE.com:
As far as retiring from the NBA, I think I will be done after this contract because eventually I want to go overseas and play and live for a couple of years. That's why this is a big contract for me, knowing I'm going to retire a Boston Celtic. I want to go to either Italy or Greece for a year. I think I want to be able to bring my family over to just kind of share a different experience overseas for a couple of years, before I settle into retirement.
Pierce currently is under contract with the Celtics through 2014, though he does have an opt out after the third year. Right now, he's 32 so that means he'd "retire" at 36. Players play well past that often times (hello Shaq), but rarely is a guy ever playing at at very high level anymore.

From the sounds of it, Pierce is more interested in a paid vacation with his new wife and family than he is competing in Europe. And in my mind, that's seriously brilliant. Why pay for an Italian vacation when you can make serious cash playing a couple more years of basketball? Plus, kudos for the move of playing an entire career with one NBA team. That doesn't happen much anymore and the fact Pierce doesn't intend to drag his playing days out as a journeyman bouncing between a few teams as a big name role player is a noble move.
Category: NBA
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com