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Tag:Golden State Warriors
Posted on: October 19, 2010 12:47 pm
Edited on: October 19, 2010 12:50 pm
 

Report: Warriors sale pretty much official

Posted by Royce Young

By the first week of November, Chris Cohan will finally be out in Golden State and a new era with a new owner will begin.

Matt Steinmetz of CSN Bay Area reports that according to multiple sources, new owner Joe Lacob has financing in place and is expected to seize control of the team no later than a few days into November. Lacob was hoping to get the owner approval vote at the Oct. 20-21 Board of Governor's meeting, but that appears unlikely, according to Steinmetz.

Will Lacob have control over the team by the season opener Oct. 27? That will be tight, it appears, though one source told Steinmetz is would be done by the time the Warriors open against the Rockets. While Lacob won't likely get the vote Oct. 20, a vote on the sale can be done by e-mail or teleconference at any time. Three-fourths of the owners have to approve of the sale for it to become final.

Lacob purchased the team with business partner Peter Guber back in mid-July for a reported $450 million. And since taking over (sort of), Lacob has moved quickly trying to restructure the future of the team. He's done numerous interviews trying to lay out a new vision and his influence is likely what helped push Don Nelson out the door and bring Keith Smart in. Lacob was also consulted on the David Lee move as well as the deal that signed Jeremy Lin.

Cohan has owned the team for 16 years and in that time has seen the Warriors appear only once in the postseason (2007). Cohan's purchase price was somewhere in the $120 million range.

The Warriors will have their new era soon. Just another week or two until they can wash their hands of the Chris Cohan era and hopefully move on to something a little brighter.
Posted on: October 19, 2010 10:18 am
Edited on: August 14, 2011 7:55 pm
 

Stephen Curry: running point, raising hopes

Golden State point guard Stephen Curry is growing up fast, focused on making the Warriors a playoff contender. Posted by Ben Golliver

“You make me feel old.” 

That was the reception from a middle-aged woman for Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry, as he emerged from the Rose Garden’s visiting locker room on Saturday night after nearly going quadruple double -- 17 points, 11 assists, 7 rebounds and 8 turnovers -- on the Portland Trail Blazers in a meaningless preseason game.

The 22-year old Curry hears that a lot when he travels the league, in part because of his baby face, in part because of his slight frame, in part because so many people remember him tagging along his father Dell, a long-time NBA veteran. But as Curry begins his sophomore trip through the league, after contending for Rookie of the Year honors last season and winning a gold medal at the FIBA World Championship this summer, he’s hearing a lot of others thing too. Like, “One of the best shooters in the league.” Like, “All star potential."

That’s the story for Curry and his new-look Warriors this season: emerging. “He surprised everybody last year because we thought maybe he wasn’t ready for the NBA,” Blazers forward Nicolas Batum said. “He seems more mature. He has learned the NBA game.”

Curry says he’s ready to take on the full time playmaking point guard duties that new head coach Keith Smart has laid out for him. “Down the stretch of last season with so many injuries I think my role would be to distribute the ball, and 1A was to score. This year I think it’s more managing the game, we have such a powerful lineup this year I’ll be able to pick and choose when I want to attack, when I want to get people the ball.”

With the offseason additions of power forward David Lee, forward Dorell Wright and big man Lou Amundson, there’s a steadiness in the Bay that wasn’t there last year. “We had so many guys rotating in and out with injuries,” Curry lamented on Saturday. “Coming from the D-League, guys who are going to be here for two weeks until somebody gets healthy. Playing with unorthodox lineups on the floor, it’s kind of tough to be consistent throughout the course of a season so hopefully that doesn’t have to happen this year. Right now we have more of what I’d call a traditional lineup, our big guys are healthy, we can go out there and know the rotation that coach is going to put in, know what to expect night in and night out, not have to adjust on the fly as much as we did last year.”

The bread and butter of Curry’s game remains his gorgeous shooting stroke, which he works at harder than just about any one in the league. Two and a half hours before Saturday’s preseason game, Curry went through his “plan” with Stephen Silas. The plan consists of getting up “about 200” shots prior to a game, although Curry says he takes even more some nights to get his rhythm. This isn’t a standstill three-point contest. Curry works on catching the ball in awkward locations, creating a clean look off the dribble while moving in all four different directions, stopping and popping, floating through the lane, you name it.

All the work has paid off. “He’s always been a pretty good shooter with range,” says Blazers coach Nate McMillan, who coached Curry during the World Championships as an assistant for Team USA.” Now he’s proven he can shoot the NBA three. He’s definitely one of the top shooters in the league.” Batum agrees. “He is a top two or three [shooter] in the NBA for sure. When he has the ball he’s very dangerous. You have to remember where he is. If you lose him, bam.”

Bam, indeed. While the Blazers threw three different guards at Curry and occasionally extended their ball pressure full-court to make his life even more difficult, Curry found his shots again and again on Saturday night. Pull up three in transition, stopping on a dime. Cross-over dribble for a step back mid-range jumper. Darting off of a high screen, squaring his shoulders and letting fly.

“He has no conscience,” former NBA player and three-point ace Hersey Hawkins, who has known Curry since he was a child, laughed last week. “I think every guy that’s been labeled a great shooter shoots the ball with confidence, regardless of makes or misses, they’re constantly looking for their shots. He moves well without the ball, that’s a plus for being a good shooter. He knows how to free himself up to get his shot off. And then he has a variety of shots. He can put it down, shoot the floaters, shoot runners, of course we know he can shoot the three. When guys like that get on a roll, they’re just unstoppable.”

Curry isn’t yet an unstoppable force, but he’s getting there. The game plan to defend him involves denying him clean looks and forcing him to make plays under pressure. Curry’s 11 assists on Saturday speak to his developing vision, but his 8 turnovers make it clear there’s still work to be done. “It’s still a little bit of an adjustment,” Smart said after the game, pointing to the team’s addition of true low post players as a contributing factor. “We won’t have as much space on the floor that we’ve had in the past. There’s nothing major that’s going on right now. He’s going to figure it out.”

A number of Curry’s zip passes hit unprepared teammates in the hands. “We shared that in our shootaround this morning. You guys need to make sure when you’re cutting to the basket, be ready to receive the ball,” Smart said. “Don’t just run through the lane. He’s putting the ball on the money in some places but they’re dropping too many of his passes. But those things are correctable. They can correct the pass, they can correct the catch and we can move forward.”

Curry smiled when asked about the turnovers. “I won’t have that many every night.”   He says he’s still adjusting to his new teammates, and vice versa, and feels like he’s being given as much time and space as he needs to develop into the point guard role. “They want me to be aggressive, make plays, but you can’t be careless with it,” Curry says. “You can’t take that freedom and running around the floor. I think they trust me to be smart with the ball, be aggressive, make the right play. Nights like tonight where I’m making a lot of dumb plays, it shows the trust they have in me to make the right ones by keeping me out there and letting me work through it.”

That work, on his jumper, on his maturity, on his playmaking, is turning heads. Asked if Curry will make an all star game in the near future, Hawkins didn’t hesitate. “Oh, yeah, definitely. I think he’s that good.” McMillan agreed. “He enjoys the game, he works at it. Just a talented player. If he continues to have that success and his team wins, you certainly have to consider that.”

Team success is on Curry’s mind too. “We have a lot of pieces we need to make that push, be in the mix with those eight or nine teams in the West competing for those playoff spots.” Whether it’s this year or next, Golden State is playoff bound in the near future.  Young Curry will see to that, as he makes us all feel old in the process.

Posted on: October 17, 2010 7:00 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 7:52 pm
 

Lou Amundson Breaks Finger, Needs Surgery

Golden State Warriors big man Lou Amundson reportedly needs surgery on a broken finger. Posted by Ben Golliver Matt Steinmetz of CSNBayArea.com reports that new Golden State Warriors big man Lou Amundson fractured his finger during a preseason game on Saturday night and that the injury will require surgery.
The Warriors are going to be without backup center Lou Amundson for a little while.  Amundson suffered a fracture in his right index finger during the fourth quarter of Saturday’s game against the Portland Trail Blazers – and the injury will require surgery.  The date for the surgery has not yet been determined. 

Amundson was a late addition for the Warriors, who signed him to a two-year, $5 million contract in early September. Don't be fooled by his ponytail: Amundson is a hustle guy off the bench who isn't afraid to mix it up.  The Warriors and first-year head coach Keith Smart will likely make due in his absence by leaning more heavily on new starting power forward David Lee, who was also acquired this summer. Steinmetz reports that backup big men Dan Gadzuric and Jeff Adrien are also likely to see their playing time increase in Amundson's absence.
Posted on: October 15, 2010 9:55 am
 

Shootaround 10.15.10: Good and bad places

Dwight Howard thinks the new rule has its place, Monta Ellis' wife is keeping him in the right place, Andre Blatche needs a new place, and Al Jefferson is getting into a good place, all in today's Shootaround.
Posted by Matt Moore

So while the Union's suing and the Celtics are freaking out, Dwight Howard has come out and said that in regards to the new tech rules, "They want us to cut down on talking to the refs, as hard as that may be. We've adjusted to everything else that's put out there. So we'll adjust." That's right. The guy that watches cartoons, does funny voices, and is pretty much known as a big kid, he's the one who's being grown up about this. The world's gone mad. Dwight Howard is in a place where he can have perspective and Kevin Garnett is not. What is happening?

Marvel Comics is teaming up with ESPN and the NBA for a series of promotional spots . Does it bother anyone else how much the league is marketing towards the storyline of LeBron leaving Cleveland? Don't get me wrong, I've been softer on James than others because if you asked me if I wanted to go work somewhere nicer with two of my friends with a greater chance of success, I'd probably do it too. But rubbing Cleveland's nose in it constantly for marketing purposes and playing into their spurned response seems exploitive.

Monta Ellis is in a much better place emotionally and mentally. Why? Dude got married and his wife, a lady cop, has him in line. I can understand where Ellis is coming from, as I'm sure a lot of men can. You have your wilder 20's, jacking up shots and riding mopeds, and then you get married and that stuff gets thrown out. This would be better if she were a segway cop or something. Still, it's good to see Ellis in a better place.

Mike Wells of the Indy Star reports that both Dahntay Jones and Solomon Jones are on the block as the Pacers try and move for a big man.

TruthAboutIt.Net's Kyle Weidie is more concerned with Andre Blatche at the moment than Gilbert Arenas. Blatche boosted his stock immensely last year with some solid play on the blown-up Wizards. But he thinks of himself as a primary scoring threat, not as a complimentary piece, and has big chemistry issues. If they can get him on the market and get a good player to put next to Wall for him, they should move, and quickly.

Alvin Gentry is telling his team that if they want to be succesful this year, they're going to have to be a "GREAT" defensive team . This for a team that had a worse defensive rating than any of Mike D'Antoni's years. Even if you think Amar'e was the problem (and he wasn't), good luck with that, coach.

Sasha Vujacic suffered a concussion in practice and is out indefinitely. Perhaps he was confused on what being "unconscious" from the arc meant.

In case you missed it last night , you need to see John Wall destroying the Bucks in 40 secons. For real.

Mike D'Antoni called Anthony Randolph a "stat magnet. " If only that magnet wasn't similarly charged to that of a "high basketball IQ magnet" because Randolph seems to repel that idea. Many, Knicks fans especailly, hope this is the season that changes. He can be an absolute game-changer when his head's in the right place.

And finally, just a small basketball note. If you caught last night's Jazz game you saw this, but if you didn't, Al Jefferson looked really good. Even with an out-of-shape Deron Williams working with him, Jefferson was hitting from all over the floor and attacking the glass on both sides of the ball. Defensively he's still figuring the system out, but things are looking tremendously good for Utah's new acquisition.


Posted on: October 14, 2010 10:20 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 7:50 pm
 

Could Michael Jordan score 100 points?

Michael Jordan said recently that he could score 100 points in today's NBA. Is that claim as ridiculous as it sounds? Posted by Ben Golliver If you've spent more than 27 seconds on Basketball-Reference.com  (or were alive and able to watch television during the 1980s or 1990s), you already know that Michael Jordan put up crazy numbers. How does a 47-point, 11-rebound, 13-assist, 4-steals, 2-blocks effortsuit you? Just ridiculous.
Jordan made some waves today claiming that he could score 100 points in a game if he played in the modern era, as part of a marketing effort for the NBA 2K11 video game
Kelly Dwyer of Yahoo! Sports offers the definitive takedown of Jordan's claim, noting the absurdity of Wilt Chamberlain's push for 100 points.
Wilt was a 7-2 dominant force going up against a 6-10 backup center on the New York Knicks back in 1962. He was able to put up 63 shots and attempt 32 free throws mainly because the pace was so, so much faster back in that era, and because his Philadelphia Warriors team was intentionally fouling the Knicks down the stretch in order to get Wilt the ball every time down court in a contest that was a 16-point game at the end of the first quarter. It was an absolute joke of a "contest," and though Wilt is to be commended for his brilliance, there's a reason why nobody has come very close in the 48 years since Wilt's 100-point game.

We all know Jordan's career-high was 69 points against the Cleveland Cavaliers, a far cry from his imagined target of 100. But a little Basketball-Reference digging and a stretch of the imagination reveals that perhaps 100 wasn't as untouchable for Jordan as it might appear at first glance.
  • In 1993, Jordan made a career-high 27 field goals in a loss to the Orlando Magic. He finished with 64 points; 26 of the 27 field goals were two-pointers, which was also a career high. 
  • In 1990 , Jordan made a career-high seven of 12 three-point attempts in a win over the Golden State Warriors, going for 44 points on the evening.  
  • And, in a 1987 win over the New Jersey Nets, Jordan converted a career-high 26 (out of 27) free throws on his way to 58 points.
So what if we combined all of these career-highs into one ultimate Jordan performance for the ages?   The 26 two-point field goals would be good for 52 points. The seven treys would add on an additional 21 points, totaling 73 points. Add in the 26 freebies and you've got ... wait for it ... 99 points.  Our mythical Jordan night still wouldn't quite match Wilt Chamberlain's perfect 100. But it would come pretty dang close.
Posted on: September 30, 2010 12:55 pm
Edited on: September 30, 2010 12:55 pm
 

Warriors already name starting five

Posted by Royce Young

So much for camp battles and position competitions. New Warriors head coach Keith Smart has already figured out who he wants to use for his first first at the tip.

According to Matt Steinmetz of CSN Bay Area, Smart will start Stephen Curry, Monta Ellis, Dorell Wright, David Lee and Andris Biedrins. Who's shocked? Who's completely stunned there? What, you didn't think Dan Gadzuric had a shot?

David Lee will officially make the position change from center to power forward, which is probably a more natural spot for him anyway. In New York, he played as an undersized center in an up-tempo scheme and in Golden State, well, I guess he's just playing power forward in an up-tempo scheme.

Really, across the board though, the Warriors didn't have any wide open positions up for grabs. Maybe small forward where Vladamir Radmanovic or Rodney Carney could've pushed Wright, but Smart didn't want to mess with it. He wanted to get it out of the way early and let players start figuring out roles now.

The big question has been how Curry and Ellis play together but for the foreseeable future, they are going to be together in the backcourt in Golden State. And instead of opening up things and seeing how it played out, Smart decided to just lock everything down now. He knows the team already and he's sticking to the script. It's the expected starting five and probably the one he would've settled on had he opened up all five spots in camp.
Posted on: September 27, 2010 12:26 pm
Edited on: September 27, 2010 5:07 pm
 

MeloDrama Update: Media day looms

As the Carmelo Anthony situation continues to unfold (or not, depending on your view), we'll keep you up to date on the developments with our MeloDrama Updates. Buckle up, kids. The Hello-Melo Train is leaving the station.
Posted by Matt Moore


Here's the latest around the web as what is considered D-Day for the Nuggets approaches.
  • Our own Ken Berger reports that Anthony may not be in attendance today for Media Day. That's a scenario described by a source as one that will set the Nuggets into "disaster mode." Marc Stein folllows with word that even if Melo is in attendance, he may not talk to the media . That would allow him to send a message to the Nuggets without getting fined, which would happen in force if he were to "hold out" from training camp. The league responds quickly and strongly when players go that route. KB says he predicts Melo will arrive for media day as long as he's a Nugget. He's been careful to avoid things that could damage his public image.
  • Talks with Golden State are "going nowhere " according to Marc Stein. Woj reports that the four-team discussed last Friday has gained some momentum . A lot of this may be various pieces waiting to see if anyone breaks and offers more. For example, New Jersey waiting for Charlotte to break and offer Augustin, or Denver hoping someone else comes in with a huge offer. Everyone wants to "win" the trade naturally, which is what makes these things more complicated than sometimes they need to be.
  • NBA FanHouse's Sam Amick reports that former Nets talked to Carmelo over the weekend and said that Newark is a long ways away from New York, essentially warning him off of Jersey . Jason Kidd was among those that conveyed that message, which just seems cruel, if honest. Amick says that New York is just giddy about this development.
  • This whole thing has to be excruciating for teams trying to drag Anthony out of Denver due to Denver's considerable leverage. They've got the new CBA working against Melo, their rights to him, and a lack of albatross contracts that they have to ditch. They clear considerable space this summer with Kenyon Martin coming off the books. In short, their biggest concern is how this could impact ticket sales and set back their progress. But then again, if they trade Melo, they're likely looking at a rebuilding process regardless. That might include Chauncey Billups.
  • The looming man behind the curtain, William Wesley, who Ken Berger reported was behind these talks in the first place, has also visited with Jay-Z in New Jersey according to KB. That's a pretty clear indication of the split going on. Then again, Wesley was eventually removed from the discussion of LeBron James, and you have to wonder if he'll be similarly cut out because Melo wants to wait for New York or Chicago, via free agency or trade. There's also a lot of talk about Chris Paul eventually being involved in forming a new Big 3 wherever Melo goes, with Amar'e Stoudemire being swapped out for Brook Lopez if he winds up in Brooklyn.
We'll keep you updated as the Melo-drama continues. Somebody get the man a pink wig.

Posted on: September 24, 2010 9:32 am
 

Shootaround 9.24.10: The best players rated

Posted by Royce Young
  • Bill Plaschke of the LA Times on Andrew Bynum's latest injury: "The last time a Lakers big man did something so medically dumb, it was Shaquille O'Neal refusing to fix his toe until just before the 2002-03 training camp, claiming: "I got hurt on company time, so I'll heal on company time." Two underachieving seasons later, he was on Miami time, traded because owner Jerry Buss decided he wasn't worth the trouble. Interestingly, the guaranteed part of Bynum's contract expires in two seasons, at which point Buss will have to make the same sort of decision. At this rate, maybe he shouldn't even wait that long. How can Andrew Bynum be the Lakers' future if you can't count on him today?"
  • Chris Mannix of SI on the Warriors move yesterday: "It's not like Lacob had many alternatives, either. Jeff Van Gundy isn't leaving the ABC booth for the Warriors and it's a little late in the game to be dialing up Lawrence Frank and Sam Mitchell too. Plus Smart, who Lacob told Bay Area reporters will receive a multi-year contract, comes cheap. If it doesn't work out this year the team can always cut ties after the season. But with Nelson gone, the Warriors can finally look towards the future without being encompassed by the shadow of the past. A new era has begun in Golden State and let's face it, it can't be much worse than the last."
  • Tim Kawakami on the end of the Don Nelson era: "Nelson just couldn't win anymore. And it became clear that he stopped caring, too. That is how Nelson morphed himself into the Cohan Culture, with spot moments of success amid long periods of massive distress and political intrigue. I don't know how the Lacob era will turn out. Maybe well, maybe more seasons of failure. But Lacob knew that had to start by moving Don Nelson aside -- and all his eccentricities and feuds and controversies along with him. Nelson wasn't the worst thing about the Warriors. But he was, in the end, the most visible and corrosive influence on the players and fans. By cleaning him out, Lacob creates a fresher Warriors climate and a brand new era."
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com