Tag:Adam Silver
Posted on: March 3, 2012 7:26 pm
Edited on: March 3, 2012 7:36 pm
 

Report: David Stern done after two more seasons

An NBA world without David Stern is an NBA world tough to picture. (Getty Images)
Posted by Royce Young

David Stern has made it pretty clear that the end is near for him in the commissioner's seat. He stressed at All-Star Weekend that he would not be around for the next collective bargaining agreement, whether that comes in 10 years, or six.

But as for how soon? Maybe just two seasons from now, reports the New York Daily News:
Insiders say that David Stern is planning to tell NBA owners at their April Board of Governors meeting that he’s good for two more seasons, and that he’ll step down as commissioner then. “At one point, he had talked about doing it for one more season, but it looks now like two more,” said a league source. League suits say there probably won’t even be a search conducted to find a successor and that deputy commissioner Adam Silver is a lock to succeed Stern, with one source saying Stern’s lieutenant has the backing of almost 90% of the owners. All he needs is a simple majority.
Stern has almost been as much a constant in the NBA as the basketball itself. He's been around for 27 years since taking over for Larry O'Brien in 1984. To think of the league without him is, well, strange.

He's likely ready to go. He at least sort of seems prepared for it. He emphatically endorsed deputy commissioner Adam Silver in Orlando and really appeared completely at ease with passing the torch.

But it's the sort of thing where you believe it when you see it. Stern's been at this a long time and has probably been planning his exit route for a while. He wants to make sure the game is as healthy as it can possibly be when he hands the keys to the big car to Silver. With a new CBA in place, Stern is going to be sure that the game is in a great place.

Whenever it happens, he's going to leave behind quite a legacy. Which he should over 27 years. He's always been considered one of, if not the best commissioner in sports history, and once he finally leaves his post, we'll all spend plenty of time evaluating that I'm sure. As for Stern, he put it simply this year in Oklahoma City how he wanted to be remember: "Both teams played hard," he said.
Category: NBA
Posted on: March 2, 2012 2:54 pm
Edited on: March 2, 2012 3:21 pm
 

Silver says Jordan is 'trying hard' with Bobcats

By Matt Moore 

Michael Jordan wants to work harder as an NBA owner. (Getty)
BOSTON-- At the Sloan Sports Analytics Conference Friday morning, NBA Deputy Commissioner Adam Silver was asked about the impact of the new Collective Bargaining Agreement and how it's impacting the smaller market teams, specifically the Charlotte Bobcats. His response was telling about both the Bobcats and the new CBA in regards to how the league has sold the deal to him. Specifically, Silver pointed to ownership and the role it plays in market dynamics.

"Michael (Jordan) has assured us that he's working harder than he ever has in his life & playing less golf," Silver said. Jordan's Bobcats are 4-29 and approaching historic levels of failure. Jordan has often been criticized for heading to the links and taking a passive approach first as minority owner and then later as majority owner. 

Silver noted that the new CBA has put teams in a better position to succeed with good management. Rich Cho is in his first year as GM and the rebuilding plan is very early in its infancy. Having a dedicated staff and ownership working in unison is the only way they're going to escape the gravity of their mediocrity which has only yielded one playoff appearance in team history. 

Silver also referenced the attendance success when the Hornets were located in Charlotte as evidence that the market is viable, while also admitting that small market teams will continue to struggle due to the alignment of market factors. Contraction is talked about a lot in regards to the Bobcats, but every indication from the league is that both the current and former Charlotte franchises (the Hornets) are both safe for the time being. 



Posted on: March 2, 2012 10:57 am
Edited on: March 2, 2012 12:14 pm
 

Silver touts transparency in lockout tactics

By Matt Moore 

Adam Silver could be pulling the strings at the next CBA negotiations. (Getty)
BOSTON -- Adam Silver appeared Friday as a panelist for the opening session of the Sloan Sports Analytics Conference. During the conversation on the panel of "In the Best Interest of the Game: The Evolution of Sports Leagues" Silver was asked about the keys to the league's success in the recent labor negotiations, and referenced "transparency" as a key. Which is kind of interesting.

Silver specifically said that the league's opening of their books to the players was crucial to the league's approach. Personally, I thought starving the players off their paychecks for two months was helpful, too, but sure, whatever. That issue was hugely contested throughout the lockout, as the league continuously held back releasing its figures. When the league later did "open the books," the players heavily disputed how their figures regarding losses were calculated. A Forbes report also disputed the NBA's conclusions. The league went on the offensive to defend their assertions of losses and presented a compelling case in some of the most open discussion about the realities of the league's financials we've seen.

Why is this relevant?

We're nearly four months out of the lockout, and the battle is still being waged with the same talking points. Silver referenced the possibility of being back at the table in six years, when both the NBA and NBPA have an opt-out which could drag professional basketball back into lockout hell once again. Silver repeated the same tenets we heard throughout the lockout from Silver, but in this session, there wasn't the edginess we saw after the tense hours at the negotiating table over the summer and fall. Silver impressed with his command of the talking points while also conveying something we hadn't seen from the league in several months, empathy, for the owners, players, and fans.

Silver noted that after the lockout's resolution, there seemed to be "very little acrimony" between the owners and players.

We'll see how true that is in six years, when it could be Silver leading the league for the first time as both its head negotiator and public face. If Friday is any indication, the players should be prepared for an even tougher opponent should that acrimony miraculously return.

Posted on: February 28, 2012 6:48 pm
 

NBA is popular, but not seeing profits

Posted by Royce Young

It's almost becoming a weekly NBA press release. "[Insert game] was the NBA's highest rated in 15 years." The league's popularity is reaching incredible highs. Behind young starpower, an exciting product and an intriguing rumor mill, the NBA is soaring.

And yet, the league isn't making money. Deputy commission Adam Silver explained in Orlando.

"The league will not make money this year," Silver says. And next year? "Maybe."

Don't forget, and I'm sure you haven't, there was a lockout this season. Over exactly this stuff. As a result, the NBA reduced Basketball Related Income from 57 percent to 51.1 percent for the players. The system was tweaked and changed to benefit owners. By all accounts, there was really no excuse for the league to not make money. Especially with the rising popularity of the game.

So what's going on? Henry Abbott of TrueHoop explains:
The explanation from the league is that the cuts in player costs roughly match the losses from last year. But this year the league says there were an additional $200 million in losses related to the lockout, for instance due to lost ticket revenue and corporate sponsorships that didn't happen.

More importantly, popularity only equals big changes in revenue over years. The most obvious way that happens is with more lucrative national TV deals, but the old deals are still in place for two more years. High TV ratings have not meant new TV revenues for the league. Corporate sponsorships similarly take time to develop.

And according to the league, the popularity is nice, but not yet a cure for the league's financial distress.
You can't take a shortsighted view of the new collecive bargaining agreement. It's a 10-year deal and as Silver said after one negotiation in the fall, he believes the league will eventually be proven right with this deal. It's not about the present. It's about the future.

But there certainly is a difference in the game being healthy and popular and it being profitable. With all the concessions the owners got in the last negotiation though, if they aren't making money when the league is at all-time highs in popularity, then there's really nothing left to do than look in the mirror.
Category: NBA
Posted on: November 26, 2011 3:15 am
Edited on: November 26, 2011 4:02 am
 

NBA, Players 'reach tentative agreement'

Posted by Ben Gollivernba-lockout

After representatives of the NBA and its players met for 15 hours of labor negotiations Friday into Saturday, Ken Berger of CBSSports.com first reported that a "tentative agreement [was] reached, according to one of the negotiators."

The lengthy face-to-face meeting re-opened negotiations after the National Basketball Players Association disbanded to file an antitrust lawsuit against the league last week.

Talks began at noon Friday and ran past 3 a.m. Saturday morning. The NBA and its players held a joint press conference after 3:30 a.m. to announce the tentative deal.

"We have reached a tentative understanding," NBA commissioner David Stern confirmed. "We're optimistic that the NBA season will come to pass on Dec. 25, Christmas Day, with a triple-header."

Training camps would begin on Dec. 9, according to Stern, if everything plays out as expected. Yahoo Sports reported that free agency and training camps would open concurrently once the deal is approved by both sides.

Former NBPA executive director Billy Hunter repeated Stern's message.

"I want to announce... that we are happy that we have been able to reach a tentative litigation settlement," Hunter said. "We're going to turn it all over to the lawyers ... and see how that proceeds ... "Once we present it (to players), we're confident they will support it."

The three games originally scheduled for Christmas Day include: the Boston Celtics at the New York Knicks, the Miami Heat at the Dallas Mavericks, and the Chicago Bulls at the Los Angeles Lakers.

Stern said that the league has scheduled a conference call with the NBA's Labor Relations Committee to present the proposed agreement on Saturday. The NBPA must re-form its union to ratify the agreement as well. This step is considered a formality.

"We want to play basketball," said San Antonio Spurs owner Peter Holt, head of the NBA's Labor Relations Committee. "Let's go play basketball."

Here's video of Stern and Hunter announcing tentative agreement on Saturday morning.



Berger reported that, in addition to former NBPA executive director Billy Hunter, former NBPA president Derek Fisher and former NBPA board member Maurice Evans, the players were led into the negotiations by attorney Ron Klempner and economist Kevin Murphy. The league was represented by Stern, deputy commissioner Adam Silver, Holt and NBA general counsel Rick Buchanan. NBPA attorney Jeffrey Kessler, who recently said that Stern treated NBA players "like plantation workers," was not present.

The two sides reportedly exchanged "back-channel" communication on Tuesday and Wednesday for the first time since Nov. 10, when the NBA made its latest formal proposal to the players, which was rejected, as the players opted to file suit instead. 

Saturday is the 159th day of the ongoing NBA lockout.
Posted on: November 26, 2011 3:00 am
Edited on: November 26, 2011 3:12 am
 

NBA, Players 'reach tentative agreement'

Posted by Ben Gollivernba-lockout

Representatives of the NBA and its players met for more than 15 hours on Friday in New York City to reopen face-to-face labor negotiations after the National Basketball Players Association disbanded to file file an antitrust lawsuit against the league last week. Ken Berger of CBSSports.com reports that a "tentative agreement reached, according to one of the negotiators." 

Talks began at noon Friday and ran past 3 a.m. Saturday morning. 

The two sides are reportedly aiming to hammer out an agreement that would allow the NBPA to salvage a 66-game regular season that would begin on Christmas Day. It is assumed that the NBA needs a roughly 1-month lead time to get a new season up and running, and Friday was exactly one month prior to Christmas.

Ken Berger of CBSSports.com reported that, in addition to former NBPA executive director Billy Hunter, former NBPA president Derek Fisher and former NBPA board member Maurice Evans, the players were led into the negotiations by attorney Ron Klempner and economist Kevin Murphy. The league was represented by NBA commissioner David Stern, deputy commissioner Adam Silver, San Antonio Spurs owner Peter Holt and NBA general counsel Rick Buchanan. NBPA attorney Jeffrey Kessler, who recently said that Stern treated NBA players "like plantation workers," was not present, although Yahoo reported he did participate via conference call.  

The two sides reportedly exchanged "back-channel" communication on Tuesday and Wednesday for the first time since Nov. 10, when the NBA made its latest formal proposal to the players, which was rejected, as the players opted to file suit instead. 

Saturday is the 159th day of the ongoing NBA lockout.

This post will update with more information. 
Posted on: November 8, 2011 8:59 pm
Edited on: November 9, 2011 1:25 am
 

Kessler: NBPA treated 'like plantation workers'

Posted by Ben Gollivernba-lockout

Here we go again.

Months after television commentator Bryant Gumbel sparked a national controversy by referring to NBA commissioner David Stern as a "modern plantation overseer" -- a comment that NBPA executive director Billy Hunter distanced himself from -- union lawyer Jeffrey Kessler has taken to invoking slavery during the most critical stage of the league's ongoing labor negotiations.

The Washington Post reports that Kessler, like Gumbel before him, made referenece to a "plantation" in a criticism of the NBA's bargaining strategy.

“To present that in the context of ‘take it or leave it,’ in our view, that is not good faith,” Kessler, who also represented the NFL players in their labor dispute with the NFL, said in a telephone interview Monday night. “Instead of treating the players like partners, they’re treating them like plantation workers.”

Kessler's comments, the paper reports, led Stern to call him the "single most divisive force in our negotiations." They are, by far, the harshest criticism levied at Stern by someone affiliated with the NBPA during these ongoing labor negotiations and they represent a stark contrast to Hunter's more subdued response to Gumbel's similar attack on Stern. 

Back in October, Gumbel said that Stern "has always seemed eager to be viewed as some kind of modern plantation overseer, treating NBA men as if they were his boys." He also referred to Stern's opinion of the players as "hired hands."

Gumbel's controversial comments sparked a round of responses almost immediately given that a vast majority of NBA owners are caucasian while a vast majority of NBA players are African-Americans. Shortly after Gumbel's comments were made, NBA deputy commissioner Adam Silver said that they were "outrageous." Hunter said that, while Stern is a "hard-charger" in negotiations, he is not racist "at all." Basketball Hall of Famer and TNT commentator Charles Barkley simply called Gumbel's comments "stupid." The Reverend Jesse Jackson warned such talk could make these negotiations take an ugly turn.

Coincidentally on Tuesday, Stern was asked in an interview for his thoughts on Gumbel's comments. "I think that’s just an occupational hazard," Stern said. "If you're the head of the league you take what everyone dishes out."

The Sporting News notes this is not his first explosion. He has recently accused Portland Trail Blazers owner Paul Allen of "hijacking" negotiations and he recently called the NBA's offer to players a "fraud."
Posted on: November 1, 2011 11:16 pm
 

David Stern denies secretly meeting Derek Fisher

Posted by Ben Gollivernba-lockout

In case you were worried that representatives of the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association were actually meeting face-to-face, NBA commissioner David Stern is here to set the record straight. There were no meetings!

The New York Times reports that Stern flatly denied meeting with NBPA president Derek Fisher, although he was speaking about a reported secret meeting where a "side deal" was allegedly conducted without the consent of NBPA executive director Billy Hunter.
One report said that Fisher secretly met with Stern and the deputy commissioner Adam Silver in an attempt to make a deal.

“That would be false,” Stern said.

Fisher also denied the report that suggested he met with Stern in a letter sent to the NBPA on Monday. "Usually I wouldn't even dignify absurd media reports with a comment," Fisher's letter read. "But before these reports go any further, let me say on the record to each of you, my loyalty has and always will be with the players... There have been no side agreements, no side negotiations or anything close."

Meanwhile, Hunter also denied that there was a rift between himself and Fisher in a letter sent to the NBPA on Tuesday, but also tried to redirect the discussion to the current state of negotiations. "We will not be intimidated by public threats, ultimatums and manufactured drop dead dates," Hunter's letter read. "We will stand firm in our resolve to negotiate a fair deal for our current membership and those who will join our ranks in the future," Hunter said.

Well, we now have denials from all involved parties but are still left without actual discourse on the issues. Labor negotiations broke off last Friday and there are currently no new negotiations scheduled.

At this point, it would actually be more productive if Stern, Silver, Fisher and Hunter all set of a series of secret meetings with each other and then continually leaked the fact that they were meeting to the media. At least they would be meeting!

If there's any upshot here it's that Stern told the New York Times multiple times that he's still trying. 
“We’re trying very hard to get a deal done with the players, or we were, and we don’t need any external distractions to that focus.”

I believe that a majority of teams are in favor of making the deal that we were offering to the players,” Stern said. “And I’m trying very hard to keep that deal on the table.”
Just to boil all of this nonsense and hot air down to its core: nothing is being accomplished but they still claim they haven't given up. Fantastic news. Don't keel over in optimistic over-exertion.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com