Tag:Chris Duhon
Posted on: November 16, 2011 12:30 pm
Edited on: November 16, 2011 1:54 pm
 

Wall, Westbrook in club where shooting happened

Posted by Royce Young

A number of NBA and NFL players were partying at a New York City nightclub when a gunman opened fire, killing an ex-con and injuring two others, according to the New York Daily News.

None of the NFL or NBA players were injured. Among them though were John Wall, Russell Westbrook, Carlos Boozer, Chris Duhon and Kemba Walker, as well as five New York Giants -- Victor Cruz, Hakeem Nicks, Aaron Ross, Antrel Rolle and Chris Canty. The NBA players were still in New York, presumably after the players' meeting that happened Monday.
The gunman, clad in a white leather jacket, crashed the crowded party at the Juliet Supper Club on W. 21st St. by squeezing off five shots shortly before 2:30 a.m., police said.
[...]

In Tuesday’s bloodshed, the killer is thought to have fired the shots in a bid to get even after a woman was bumped on the dance floor — but her relationship to the gunman was not clear, the sources said.
Also in the club was actress Reese Witherspoon and her former husband Ryan Phillippe. Again, no players were involved or injured. They were just there when some psycho came storming in firing off shots. Which is extremely scary.

Via PBT
Posted on: January 26, 2011 1:46 pm
Edited on: January 26, 2011 6:58 pm
 

Magic release Jason Williams after he no-shows

Orlando Magic point guard Jason Williams deserted his team and has been released. Posted by Ben Golliver. jason-williams

Update (6:56 PM): So much for taking the patient approach. The Orlando Magic announced Wednesday afternoon that they had released Williams.

------------------------
There are many ways that the NBA is unlike your job, but there is one crucial similarity: showing up matters.

According to the Orlando Sentinel, Magic point guard Jason Williams has apparently not clocked in and not informed his bosses why he hasn't clocked in, and that's a big no-no even in the world of professional basketball. The Magic are currently on a road trip and Williams is not in attendance, leaving president Otis Smith a bit peeved.
"Well, he's not with the team. We'll deal with him when we get back to Orlando."
Asked if Williams has asked for his release, Smith said, "Not so much in those terms. You say his 'release,' we're not into giving guys their release. He signed a contract to play basketball for the Orlando Magic, and we're expecting him to uphold his end of that deal."

Asked if Williams is balking at his limited playing time or is facing a personal issue, Smith said, "From what I gather, he's facing more of a personal issue. I don't know if he wants more playing time. That was talked to him about before we signed him. When we signed him, we signed him as a third point guard. That didn't necessarily change."
Williams has barely played this season, and was further squeezed out of any chance at truly cracking the rotation when Smith traded for Gilbert Arenas. Barring another franchise-altering trade, Williams doesn't figure to see the court any time soon, given that he's behind starter Jameer Nelson, solid backup Chris Duhon and Arenas, unless there's a major injury (really, a series of injuries).

While his disappearing act is disappointing, his unhappiness is no great surprise as Williams mentioned earlier this season that he was considering leaving the game due to ongoing foot problems. 

So far, Smith has played a sticky situation spot on: Defuse the initial news, express his unhappiness with Williams' lack of professionalism and realize that he holds all the cards. Releasing Williams would be detrimental to Orlando's depth chart and a contender can't make a habit of doing professional favors for its scrubs in the thick of a hotly-contested playoff chase. 

The most important thing to result from the situation is to establish a clear conduct standard for the rest of the players. Williams has always been a bit of a loose cannon; he's not worth compromising your culture in any way from a basketball or locker room standpoint. Barring a remarkable explanation regarding the health/well-being of a close family member, a fine and possible short-term suspension without pay is in order. 

If Williams is truly ready to give up on his career, then there's not much Smith can do to prevent that. He will almost certainly regret a decision to leave the game come playoff time, and hopefully someone close to him is whispering that in Williams' ear right now, wherever he might be.
Posted on: December 20, 2010 5:33 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 9:42 pm
 

Rumor: Magic looking to trade for backup big man

After trading Marcin Gortat to the Phoenix Suns, the Orlando Magic are reportedly searching for a reserve big man to backup Dwight Howard. Posted by Ben Gollivermarcin-gortat


How quickly NBA teams turn from sellers into buyers.  The Orlando Magic, owners of probably the best center depth in the NBA last week, now are stretched thin, incredibly exposed if MVP candidate and starting center Dwight Howard should go down to injury and forced to play small ball when he is on the bench. How did that happen? Two big-time trades this weekend that netted Gilbert Arenas, Jason Richardson and Hedo Turkoglu gave the Magic added offensive firepower and depth on the wings, but came with one large cost: the move of backup center Marcin Gortat to the Phoenix Suns.  Magic executive Otis Smith sounds prepared to address his new-found vulnerability upfront and is reportedly on the prowl for Gortat's replacement already, according to NBA Fanhouse
The Orlando Magic have asked about the availability of both New York's Ronny Turiaf and Philadelphia's Tony Battie, hoping to fill quickly their new void at backup center behind Dwight Howard.
The Magic, according to NBA sources, would like to use backup point guard Chris Duhon as trade bait, but they also would be willing to use small forward Quentin Richardson to get what they want.
Gortat is an agile, physical big man on a reasonable long-term contract and, as we noted on Saturday, he comes out as one of the big winners of the weekend's trade activity, given the large role he will surely take on in the desert now that he is no longer trapped in Dwight Howard's shadow. Replacing him will be no easy task, as Smith is surely well aware.  NBA teams don't often trade big for small without attaching a heavy premium, even when it comes to reserve parts. Turiaf, almost assuredly, will cost Orlando more than they are willing to pay. While Duhon is solid, and capable of playing more minutes than are available in Orlando, it's unlikely that he or Richardson is going to spark a ton of league-wide interest on their own. Aside from dangling Duhon, Smith's options going forward are to settle for a less productive warm body or to consider offering up another trade chip, such as reserve guard J.J. Redick. Like Gortat, Redick is a valuable role-player with a defined NBA skill -- he can shoot the rock from deep -- and he is signed to a reasonable long-term deal, making roughly $6.6 million a year through 2012-2013.  In Orlando, Redick is now fighting for minutes with Arenas, Jason Richardson and Quentin Richardson, so moving him wouldn't be a catastrophic loss. It would make for even more of a rotation overhaul than has already been enacted, but true Dwight Howard Injury Insurance is bound to carry a steep price. Patience wouldn't be the worst thing in the world for Smith, as some time to assess how his first round of moves work out could clarify which of the guards should be the true odd man out. 
Posted on: October 17, 2010 4:36 pm
Edited on: October 17, 2010 8:34 pm
 

Brandon Bass plays well, increases trade value?

Orlando Magic forward Brandon Bass has played well in the preseason when he's gotten the chance and teams that need frontcourt help are likely taking notice.
Posted by Ben Golliver.


Once again, the Orlando Magic enter the 2010-2011 NBA season with the league's deepest roster. Coach Stan Van Gundy has loads of options when he turns to his bench, with all five positions being covered more than capably. His backup pont guard, Chris Duhon, started last season. His backup small forward, Quentin Richardson, started last season. His backup shooting guard, J.J. Redick, and his backup center, Marcin Gortat, could start for a number of teams this season. 

The only real question is at the backup power forward spot, where he has two talented but different options in Ryan Anderson and Brandon Bass. Neither possesses the top-end talent, currently, to completely settle the playing time debate that dates back to last season. 

That brings us to a piece by Brian Schmitz of the Orlando Sentinel , who notes that Van Gundy opted to start Anderson over Bass when he benched his usual starting five during a recent preseason game  and that Bass has responded by playing very well.
It’s no secret that Magic power forward Brandon Bass wants to find a place to play, whether it’ s in Orlando or somewhere else.

And the way he’s played lately, he might get his wish — and my guess is the Magic are only waiting for the right deal to come along.

Bass is showcasing his talents for other teams, such as the Indiana Pacers, who need power-forward help.

Bass was coming off a 9-point, 7-rebound, 3-block effort in the last preseason game he played, against the Pacers Oct. 8. Against the Charlotte Bobcats on Thursday night, he led the club with 16 points, nine rebounds and added two blocks in 31 minutes.

Should Anderson continue to see more minutes, I think we can agree that Bass becomes the best third-stringer in the NBA. (It's a shame there's no award voting and trophy for 11th man of the year.) 

But it's also fair for Magic general manager Otis Smith to continue to take the patient approach. Talented big man only get more valuable over the course of a season as injuries arise. That goes for both the Magic and any potential trade partners.
Posted on: July 28, 2010 9:07 am
 

Orlando locked and loaded for future

Posted by Matt Moore

The Orlando Magic are a force in the NBA. Despite making the Finals in 2009, and the Eastern Conference Finals in 2010, there are still those who dont' fully realize how good this Magic team has been. Much of this is on account of their style of play, which focuses on their three point shooting as part of their "1-in-4-out" strategy. The Magic set a record last season for made three pointers. They believe that this perimeter attack, when combined with Dwight Howard's physical play and their elite-level defense is a recipe for a championship.

So much so that they've locked into the approach for three more years.

The Orlando Sentinel reports that the Magic have agreed to three-year extensions with both Stan Van Gundy and GM Otis Smith. The extensions are part of a wider range of moves that look to reformulate the structure of the front office with several executives being promoted and/or changing titles. Van Gundy's contract was set to expire at the end of this season. SVG has faced criticism from just about everyone, from Dwight Howard to Shaquille O'Neal to Michael Wilbon for his coaching style, which generally involves a lot of yelling. Teaching, to be sure. But a lot of yelling. And then screaming, and then more yelling. But despite all the criticism, and what I can only assume are a lot of throat lozenges, Van Gundy is effective. And that's what matters to Orlando ownership.

Meanwhile, as Magic blog Orlando Pinstriped Post points out , the Magic are primed for their best three-point shooting season yet. Of the nine players currently on roster with the Magic who do not play center, 8 of them had a three point shooting percentage above the league average last season. Their top four backcourt players (Nelson, Carter, Redick, Duhon) shot better than 37%. The Magic replaced two of their worst three-point shooters (Jason Williams and Matt Barnes) with two solid-to-great three point shooters in Quentin Richardson and Chris Duhon. The Magic are primed to hit from the perimeter like never before.

And they've got their abrasive general back as well.
Posted on: July 22, 2010 5:59 pm
Edited on: July 23, 2010 11:11 am
 

Offseason Reviews: Southeast Division

Posted by Matt Moore

With only a handful of free agents left on the market and with summer league over, we thought we'd take a look at how various teams did over the summer in negotiating their moves.

Atlanta Hawks

Added: Joe Johnson (re-signed for eleventy billion dollars) Jordan Crawford (draft)
Lost: Josh Childress (didn't really have him anyway, but technically, they lost the rights to him in trade)

Philosophy: "Self-delusion is all the rage this summer!"

What are you going to do if you're Atlanta in six years? When Joe Johnson's crossover is no longer deadly and you're paying him $20 million? The goal, apparently, is to try and contend for a title in the next three years, hoping Al Horford and Josh Smith keep developing, Jeff Teague turns into a starter-caliber point guard, and maybe figure out some big name free agent you can sign on the cheap, like Shaq, that will put you over the top. It's not that the Hawks are a bad team. Far from it. While everyone was mocking them in the mid-00's for stockpiling forwards, they've either developed them into quality starters or raised their trade value enough to move them for pieces or cap relief. But this summer, they have only made one signature move, and that was spending way too much for Joe Johnson.

The vast number of ways in which the Johnson signing was poorly conceived is staggering. The full max, all six years? That much money? The roster had potential to really contend, but instead, the Hawks simply avoided the great collapse of losing a high usage player with low efficiency. Johnson can take over a game like few in the league. But he also simply isn't worth the money, and it's hamstrung their franchise for the future.

Grade: D+

Charlotte Bobcats

Added: Shaun Livingston (free agency), Dominic Maguire (free agency), Matt Carroll (trade), Erick Dampier (trade), Eduardo Najera (trade)
Lost: Raymond Felton (free agency), Alexis Ajinca (trade), Tyson Chandler (trade)

Philosophy: "Slight derivatives"

Did the Bobcats get better? Did they get worse? Did they stay the same? No, those aren't rhetorical. I'm asking. Because looking at that list above, I really can't be sure. They lost an underrated point guard who worked hard but never could stick with Larry Brown. They added a recovering injury-plagued point guard who can't seem to stick with any coach. They lost a veteran seven foot center with wear and tear on him and a large contract. They brought in an aging behemoth with wear and tear issues and a big contract. And they got Dominic Maguire, so they've got that going for them.

Larry Brown and Rod Higgins have built a program of improvement through trade and have kept up with this offseason. Adding Livingston provides a high-upside, low-risk replacement for Felton and they managed to trim some long-term money off the books. But you can't look at the roster and say they've improved dramatically. Status quo for the Cats. Underrated moves that still don't move them up dramatically in the NBA world.

Grade: C-

Orlando Magic


Added: J.J. Redick (re-signed), Chris Duhon (free agency), Quentin Richardson (free agency), Daniel Orton (draft), Stanley Robinson (draft)
Lost: Matt Barnes (free agency)

Philosophy: "The fear of losing out."

Marcin Gortat wants a bigger role. Benched. Brandon Bass wants a bigger role. Benched. J.J. Redick wanted a bigger role and more money. Offer from the Bulls matched and benched. The Magic seem to really believe in this roster, and it shows in them re-signing Redick and only addint marginal adjustments at other positions. Their draft essentially yielded them a raw, underdeveloped player who has little to no chance of getting playing time (Orton) and another wing to be buried deep. They didn't lose anyone, which means the luxury tax and the Magic are best of friends, especially after matching the $20 million offer for Redick from the Bulls.

Without any adjustments, and with how much better the East has gotten, it's hard to argue that the Magic have improved by not subtracting. Chris Duhon might be considered an upgrade over Jason Williams, but we're talking inches, not miles, and Quentin Richardson brings better three point shooting than Matt Barnes . That may be the best addition the Magic made, adding another shooter that provides an alternative reason not to play Vince Carter when he goes in a hole. But all in all, for a franchise that has spent the money to contend, they simply haven't done enough to get there.

Grade: C-

Miami Heat


Added: LeBron James (free agency sign-and-trade), Chris Bosh (free agency sign-and-trade), Dwyane Wade (re-signed), Mike Miller (free agency), Udonis Haslem (re-signed), Zydrunas Ilgauskas (re-signed), James Jones (re-signed), Joel Anthony (re-signed), Jamaal Magloire (re-signed), Juwan Howard (free-agency), Dexter Pittman (draft), Jarvis Varnado (draft), Da'Sean Butler (draft),

Lost:
Jermaine O'Neal (free agency), Quentin Richardson (free agency), Michael Beasley (trade), Daequan Cook (trade)

Philosophy:
"So, that went pretty well."

That's how you build a title contender. Any questions? The Heat managed to add all three of the top free agents this summer, fill out the roster with veteran talent that knows how to win and supports their Big 3, and did it all in a little less than fourteen days. Think about that. The Heat remade their team into a title contender in less time than it takes for your milk to go bad. It was a sweeping coup, one that has to lead people to believe it probably took much longer to orchestrate (cough*tampering*cough). What could the Heat have done better? Well, not allowing for the act to paint them as the most obnoxious triumverate in modern sports would have been nice. Other than that, it's hard to argue Pat Riley's anything but a genius. Getting Quentin Richardson would have been nice, but adding Mike Miller more than makes up for it. Zydrunas Ilgauskas and Joel Anthony gives the team some size to go along with the incredible talent they have. From when once mortals stood, now there be gods. Geez, Riley, save some for the rest of the class.

Grade: A

Washington Wizards


Added: John Wall (draft), Kirk Hinrich (trade), Trevor Booker (draft), Yi Jianlian (trade), Hamady N'Diaye (draft), Hilton Armstrong (free agency), Kevin Seraphin (draft)
Lost: Randy Foye (free agency), Mike Miller (free agency), Shaun Livingston (free agency)

Philosophy:
"Let's see how this goes."

One thing is absolutely certain. John Wall is the future. Everything is built around Wall as the future. He is the singular sure thing. Other than that, sussing out a pattern that goes beyond "keep it flexible, stupid" is tough. The team acquired Kirk Hinrich in one of the more baffling moves we've seen. Hinrich brings a veteran defensive guard that can play on or off ball, back up Wall, and anchor the defense. But he's also an underwhelming shooter (oh, where, oh, where have you gone, 2005 shooting average?) and doesn't seem like an ideal fit next to Wall. Neither does the incumbent shooting guard, Gilbert Arenas , who you may remember from such films as "The Single Worst Offseason Meltdown in the History of the League" and "Little Blogger, Get Your Gun, Then Bring It To The Arena."

Arenas' ability to play next to Wall will decide his future in Washington. No longer is the team willing to build around him. If he can slide into an off-ball shooter that complements Wall? Terrific. Redemption abounds. Provided he stays out of trouble, of course. If he can't, he's trade bait. He may be already. The addition of Yi Jianlian seems like a "let's see what this does" kind of tinkering. The team still needs a long-term solution at small-forward, and with Andray Blatche recovering from injury, there are questions all over in the frontcourt. When you realize that JaVale McGee seems like the player best adapted to mix with John Wall, you know you've got a ways to go in the rebuilding process.

To evaluate? They failed to make any signings or trades that wow you, but they also managed to not screw up the #1 overall pick and cleaned some salary off the books for the future. Not a bad day at the office. And that's better than last year.

Grade: B-
Posted on: July 22, 2010 12:40 pm
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Posted on: July 6, 2010 10:47 am
 

Your Morning Shootaround 7.6.10

What's going on in the NBA world...

Dwyane Wade cancelled his press conference for this morning in Miami. No reason was given. Let's not try and get ahead of ourselves, but whichever way you lean in the whole thing, it's curious.

Mikhail Prokhorov told advisers he thinks Chris Bosh will join Dwyane Wade in Miami. He's still hopeful to land LeBron James. Most interesting to me from the notes was Prokhorov's statement about Bosh and Wade's agent Henry Thomas not being aware of the global business implications. If this was leaked intentionally, that provides a whole new context to these statements.

The Magic signed Chris Duhon to a four year deal , which should help with almost none of their needs.

LeBron James is giving indications he plans on announcing his decision on his next team via his own website . Which will, inevitably, crash when he does announce it. I like this plan, already.

Allen Iverson wants to return to the NBA. This should end well. And by "well," I mean "in a turnover."

The Cavs and Suns have started talks about a Leandro Barbosa for Delonte West and Jamario Moon swap.

We'll have more on these stories and more throughout the day.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com