Tag:Chris Webber
Posted on: April 1, 2011 2:33 pm
  •  
 

Mark Cuban blasts Chris Webber over criticism

Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban responds to criticism from TNT commentator Chris Webber. Posted by Ben Golliver. mark-cuban

On Thursday night, a game between the Dallas Mavericks and Los Angeles Lakers turned really ugly in the fourth quarter, with Mavericks guard Jason Terry shoving Lakers guard Steve Blake sparking a fracas that included Lakers forward Matt Barnes throwing Mavericks assistant coach Terry Stotts to the ground. 

After the game, TNT commentator Chris Webber called out the Mavericks for being "soft" and not responding to the physical challenge by the Lakers. SportsGrid.com has some of Webber's comments.
“You play against teams, and certain teams are like children,” said Webber. “Certain teams are like the bully you don’t want to play.”
He reserved his sharpest criticism for Nowitzki and Haywood: “Jason Terry is the only Dallas Maverick that does something. Look at Dirk Nowitzki, look at these two big guys, look at Haywood. They deserve to be fined.”
In a Friday morning radio interview with 103.3 FM in Dallas, Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban shot back at Webber, defending his team's toughness and questioning Webber's originality.
"Chris Webber has never had an original thought. It doesn't really matter. You know how these guys work. The last time I looked it was Jason Terry pushing and our guys responding -- no one is backing down from anybody. And it's the same nonsense talked by the same people who haven't had an original thought in their entire lives. Look, we don't care what Chris Webber says. It doesn't matter what Chris Webber says. We just go out and do our thing." 
Cuban's stance is on the money. After a heated game -- not to mention a brutal loss -- it's nice to hear from the owner that he still has faith in your abilities heading into the playoffs. Webber's criticism isn't coming from left field. Cuban is correct in saying that it's not original criticism but only because the "soft" label has followed the Mavericks for years.

Should anyone really care if they are called "soft" in today's NBA? No, not really. But they should care if they can't match the intensity level of their opponent in a big game and that's what happened to the Mavericks last night.
Posted on: March 9, 2011 10:27 am
Edited on: March 9, 2011 10:39 am
 

Video: Chris Webber tells it like it is for Miami

Posted by Royce Young

Everyone has an opinion on the Heat right now. Everyone is trying to figure out the problems, the issues, the crying. Some people just put it better than others, like Chris Webber did last night on NBATV following Miami's loss to Portland.



Webber's best point -- of many great ones -- is that when you have this much talent, you get this much criticism. He also says that the team should go to Erik Spoelstra and say, "I think we should be quiet now." Webber's point of "shut up and play" is well put because he's right, all the high school pep talking is getting old. All this "we're brothers!" talk, all this "we're Warriors!" talk and all this "stay together, trust each other!" stuff are just words in the end.

(I like how Kevin McHale just said "Yeah, yep, uh-huh" like 40 times while Webber went off. He just wanted to be part of it.)

And this line was awesome, even though I'm not totally sure what it means: "That's the league man. You driving a Ferrari and you want to tell me you have an extra tire in the back?"
Category: NBA
Posted on: January 14, 2011 2:01 pm
 

The state of the Nuggets fanbase re: Melo

Roundball Mining Company is an excellent Nuggets blog. This morning they posted an examination of whether to be angry or upset with Carmelo Anthony about all that's gone down in the past six months. It's well worth a read:

The Denver Nuggets are not what you would call a traditional powerhouse.  For most of nearly a decade and a half Denver was a doormat.  It is true there were some inspiring players and some exciting, even historic, moments.  The Nuggets also tortured fans with the Paul Westhead experiment Dick Motta and the dreadful backcourt of Junior Harrington and Vincent Yarbrough.  For the most part Denver suffered from poor management, lacked talent, some of their best players suffered debilitating injuries, see LaPhonso Ellis and Antonio McDyess, and the franchise was largely irrelevant.


That all changed when Carmelo Anthony arrived.  Since Melo was drafted by the Nuggets in June of 2003 Denver has yet to have a losing season or miss the playoffs.  After being one of the best teams in the ABA, once the Nuggets joined the NBA in 1976 they had never even had more than three consecutive winning seasons.  Alex English never lead the Nuggets to seven straight winning seasons.  No Nugget player has.  Carmelo was the catalyst of the longest stretch of prosperity this franchise has ever experienced.
via Roundball Mining Company » Should I be Mad at Carmelo Anthony?.


So that's an element here to be considered. Carmelo Anthony really did give the Nuggets the most success they've had in the history of their franchise. Which of course says a lot about the history of their franchise that habitual first-round exits with one great playoff run in a weak conference year is the best you've ever had, but still. Carmelo Anthony brought the most success to the Nuggets they've ever had. And now he's vapor trails. 
That's a complicated situation for fans. On the one hand, he's given that franchise more than they've ever had before. He's given them seven good years of consistent playoff-caliber seasons. He's put them on the NBA map, made them into a contender, if you take that word to its loosest interpretation. It's easy to argue he's given the fans more than they've ever had before, and so he doesn't owe them anything. 

On the other hand, how this shapes out is more similar to "The Decision" than some people would like to admit. By dragging this out, by having it hang over the team, even though those are decisions above him, he's hurting the fanbase and making them suffer through his departure. People have argued that the reason James is hated is because of how he left, not that he did leave. But in the end, results matter. The fans want Melo to stay, and he's not going to. And had he slipped off in the night under cover of free agency, the backlash would likely be palpable as well. At least Melo's been smart enough not to exacerbate it with public comments (which would get him fined). 

At the heart of this, again, though, is the question of whether players have a right to determine their own futures in terms of where they want to work. That same right is afforded you and I. However, the difference here is that Melo signed a contract and then an extension with the Nuggets to play in Denver. He wants an adjustment of that contract before its completion. Perhaps that's the issue. 

In a related note, check out Chris Webber's passionate but extremely insightful and lucid discussion of the Melo situation (starting at 1:18):





(HT: TheDailySegWay on Twitter)
Posted on: December 23, 2010 8:11 am
Edited on: August 14, 2011 9:46 pm
 

Shootaround 12.23.10: McGrady calls out Bosh

Tracy McGrady calls out Chris Bosh, the Bobcats look to deal for a veteran point guard, Chris Webber asks questions about Brandon Roy, the Kings look to build a new home and Landry Fields continues to get a lot of love in NYC. Posted by Ben Golliver  shootaround
  • Tracy McGrady returned to Toronto Wednesday night and was booed by Raptors fans, years after he departed the city for Orlando. McGrady's response, via the Vancouver Sun. "“Keep booing me. I love it. It really doesn’t bother me at all,” said McGrady, who at one point even talked back at a heckling fan after hitting a shot. “It’s not like I was like Chris Bosh and selling out the city like the city was horrible or something, making crazy comments about the city.”
  • The Bulls destroyed the Sixers the other day, and Tom Haberstroh notes that center Joakim Noah's absence couldn't come at a better time for Chicago, given their easy schedule over the next six weeks.
  • Houston Rockets guard Kevin Martin tells NBA Fanhouse he's not too thrilled about the idea of rebuilding in Yao Ming's absence. "Rebuilding is definitely not something I want to go through again," said Martin, whose contract runs through 2013 and has a combined $24 million remaining after this season. "Daryl thinks I'm an important member of this team, especially on the offensive end, for many years to come. But this being the business, you just never know." 
  • Speaking of Fields, the Knicks defeated the Oklahoma City Thunder on Wednesday night, causing PostingandToasting.com to get pretty excited about life. "Landry Fields. Oh, Landry Landry Landry boy. How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. I love when you get a hand on a rebound, helping the Knicks regain possession without ever personally securing the ball. I love when you cut baseline for easy backdoor buckets. I love when you make slick passes in transition. I love when you nail open threes, ugly as your form may be. I love when you poach passing lanes so expertly that it looks like the pass was intended for you. I love you when you bum rush the offensive glass for tip-ins. I love when you block the shots of guys who tower over you. I love when you throw outlet passes right on the money. I love when you claw over screens to draw charges. I love when you laugh, because I laugh too. I love when we sing to each other. I love when we frolic and pick wild berries together. You complete me, Landry Fields."
Posted on: July 15, 2010 2:03 pm
 

David Kahn thinks Darko is "Manna from heaven"

Posted by Matt Moore

This is too easy. It really is. I could spend 250-500 words describing all the absolutely ridiculous content in the video below. I could talk about the insanity of comparing Vlade Divac, one of the greatest big men with touch in the league to Darko Milicic, a stone with two legs. I could talk about comparing Chris Webber's storied career to Darko's which is storied in the annals of draft busts. I could point out what Tom Haberstroh of HoopData.com did this morning, which is the unbelievable gap in assist percentage between Vlade/Webber and Darko. But really, the video tells the best story all by itself.

Highlights:

  • Darko Milicic is "Manna from heaven." 
  • Darko can pass "like Vlade"
  • Webber: "Vlade Divac?"
  • Darko's career similar to Chris Webber.
  • Chris Webber: Darko's career not similar to Chris Webber.
  • Webber: "Good luck"


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com