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Tag:Corey Maggette
Posted on: August 12, 2011 4:46 pm
 

Maggette in 'serious talks' with Greek pro team?

Posted by Royce Young

One more log on the pile. According to reports, Milwaukee Bucks guard Corey Maggette is in "serious discussions" with PAOK in Greece. Other than the obvious "Hey an NBA player might sign overseas" angle, what's interesting is that Greece, a country whose economy is worse shape than John Daly's liver, has a team making a huge offer to an NBA player.

No word on how much the offer is for, but Maggette currently has $21 million and two years left on his current NBA deal.

A report from TalkBasket.net also notes
that if Maggette doesn't end up with PAOK, the team is having conversations with other unknown NBA players. PAOK has housed some NBA talent previously as Rasho Nesterovic, Peja Stojakovic and even Scott Skiles have played there. PAOK isn't the biggest team in Greece, but it certainly is a pretty large one.

Maggette clearly isn't a marquee name, but he is a solid NBA player that makes a pretty good living. But as Euroleague president Jordi Bertomeu said recently, he still doesn't expect to see NBA players in Europe. Regardless, Maggette is just the latest name to jump on the list of players looking hard at Europe.
Posted on: July 6, 2011 7:01 pm
Edited on: July 6, 2011 7:15 pm
 

NBA locking out Stephen Curry's wedding?

Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry says that the NBA might prevent team officials from attending his wedding. Posted by Ben Golliver. stephen-curry

The NBA's lockout is a literal term: players are physically locked out from team facilities and cannot have direct contact with team officials. The league has scrubbed its website and threatened to fine teams that contact players, even through social networking sites.

Apparently, weddings are off-limits too, at least without official clearance from the league office.

Yahoo! Sports reports that Warriors guard Stephen Curry is about to get hitched and isn't sure whether Golden State employees will be able to attend.
Curry also has some other plans for July: He and his fiancèe, Ayesha Alexander, are getting married in Charlotte at the end of the month. He expects eight Warriors teammates, other NBA players like Rudy Gay, Ronny Turiaf and Corey Maggette and members of former Warriors coach Keith Smart’s staff to attend. He’s still waiting to see if Warriors’ front office officials and Bobcats assistant coach Stephen Silas, a former Golden State assistant, can get cleared by the NBA to go. Miami Heat officials were recently given permission to attend Chris Bosh’s wedding.

“They all sent their regards and petitioned the league to come to the wedding, so they’re not breaking any rules,” Curry said. “As of right now, they can’t come. I don’t know how the process is going. If they show up, they show up. If not, I understand why.”
Poor Curry thought it was bad when he needed to ask the bride's father for his daughter's hand in marriage. Now he needs to turn to NBA commissioner David Stern for a second level of permission.

"Does anyone here object to this union? Speak now or forever hold your peace."

"I do," shouts Stern as he emerges from underneath a pew in the church's fourth row. "Silas just slapped Curry's back and whispered 'congratulations' in his ear. That will be one million dollars! Please make the check payable to Adam Silver."

OK, OK, it's not quite that ridiculous. Given the recent, clear precedent established by the Bosh wedding, Curry's nuptials should come off without a hitch and with the entire invited guest list in attendance.

Still, what a hassle. Requiring that these players and coaches formally request permission without rubberstamping it? Terrible. As if newlyweds didn't have enough to stress about.
Posted on: June 23, 2011 4:37 pm
Edited on: June 23, 2011 5:56 pm
 

NBA TRADE: Bucks, Bobcats, Kings 3-way

Posted by Matt Moore

Update 4:14 p.m.: Ken Berger of CBSSports.com reports that the Bobcats moved up to No. 7 to select Bismack Biyombo. That makes for a crazy pairing with Tyrus Thomas and the most athletic pair of frontcourt players in the league, probably, based on raw length and leaping ability.

Additionally, a writer from NBA.com notes that the move for the Kings was not made in anticipation of a second deal with San Antonio. Such a fail for the Kings.

Original Report: In a day filled with trade rumors on what's expected to be a wild night even with a disappointing draft class, things touched off Thursday afternoon as the Bobcats, Bucks, and Kings completed a three-way trade. Ken Berger of CBSSports.com reports:

The Bucks receive: Stephen Jackson, Beno Udrih, and the No.19 pick from Charlotte.

The Kings receive: John Salmons and the No.10 from the Bucks.

The Bobcats receive: Corey Maggette and the No. 7 pick from Sacramento.


Analysis: .... WHAT?! That's our general reaction. You're looking at three shooting guards with massive deals getting moved around. Here's the contract run downs from ShamSports.com:

Jackson: Two years, over $19 million, all guaranteed. 

Salmons: Four years, $31 million, over $24 million guaranteed.

Maggette: Two years, over $21 million, all guaranteed.

So the Bucks moved over $45 million guaranteed, and took on $35 million (Jackson plus $14 million from Udrih), saving them over $10 million and dumping most of their bloated contracts. The Bobcats took on Maggette which is an upgrade at the two-guard position, and managed to keep their No.9 pick, now giving them the 7th and 9th pick in Thursday's draft. And the Kings? Uh, they moved back three spots and picked up an aging, undersized shooting guard to go with Tyreke Evans and Marcus Thornton. ...Okay. 

Winner: We'll call it the Bucks, who lost all that salary and still picked up an upgrade on the wing, and still kept a top-20 pick. The addition of Udrih is curious considering Brandon Jennings' place on the roster and will add more question marks towards his future. (Some reports have Shawn Livingston included in the deal going to Milwaukee.) But they cleared all that space and still kept a pick, which is pretty impressive. It's a chance for the Bucks to move back, bring in a wing, and clear some space for a restructured CBA after their spending spree last summer. Grade: B+

Co-Winner: If the Bobcats hadn't had to take on Maggette, they would have won this. Maggette's not a terrible fill-in for Jackson, and the addition of the 7th pick while keeping the 9th means the Bobcats have a chance to wholly remake themselves in the draft, which they have struggled at through the years. This move reeks of Rich Cho, opting for a youth movement while clearing space. If Livingston is indeed included, the Bobcats will actually have managed to save money through this with total outgoing salary of over $22 million compared to Maggette's $21 million incoming. And they get the No.7 pick to go with their No.9. They can draft a big and a wing, two bigs, both Morris twins, Jimmer Fredette as a flyer pick, anything. Grade: B+

Loser: What in God's name are the Kings thinking? Is this some sort of desperate move to make the fans hate them so they'll stop wishing they would stay in Sacramento? There's talk this could be in anticipation of a move for Tony Parker. Even then, a small-market franchise taking on Salmons contract along with Parker's is a rough idea. And where does this leave Marcus Thornton? Is he doomed to perpetual burying by his coaching staff? Will Salmons come off the bench? What is the thought process here? 

The Kings presumably think they can get the guy they want at No. 10 versus No. 7, but taking on Salmons is such a blow, despite giving up Udrih. Udrih wasn't the answer at point guard. Salmons isn't the answer at anything they need.  Grade: F- (pending further action)
Posted on: March 15, 2011 12:07 pm
 

Former Clipper players stepped up in crunch time

Posted by Royce Young



The story of former Clipper assistant and one time interim coach Kim Hughes was highlighted in the Journal Times today, and in that is the fact that after Hughes was diagnosed with prostrate cancer, the organization wouldn't pay for his treatment.

"I contacted the Clippers about medical coverage and they said the surgery wouldn't be covered," Hughes said in the story. "I said, ‘Are you kidding me?' And they said if they did it for one person, they'd have to do for everybody else."

Of course this spawned a good amount of "Oh the Clippers" type of comments, even though they might not be entirely fair. (I mean, the Clippers do have a point.) But it made me think: Shouldn't the Clippers be the kind of organization that does the exact opposite of what happened here and go above an beyond? With the type of reputation the franchise has for screwing things up and doing things the wrong way, wouldn't they see this as an opportunity to make a statement the other direction?

But then of course, here's where you remember that Donald Sterling owns the franchise and he cares not for going above and beyond or the "right way".

The story doesn't end there though. Good thing, because I was depressed. In fact, it ends with some inspiration.
When Dunleavy learned the Clippers wouldn't cover the cost of Hughes' surgery, he mentioned it to his players.

Several of them, including now Milwaukee Bucks forward Corey Maggette, Chris Kaman, Elton Brand and Marko Jaric, were taken aback by the news and decided to offer their assistance.

"Kim was one of our coaches and he's a really good friend of mine, too," Maggette said. "He was in a situation where the Clippers' medical coverage wouldn't cover his surgery. I thought it was a great opportunity to help someone in need, to do something that Christ would do.

"It shows your humanity, that you care for other people and not just yourself. Kim was in a life-and-death situation."

It was indeed a dicey time for Hughes. After a biopsy was taken, he learned his prostate cancer was much worse than he believed.

The cancer had quickly spread and was on the brink of moving to other areas of his body.
Players stepped up, in a big way. The organization wouldn't cover the treatment so a couple players raised their hand. So while you can point at the Clippers and make a joke or two, the moral of the story is, you can still step up when someone else doesn't. That's what Maggette, Kaman, Brand and Jaric did for Hughes.

And by all accounts, Hughes is recovering well. Which in the end, is really all that matters.
Posted on: February 11, 2011 1:54 pm
Edited on: February 11, 2011 3:44 pm
 

Friday 5 with KB: Trade Deadline Waters




Posted by Matt Moore 

In today's Friday 5 with KB: A favorite story from Jerry Sloan, the future of Utah, the choppy waters of this year's trade deadline, and when exactly are the Spurs going to hit double-digit losses?



1. So, yeah, Jerry's gone. Which kind of bums everyone out. Do you have a favorite Sloan story to share?

Ken Berger, CBSSports.com: Everyone, including me, made fun of Sloan's Hall of Fame acceptance speech two years ago because he basically told his entire life story. But I was touched by how nonchalantly Sloan talked about having lasted only five days as the University of Evansville basketball coach in the late 1970s. The season after he stepped down, his replacement, coach Bobby Watson, and the entire team and support staff were killed in a plane crash. Sloan said it matter-of-factly, just like that, and without blinking got right back to his story. "I spent 2 1-2 years as assistant coach of the Bulls ...," etc. That was Jerry. I don't know why I will always remember that, but I will.


2. Speaking of the Jazz, is there any chance they are able to reassert the kind of stability they've had over the past three decades? Is the organization and environment built in such a way as to develop that kind of constancy? Or are we going to see the Jazz back in the mire of the pack, having to reinvent themselves multiple times in a decade?

KB: The biggest priority, obviously, is persuading Deron Williams to stay. If he leaves as a free agent in 2012, there's no way around it: the Jazz are in for a major rebuild. Before they're faced with that possibility, however, the first order of business is maintaining stability on the bench. By naming Tyrone Corbin to succeed Sloan without saddling him with an interim title is an important first step. GM Kevin O'Connor and Gail Miller, the widow of later owner Larry Miller, both made clear they are committed to Corbin for the long term. Those intentions obviously will have to be backed up at some point by a multi-year head coaching contract, but that will come in time. There's been one head coach in Salt Lake City for nearly a quarter century. The plan certainly isn't to go from that to massive turnover.


3. Lost in Ray Allen's epic three-pointer and Kobe's late game heroics Thursday night was this: Boston's lost their last two, and are 5-5 in their last ten. Has the time come for the Celtics to coast through the second half?

KB: I think their recent struggles are less about coasting and more about injuries. The return of Kendrick Perkins has been muted by the absence of Shaq, Jermaine O'Neal and even Semih Erden. Boston also is without Marquis Daniels, Delonte West and Nate Robinson. So it's time to begin wondering if the only thing that can hold the Celtics back -- health -- is starting to rear its ugly head.


4. Alright, Ken. When are the Spurs going to hit double digit losses?

KB: With Philly, Washington and New Jersey next up on the road, I'm going to go out on a limb and say not before the All-Star break. The Spurs haven't lost two straight since early January, so I'm going to say their 10th loss doesn't come until March 4 or 6, when they play Miami and the Lakers.


5. Instability in Utah, the Denver situation, Portland teetering on the brink, Charlotte looking at a need to dump salary, Houston desperate to make a deal. For a long time it looked like we weren't going to be seeing much in the way of trades this year. But are the storm clouds gathering for another busy deadline?

KB: The way I see it now, there will be more buyers than sellers. Several teams have contracts they'd like to dump (Philly with Andre Iguodala, Charlotte with Stephen Jackson, Cleveland with Antawn Jamison or Mo Williams, the Bucks with Corey Maggette or Drew Gooden), but who is going to take on those kind of obligations heading unto uncertain CBA territory? Also, the teams with the most cap space, Sacramento and Minnesota, are going to be less likely than in past years to take money into that space given that they don't know what the 2011-12 cap and rules will be. First-round picks also will be more expensive on the trade market because they represent cheap labor. Whereas in past years, teams would be willing to give up a first simply to get off a contract, this time they'll want something else in return -- such as a second-round pick. The teams that will be able to do something are those that have quality players on expiring contracts -- such as Indiana with Jeff Foster, Mike Dunleavy, and T.J. Ford; and Portland with Joel Przybilla and Andre Miller (whose 2011-12 salary is non-guaranteed).
Posted on: December 29, 2010 10:23 am
 

Shootaround 12.29.10: 5-Hour Tuff Juice

Kings don't want Ming, Camby doesn't want out, and a really weird Mavs video, all in today's Shootaround. 

Posted by Matt Moore

Vince Carter is expected to make his Suns debut tonight. The Suns' training staff is excited to take on their biggest challenge yet. Keeping Carter on the floor for more than five minutes at a time. 

Marcus Camby has had just about enough of being bounced around and is feeling very "Danny Glover in Lethal Weapon." He may be too old for this stuff. He's making noise that were he to be traded to a bottom-feeder like Charlotte, he may just retire instead. He doesn't need the cash and has talked about retirement for a few years now. 

Since when did Kobe Bryant feel the need to get into it with third year players like George Hill?

And since when did Pau Gasol feel the need to call out the Lakers' lack of inside presence without taking on the responsibility himself for not establishing post position? Gasol did respond to suggestions that the Lakers' bigs needed to call for the ball more, but didn't comment on his post position.

The Heat's intro video is really silly.

The Magic have shot 47.4% from the arc since the big trade two weeks ago. So much of that is having more weapons on the floor and guys who understand spacing. The guys they shipped out had simply lost that with age. 

Corey Maggette is making all sorts of bad noise in Milwaukee about the team, the coaches, everything. Bad mojo on the horizon. 

The Kings are not interested in any trade for Yao Ming. Which is bizarre because anything else they would get back from Houston would be better than what they have now. 

Then there's this. Whatever this is. 

Posted on: October 4, 2010 4:54 pm
Edited on: October 4, 2010 5:16 pm
 

Aussie Aussie Aussie! Bogut cleared to play!

Bucks center cleared to play in preseason games.
Posted by Matt Moore


Andrew Bogut has been cleared to play in preseason games , which is pretty neat for them. Bogut's been all over the place in terms of predicting how he's coming along, and he's pretty set to avoid long-term injury, so this may not be set. But having Bogut back will help a ton in terms of Skiles trying to set rotations considering the number of changes the Bucks brought in.

It'll be interesting to see how the injury restricts Bogut. Using Synergy Sports , we see that Bogut only shot 43% in the post last year, and only drew fouls 5% of the time. He was much better in the pick and roll (shooting 70%) and in offensive rebounding situations (57%). But pick and roll requires more coordination with the mitts, and offensive rebounds are of course more physical. So the question will be how Bogut can react to the delicate nature of his wrist while he recovers from one of the grossest falls of all time.

Meanwhile, he does need to get floor time, because Brandon Jennings is still very much a work in progress. Working on Jennings' shot selection will be greatly improved if he learns to go to the big fella, and often. There are some new egos on the squad with Corey Maggette and Drew Gooden, so Bogut's presence is needed to establish the alpha dogs on the team. So his being on board from the get go has to boost the Bucks' chances of not only holding onto their playoff spot but improving on it.


Posted on: September 24, 2010 3:30 am
 

Preseason Primer: Milwaukee Bucks

Posted by Matt Moore

Fear the Deer. It became the meme of the NBA last season, and you were hard-pressed to find a hardcore NBA-head who didn't love the scrappy team from Milwaukee. Heading into training camp things are dramatically different. Andrew Bogut is recovering from injury again, but outside of that, the stakes are much higher. The Bucks were the fifth seed in the East and had it not been for Bogut's injury likely would have bested the Hawks. Now they need to somehow improve on last year's performance in an Eastern Conference which is loaded at every turn. What do they have to do in training camp to get that done? We'll let you in on the secrets as we continue our Preseason Primers.

Training camp site: Milwaukee, WI />
Training camp starts: September 28th

Key additions: Corey Maggette (trade), Drew Gooden (free agency), Larry Sanders (draft), Chris Douglas-Roberts (trade)

Key subtractions: Charlie Bell (trade), Luke Ridnour (free agency), Dan Gadzuric (trade)

Likely starting lineup: Brandon Jennings (PG), John Salmons (SG), Corey Maggette (SF), Drew Gooden (PF), Andrew Bogut (C)

Player to watch: Chris Douglas-Roberts. Okay, this is a lie. If Brandon Jennings is involved in any way, you watch him. But CDR's not a bad backup option, literally. With the Bucks needing a legit backup shooting guard, CDR has a chance to capitalize on his combination of handle and size if he can develop into a well-rounded player that commits to Scott Skiles' system. CDR is also highly explosive and can go off at any time, so how he reacts to Skiles' military approach may be the defining verdict on his career if things go sour.


Chemistry quiz: The Bucks worked really well together last year and embraced Jennings as a leader. The question will be how players like Drew Gooden, CDR, and Corey Maggette do in a system that asks them sacrifice and play defense consistently. The team struggled offensively last year, but a perk of that was a lack of ego-centric players who weren't looking for their shot. As delicate as chemistry is, the changes the Bucks brought in could create too many guys looking for FGAs.


Camp battles: Carlos Delfino versus Corey Maggette should be a great one. Maggette had a fantastic season last year and is a better overall player than Maggette. But Maggette has the contract and offensive firepower to demand a starting spot. Skiles abandoned Delfino in the playoffs when he wasn't in a good matchup. There's no telling how this one will wind up, but Delfino's play in FIBA this summer certainly is cause for excitement.

Injury issues:
I think the fact that reports have come out daily about Andrew Bogut's elbow is probably indicative he's a concern. That and the fact that he had more metal put in than that chick in Fringe with they cybernetic arm. That too.

Biggest strength: Simplicity. The Bucks don't over-complicate things. They defend like rabid animals, run basic offensive sets geared to give playmakers the ball in space, and work their tail off. It's an optimal system not only for a standard of success, anchored by a talented point guard and center, but easy for new pieces to fit in. Skiles continues to impress as a coach that is able to get through to guys and convince them to commit.

Glaring weakness: They added multiple offensive weapons, but there are going to be concerns with the age of both Maggette and Gooden, as well as how Brandon Jennings fits with all these high-usage players on board. That same simplicity also creates problems when they hit a team with a counter to their approach.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com