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Tag:Jason Kapono
Posted on: February 25, 2011 5:22 pm
 

Friday 5 with KB: The hard cost of business



Posted by Matt Moore 


In today's Friday 5 with KB: A favorite story from Jerry Sloan, the future of Utah, the choppy waters of this year's trade deadline, and when exactly are the Spurs going to hit double-digit losses?
 


1. Well... that trade deadline was beyond all reason. What was the most stunning moment for you in the midst of all the chaos of the past 72-96 hours?

Ken Berger, CBSSports.com: Deron Williams to the Nets, hands down. Though there was some hint of trouble with our report during All-Star weekend that D-Will had begun hatching his escape-to-New York plan last summer, no one expected the Jazz to take the bold step of trading him in the next 72 hours. Stunning, and a small victory for teams and owners against the superstar power-play movement.

2. You talked a lot about the business side of the Celtics' decision to move Perkins. What does it say that a big market team with deep pockets was put into a position to be concerned about finances?

KB: It's not so much finances with the Celtics. In a no-cap system like baseball has, they never would have done this trade. They just would've kept Perk and paid him. But with all signs pointing to a hard cap, or at least a harder cap on the way, Boston couldn't afford to leave itself vulnerable to losing a 26-year-old, 6-10 center and getting nothing in return. And if you think about it, one of the players the Celtics got back, Jeff Green, was someone they drafted in 2007 and traded for Ray Allen. Getting Troy Murphy on a minimum deal after he's bought out also will help ease the pain. An underrated benefit of this deal for the Thunder is that Perk's Bird rights go with him in the trade. That is, if Bird rights survive in the new CBA.

3. Buyouts are going to be all the rage for the next two weeks. What are you hearing in terms of players who might be available for the contenders to sign?

KB: Besides Murphy, Jared Jeffries is going to the Knicks, while Darius Songaila and Jason Kapono could help a contender if they're bought out. Rip Hamilton was on the verge of getting bought out as part of a trade to the Cavs, but we know that didn't work out too well for him. I doubt Hamilton, with two years left on his deal, gets bought out now. Same for Marcus Camby for the same reason.

4. Is Mikhail Prokhorov in the top five of most entertaining owners, after this week?

KB: Top two. Prokhorov is on Cuban's level now. Between his stunning squashing of the Melo trade talks in January and his bold move to extract D-Will from Utah, Prokhorov served noticed that he's in this to go toe-to-toe with the Knicks. In a related story, spokesperson Ellen Pinchuk will not go down in the annals of disingenuous spokespeople, right there with Baghdad Bob.

5. How hard is the personal side of these trades for players? We're reading on Twitter players saying goodbye to each other, packing up their houses, their families. Is the cost of these moves high on a personal level?

KB: Harder than most people think. The common reaction is that no one should feel sorry for the players because they make so much money. But their kids don't care how much money their father makes, only that they won't see him for the rest of the season because he's been traded. Chauncey Billups is a prime example. He thought he was going home to finish his career in Colorado, only to have to tell his children he'll see them in May or June. Money is good, but nothing compares to family.
Posted on: November 1, 2010 2:03 pm
 

Sixers have no winners. Literally.

76ers are without a single player with professional winning record.
Posted by Matt Moore


The Sixers aren't really all that young. I mean, they're not old. But Andre Iguodala, their "star" is 26, entering his prime. Elton Brand is a dinosaur that never got to really rome the Earth, and they have five players 29 or older on roster. They have some young pieces in huge roles, like 22-year-old Thaddeus Young and 20-year-old Jrue Holiday, but in general, they're a pretty balanced squad, age-wise.

Which is what makes a fact Doug Collins relayed to the Philadelphia Inquirer 's Kate Fagan all the more stunning. From the PI :

In that vein, Sixers coach Doug Collins offered this statistic after the game (which he said he shared with his team as well): No player on the Sixers roster has a winning record as a professional. That actually struck me as quite amazing. Obviously there are the mainstays that you know don't have a winning record because they've been with the Sixers their entire careers (Andre Iguodala, Thaddeus Young, Lou Williams, etc.), but to think that even the added veterans and transplants (Andres Nocioni, Tony Battie) don't have winning records is amazing. It's a statistic that is common sense once you think about it, but still quite representative of the uphill battle this team faces.

Not one player. Not Andres Nocioni. Not former Western Conference Semifinalist Elton Brand, not Jason Kapono. Not "star" Andre Iguodala (I've overused the sarcastic quotes on the word star haven't I?). Nobody. That's impressive, in an opposite kind of way.

Philadelphia is currently winless, and third worst in efficiency in the league .After what many considered a promising preseason, the team has gotten blasted. Liberty Ballers, a Sixers blog, isn't freaking out three games in, being happy that the team is competing a full 48. That and a quarter will get the team exactly nothing, because you can't really buy anything for a quarter anymore. It may be time to start looking for more than effort. Like a trade. But theyr'e right. It's still early.

Unfortunately, history does not bode well for them either.
 
 
 
 
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